Posts Tagged 'oxygen'

Combined effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on the early development of the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus

Ocean acidification has become serious, and seawater hypoxia has become evident in acidified waters. The combination of such stressors may have interactive effects on the fitness of marine organisms. In order to investigate the interactive effects of seawater acidification and hypoxia on the early development of marine bivalves, the eggs and sperm of the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus were exposed to combined treatments of pH (8.1, 7.7, 7.3) and dissolved oxygen (2, 6 mg/L) for 96 h culture observation to investigate the interactive effects of seawater acidification and hypoxia on the early development of marine bivalves. Results showed that acidification and hypoxia had significant negative effects on various parameters of the early development of the thick shell mussel. However, hypoxia had no effect on fertilization rate. Significant interactions between acidification and hypoxia were observed during the experiment. Short-term exposure negatively influenced the early development of the thick shell mussel but did not affect its survival. The effects of long-term exposure to these two environmental stresses need further study.

Continue reading ‘Combined effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on the early development of the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus’

Microscale pH and dissolved oxygen fluctuations within mussel aggregations and their implications for mussel attachment and raft aquaculture

Mussel mariculture uses the natural attachment strategy of marine mussels by allowing them to aggregate on submerged rope lines that are then pulled to the surface and harvested. Mussels attach to ropes using a network of byssal threads, proteinaceous fibers that adhere to surfaces underwater using a powerful biological glue (adhesive plaque). Plaques use the surrounding seawater as a molecular trigger during adhesive curing, a process that requires a pH greater than 7.0 and an abundance of dissolved oxygen to progress. To ascertain whether mussels experience seawater conditions that are potentially harmful to mussel attachment, this study measured the conditions within mussel aggregations at a mussel farm in Washington state and, then, applied those conditions to plaques to determine whether such conditions are sufficient to weaken attachment. Seawater monitoring demonstrated that mussels infrequently experience acidic (pH <5.0) and hypoxic excursions (O2 <2 mg L–1) in the summer, especially near the seafloor. When reproduced in laboratory assays, the most extreme pH excursions observed delayed plaque strengthening when applied early in the plaque-curing process, whereas extreme excursions in hypoxia decreased adhesion strength after the adhesive had fully matured. In either case, adhesion strength was rescued after reimmersion in open-ocean seawater conditions, highlighting the resilience of the mussel holdfast to stresses other than mechanical strain. The window of susceptibility to changes in environmental conditions during and after curing could contribute to fall-off events at mussel farms, especially in the late summer months.

Continue reading ‘Microscale pH and dissolved oxygen fluctuations within mussel aggregations and their implications for mussel attachment and raft aquaculture’

Negative effects of diurnal changes in acidification and hypoxia on early-life stage estuarine fishes

Estuaries serve as important nursery habitats for various species of early-life stage fish, but can experience cooccurring acidification and hypoxia that can vary diurnally in intensity. This study examines the effects of acidification (pH 7.2–7.4) and hypoxia (dissolved oxygen (DO) ~ 2–4 mg L−1) as individual and combined stressors on four fitness metrics for three species of forage fish endemic to the U.S. East Coast: Menidia menidia, Menidia beryllina, and Cyprinodon variegatus. Additionally, the impacts of various durations of exposure to these two stressors was also assessed to explore the sensitivity threshold for larval fishes under environmentally-representative conditions. C. variegatus was resistant to chronic low pH, while M. menidia and M. beryllina experienced significantly reduced survival and hatch time, respectively. Exposure to hypoxia resulted in reduced hatch success of both Menidia species, as well as diminished survival of M. beryllina larvae. Diurnal exposure to low pH and low DO for 4 or 8 h did not alter survival of M. beryllina, although 8 or 12 h of daily exposure through the 10 days posthatch significantly depressed larval size. In contrast, M. menidia experienced significant declines in survival for all intervals of diel cycling hypoxia and acidification (4–12 h). Exposure to 12-h diurnal hypoxia generally elicited negative effects equal to, or of greater severity, than chronic exposure to low DO at the same levels despite significantly higher mean DO exposure concentrations. This evidences a substantial biological cost to adapting to changing DO levels, and implicates diurnal cycling of DO as a significant threat to fish larvae in estuaries. Larval responses to hypoxia, and to a lesser extent acidification, in this study on both continuous and diurnal timescales indicate that estuarine conditions throughout the spawning and postspawn periods could adversely affect stocks of these fish, with diverse implications for the remainder of the food web.

Continue reading ‘Negative effects of diurnal changes in acidification and hypoxia on early-life stage estuarine fishes’

Diel and tidal pCO2 × O2 fluctuations provide physiological refuge to early life stages of a coastal forage fish

Coastal ecosystems experience substantial natural fluctuations in pCO2 and dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions on diel, tidal, seasonal and interannual timescales. Rising carbon dioxide emissions and anthropogenic nutrient input are expected to increase these pCO2 and DO cycles in severity and duration of acidification and hypoxia. How coastal marine organisms respond to natural pCO2 × DO variability and future climate change remains largely unknown. Here, we assess the impact of static and cycling pCO2 × DO conditions of various magnitudes and frequencies on early life survival and growth of an important coastal forage fish, Menidia menidia. Static low DO conditions severely decreased embryo survival, larval survival, time to 50% hatch, size at hatch and post-larval growth rates. Static elevated pCO2 did not affect most response traits, however, a synergistic negative effect did occur on embryo survival under hypoxic conditions (3.0 mg L−1). Cycling pCO2 × DO, however, reduced these negative effects of static conditions on all response traits with the magnitude of fluctuations influencing the extent of this reduction. This indicates that fluctuations in pCO2 and DO may benefit coastal organisms by providing periodic physiological refuge from stressful conditions, which could promote species adaptability to climate change.

Continue reading ‘Diel and tidal pCO2 × O2 fluctuations provide physiological refuge to early life stages of a coastal forage fish’

Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on the expression of a type HBGA-like in pacific oyster

Objective: To study the effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on the expression of A type HBGA-like in pacific oysters. Methods: The HBGAs-like in the pacific oysters were isolated and extracted, and the human HBGAs were used for typing. The A type HBGAs was detected by ELISA method, and the P/N value was calculated. The content changes of A type HBGA-like in the guts and gills of pacific oysters were detected by changing the dissolved oxygen content and pH of seawater under artificial simulation conditions. Results: The HBGA-like of different tissues of oysters were classified, and the A type HBGA-like of gut and gill were selected as the main research type of subsequent experiments; the artificial simulation experiment results showed that the high pH could improve the expression of A type HBGA-like in pacific oysters gills, and the high dissolved oxygen can also improve the expression of A-type HBGA-like in pacific oysters guts. Conclusion: The results were consistent with the phenomenon that the norovirus outbreak usually occur in winter and spring, indicating that the seasonality of norovirus outbreak was correlated with the expression of A type HBGAs-like in oyster.

Continue reading ‘Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on the expression of a type HBGA-like in pacific oyster’

Ocean acidification and hypoxia can have opposite effects on rockfish otolith growth

Highlights

• Elevated CO2 and reduced dissolved oxygen have opposite effects on otolith (earstone) development in juvenile copper and blue rockfish.

• Increased CO2 levels resulted in otoliths being larger in area for a relative fish body size in blue rockfish.

• Reduced dissolved oxygen levels results in otoliths being smaller in area for a relative fish body size in both species.

Abstract

Climate change is predicted to alter ocean chemistry through warming temperatures, increases in CO2 (i.e., ocean acidification), and reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) (i.e., hypoxia). Past research has shown that early life stages of marine fishes are sensitive to all three stressors, but with sometimes different directions of response. In this study, we examined the separate effects of ocean acidification and hypoxia on otolith growth in two species of juvenile rockfish (copper rockfish, Sebastes caurinus, and blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus). Fishes were collected at settlement stage from kelp forests on the central California coast and reared in the laboratory for up to 6 months in 4 separate pH treatments (pH = 7.3, 7.6, 7.8, and a control of 8.0), simulating the effects of ocean acidification through the addition of CO2, and 4 separate dissolved oxygen treatments (DO = 2.2, 4.1, 6.0, and a control of 8.7 mg/L), simulating the effects of hypoxia. For both species, otoliths were smaller for a given fish length in response to hypoxia but were larger (trend was non-significant for copper rockfish) in response to elevated CO2. The results suggest that otolith growth may respond differently to ocean acidification and hypoxia for some species, which has implications for sensory development, ecological performance, and interpretations of the permanent record of fish growth in hard parts such as otoliths.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification and hypoxia can have opposite effects on rockfish otolith growth’

Sensitivities to global change drivers may correlate positively or negatively in a foundational marine macroalga

Ecological impact of global change is generated by multiple synchronous or asynchronous drivers which interact with each other and with intraspecific variability of sensitivities. In three near-natural experiments, we explored response correlations of full-sibling germling families of the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus towards four global change drivers: elevated CO2 (ocean acidification, OA), ocean warming (OW), combined OA and warming (OAW), nutrient enrichment and hypoxic upwelling. Among families, performance responses to OA and OW as well as to OAW and nutrient enrichment correlated positively whereas performance responses to OAW and hypoxia anti-correlated. This indicates (i) that families robust to one of the three drivers (OA, OW, nutrients) will also not suffer from the two other shifts, and vice versa and (ii) families benefitting from OAW will more easily succumb to hypoxia. Our results may imply that selection under either OA, OW or eutrophication would enhance performance under the other two drivers but simultaneously render the population more susceptible to hypoxia. We conclude that intraspecific response correlations have a high potential to boost or hinder adaptation to multifactorial global change scenarios.

Continue reading ‘Sensitivities to global change drivers may correlate positively or negatively in a foundational marine macroalga’


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Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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