Posts Tagged 'multiple factors'

Photoprotective responses in a brown macroalgae Cystoseira tamariscifolia to increases in CO2 and temperature

Global warming and ocean acidification are increasingly affecting coastal ecosystems, with impacts that vary regionally depending upon local biogeography. Ocean acidification drives shifts in seaweed community dominance that depend on interactions with other factors such as light and nutrients. In this study, we investigated the photophysiological responses in the brown macroalgae species Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss with important structural role in the coastal Mediterranean communities. These algae were collected in the Cabo de Gata-Nijar Natural Park in ultraoligotrophic waters (algae exposed under high irradiance and less nutrient conditions) vs. those collected in the La Araña beach in oligotrophic waters (algae exposed at middle nutrient and irradiance conditions) in the Mediterranean Sea. They were incubated in mesocosms, under two levels of CO2; ambient (400-500 ppm) and high CO2 (1200-1300 ppm), combined with two temperatures (ambient temperature; 20 °C and ambient temperature + 4 °C; 24 °C) and the same nutrient conditions of the waters of the origin of macroalgae. Thalli from two sites on the Spanish Mediterranean coast were significantly affected by increases in pCO2 and temperature. The carotenoids (fucoxanthin, violaxanthin and β-carotene) contents were higher in algae from oligotrophic than that from ultraoligotrophic water, i.e., algae collected under higher nutrient conditions respect to less conditions, increase photoprotective pigments content. Thalli from both locations upregulated photosynthesis (as Fv/Fm) at increased pCO2 levels. Our study shows that ongoing ocean acidification and warming can increase photoprotection and photosynthesis in intertidal macroalgae.

Continue reading ‘Photoprotective responses in a brown macroalgae Cystoseira tamariscifolia to increases in CO2 and temperature’

Predation in high CO2 waters: prey fish from high-risk environments are less susceptible to ocean acidification

Most studies investigating the effects of anthropogenic environmental stressors do so in conditions that are often optimal for their test subjects, ignoring natural stressors such as competition or predation. As such, the quantitative results from such studies may often underestimate the lethality of certain toxic compounds. A well-known example of this concept is illustrated by the marked increase in the lethality of pesticides when larval amphibians are concurrently exposed to the odor of potential predators. Here, we investigated the interaction between background levels of environmental predation risk (high vs. low) and ocean acidification (ambient vs. elevated CO2) in 2 × 2 design. Wild-caught juvenile damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, were exposed in the laboratory to the different risk and CO2 conditions for 4 days and released onto coral reef patches. Using a well-established field assay, we monitored the in situ behavior and mortality of the damselfish for 2 days. We predicted that juvenile fish exposed to elevated CO2 and high-risk conditions would display more severe behavioral impairments and increased mortality compared to fish exposed to elevated CO2 maintained under low-risk conditions. As expected, elevated CO2 exposure led to impaired antipredator responses and increased mortality in low-risk fish compared to ambient CO2 controls. However, we failed to find an effect of elevated CO2 on the behavior and survival of the high-risk fish. We hypothesized that the results may stem from either a behavioral compensation or a physiological response to high risk. Our results provide insights into the interactive nature of environmental and natural stressors and advance our understanding of the predicted effect of ocean acidification on aquatic ecosystems.

Continue reading ‘Predation in high CO2 waters: prey fish from high-risk environments are less susceptible to ocean acidification’

Effects of ocean acidification and eutrophication on the macroalgae Ulva spp.

Ocean acidification is the increased absorption of atmospheric CO2 in seawater and the consequent decrease in pH. This phenomenon is occurring throughout the global oceans while land use changes and large human populations near coasts are linked to increased nutrient concentrations in seawater. Ulva spp. blooms caused by nutrient enrichment occur regularly in some parts of the world and are known as green tides. There is concern that ocean acidification may increase green tides and intensify ecological and economic damages. Ulva spp. can utilize bicarbonate (HCO3-) as an inorganic carbon source, but this comes at an energetic cost as HCO3- must be converted to CO2 before it can be used for carbon fixation. Therefore, increased utilization of pCO2 with ocean acidification may benefit Ulva spp. Ocean acidification and eutrophication will occur simultaneously in many coastal ecosystems. The goal of the following investigations was to determine the effects of ocean acidification and nutrient enrichment alone and their interaction on photosynthetic, nutrient, and growth physiology of Ulva spp. In Chapter 2, the response of Ulva australis to pHT and ammonium (NH4+) enrichment were investigated in a seven day growth experiment using a range of pHT (7.56 – 7.84) and ambient and enriched NH4+ concentrations. I measured relative growth rates (RGRs), NH4+ uptake rates and pools, photosynthetic characteristics, and tissue carbon and nitrogen content. There was no interaction of pHT and NH4+ enrichment on the physiological parameters. The RGR was not affected by pHT, but was an average of two times higher in the enriched NH4+ treatment. rETRmax, total chlorophyll, and tissue nitrogen increased with both NH4+ enrichment and decreased pHT. The C:N ratio decreased with decreasing pH and with NH4+ enrichment. Although rETRmax increased and the C:N ratio decreased under decreased pH, these metabolic changes did not translate to higher growth rates. The results show that U. australis growth and physiology is more sensitive to NH4+ than it is to pH and that there is no interactive effect of NH4+ enrichment and decreasing pH. In Chapter 3, Ulva lactuca was grown for 22 days under a range of pCO2 and NH4+ concentrations and a multiple linear regression was used to analyze RGRs, NH4+ and NO3- pools, in situ NH4+ and NO3- uptake rates, tissue carbon and nitrogen content, carbohydrate and protein concentrations, and photosynthesis irradiance curves (P-I curves). The results from model selection and model-averaging techniques allowed me to make predictive models across a range of relevant ocean acidification and eutrophication scenarios and measure the effect sizes of pCO2, NH4+ enrichment, and their interaction. Overall, there was no effect of pCO2 and NH4+ on RGRs after day 5. However, there was a synergistic effect of pCO2 and NH4+ enrichment on the growth rates during days 0 – 5. When pCO2 and NH4+ concentrations increased simultaneously, NO3- uptake rates increased, which may have contributed to increased growth as seen in days 0 – 5. Maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) decreased with increasing pCO2 and there was a positive interaction of pCO2 and NH4+ on indicating CCMs were altered under these conditions. This shows that under high light intensities, Pmax was negatively affected by pCO2 and CCMs are not altered when nutrients are limited. Ultimately, there was no longer-term effect of ocean acidification and eutrophication on Ulva lactuca growth. Nutrient enrichment is a major cause of green tide blooms around the world and Ulva australis had the ability to enhance nutrient, photosynthetic, and growth physiology with NH4+ enrichment. Conversely, Ulva lactuca collected from a eutrophic environment, did not respond to NH4+ in terms of growth. Both chapters provided evidence that ocean acidification is unlikely to affect the growth rates of Ulva spp. However, the exception was a positive interactive effect of pCO2 and NH4+ enrichment on the growth rate of U. lactuca during the first five days, suggesting ocean acidification could play a role in initiating Ulva spp. blooms in a eutrophic environment. This could be an important consideration for determining how green tides will be affected by ocean acidification in coastal areas where nutrient enrichment occurs in pulses, resulting in transiently increased nitrogen concentrations.

Continue reading ‘Effects of ocean acidification and eutrophication on the macroalgae Ulva spp.’

The effects of ocean warming and acidification on seaweed growth and urchin grazing

Human produced carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are currently higher than previously recorded and are continuing to rise at alarming rates. This greenhouse gas is the primary driver for changing climate scenarios highlighted by an approximate 1°C increase in sea surface temperatures. In addition to driving global warming, CO2 is readily absorbed by the oceans, resulting in changes in seawater chemistry and a decrease in seawater pH (acidification). The singular effects of ocean warming and acidification are known to impact marine organisms; lesser known, however, are the combined effects of these stressors, particularly on biotic interactions. This study aimed to expand on the knowledge of how these abiotic stressors affect seaweed and seaweed-herbivore interactions by comparing seaweed growth and herbivore feeding rate and selectivity under combinations of current and modelled future temperature (18°C and 21°C) and pH (8.1 and 7.8) conditions. Growth rates of two seaweed species, a calcified red alga (Lithothrix aspergillum) and a non-calcified brown alga (giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera), were compared among manipulated seawater conditions. In addition, the feeding rates and feeding selectivity of a common sea urchin herbivore (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) for these two seaweeds were compared among water conditions. Lithothrix was not affected by the singular effects of pH or temperature but under combined future temperature and pH conditions, the seaweed performed poorly. While acidification is known to affect the ability of calcifying species to deposit calcium carbonate, Lithothrix appeared to only be impacted by acidification under temperature stress. Macrocystis, on the other hand, performed significantly better under future acidic conditions, regardless of temperature, as it likely experienced an increase in photosynthetic rate driven by high CO2 concentrations. Urchin herbivory rates were elevated for both seaweeds grown under acidification scenarios, possibly due to increased grazing susceptibility of Lithothrix during poor calcification/decalcification conditions and Macrocystis during new growth conditions. Feeding preference trials were inconsistent with feeding rate patterns as urchins exhibited low overall consumption and no selectivity for either seaweed under any water condition. Although the impacts of warming and acidification on growth of seaweeds and susceptibility to grazing by urchins are variable among taxa, potential future stressors are likely to alter seaweed population and seaweed-herbivore dynamics.

Continue reading ‘The effects of ocean warming and acidification on seaweed growth and urchin grazing’

Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes

Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CTmax). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax. We found that CTmax was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CTmax declined sharply with water oxygen tension (PwO2). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax was unaffected by elevated CO2. Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes.

Continue reading ‘Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes’

Combined impacts of ocean acidification and dysoxia on survival and growth of four agglutinating foraminifera

Agglutinated foraminifera create a shell by assembling particles from the sediment and comprise a significant part of the foraminiferal fauna. Despite their high abundance and diversity, their response to environmental perturbations and climate change is relatively poorly studied. Here we present results from a culture experiment with four different species of agglutinating foraminifera incubated in artificial substrate and exposed to different pCO2 conditions, in either dysoxic or oxic settings. We observed species-specific reactions (i.e., reduced or increased chamber formation rates) to dysoxia and/or acidification. While chamber addition and/or survival rates of Miliammina fusca and Trochammina inflata were negatively impacted by either dysoxia or acidification, respectively, Textularia tenuissima and Spiroplectammina biformis had the highest survivorship and chamber addition rates with combined high pCO2 (2000 ppm) and low O2 (0.7 ml/l) conditions. The differential response of these species indicates that not all agglutinating foraminifera are well-adapted to conditions induced by predicted climate change, which may result in a shift in foraminiferal community composition.

Continue reading ‘Combined impacts of ocean acidification and dysoxia on survival and growth of four agglutinating foraminifera’

Effect of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on growth of calcifying tubeworm shells (Spirorbis spirorbis): an in-situ benthocosm approach

The calcareous tubeworm Spirorbis spirorbis is a wide-spread serpulid species in the Baltic Sea, where it commonly grows as an epibiont on brown macroalgae (genus Fucus). It lives within a Mg-calcite shell and could be affected by ocean acidification and temperature rise induced by the predicted future atmospheric CO2 increase. However, Spirorbis tubes grow in a chemically modified boundary layer around the algae, which may mitigate acidification. In order to investigate how increasing temperature and rising pCO2 may influence S. spirorbis shell growth we carried out four seasonal experiments in the ‘Kiel Outdoor Benthocosms’ at elevated pCO2 and temperature conditions. Compared to laboratory batch culture experiments the benthocosm approach provides a better representation of natural conditions for physical and biological ecosystem parameters, including seasonal variations. We find that growth rates of S. spirorbis are significantly controlled by ontogenetic and seasonal effects. The length of the newly grown tube is inversely related to the initial diameter of the shell. Our study showed no significant difference of the growth rates between ambient atmospheric and elevated (1100 ppm) pCO2 conditions. No influence of daily average CaCO3 saturation state on the growth rates of S. spirorbiswas observed. We found, however, net growth of the shells even in temporarily undersaturated bulk solutions, under conditions that concurrently favored selective shell surface dissolution. The results suggest an overall resistance of S. spirorbis growth to acidification levels predicted for the year 2100 in the Baltic Sea. In contrast, S. spirorbis did not survive at mean seasonal temperatures exceeding 24 °C during the summer experiments. In the autumn experiments at ambient pCO2, the growth rates of juvenile S. spirorbis were higher under elevated temperature conditions. The results reveal that S. spirorbis may prefer moderately warmer conditions during their early life stages but will suffer from an excessive temperature increase and from increasing shell corrosion as a consequence of progressing ocean acidification.
Continue reading ‘Effect of ocean acidification and elevated temperature on growth of calcifying tubeworm shells (Spirorbis spirorbis): an in-situ benthocosm approach’


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Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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