Archive for the 'Presentations' Category

Ocean acidification experiment with sea hares (text & video)

In this video I went to chat with Jade Sourisse, who is a PhD student in Dr. Celia Schunters lab at HKU. Jade has been running an ocean acidification simulation experiment, and then doing some behavioural tests & tissue collection from her sea hares !

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Ocean acidification a poem by Samantha Jones

The poem “Ocean Acidification” blends science and poetry to explore one of the challenges a high-CO2 world poses to the ocean and the species, ecosystems, and human communities that depend on it.

Author Samantha Jones’ PhD research on carbon cycling in the Canadian Arctic inspired this work, which first appeared in WATCH YOUR HEAD (online) in March 2021 at watchyourhead.ca/.

Samantha is currently a PhD Candidate in Geography at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

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The ocean’s chemistry is changing. Why does it matter? (video)

Excessive CO2 emissions isn’t just an atmospheric problem, it’s changing the chemistry of our oceans through ocean acidification and impacting ocean life.

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Fisheries and Oceans Climate Change and Ocean Acidification Laboratory (FOCCOAL)(text & video)

Learn more about the Fisheries and Oceans Climate Change and Ocean Acidification Laboratory (FOCCOAL). This state-of-the-art system, developed by DFO scientists at the Pacific Biological Station, allows tight control of both seawater pH and temperature.

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Stressors of the Arctic Ocean ecosystems: improved understanding of primary production and ocean acidification

The Arctic Ocean is changing faster than any other ocean region in the world. Uptake of anthropogenic carbon, amplified warming, sea ice reduction, coastal erosion, and enhanced riverine runoff are driving important changes in the Arctic Ocean ecosystems through changes in primary production and ocean acidification. However, the current understanding of primary production and ocean acidification in the Arctic remains highly uncertain. Furthermore, projections of both processes by Earth-System Models diverge strongly in this region.

During this webinar, Dr. Terhaar presented:

(1) a modelling study that quantifies the impact of terrigenous nutrients from rivers and coastal erosions on Arctic Ocean primary production, a process that was (wrongly?) neglected so far, and

(2) results from two studies on emergent constraint on ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean that suggests that projections of Earth-System Models collectively underestimated the extent of future ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean.

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Lunch & learn series – Ocean acidification in the Gulf of Maine: issue and solutions (text & video)

We hope you enjoy this hour-long panel discussion on ocean and coastal acidification’s impact on scallops and softshell clams, methods of remediation, and future projections for the Gulf of Maine.

The talk was moderated by Dr. Libby Jewett, Director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program.

Panelists included, Dr. Samantha Siedlecki, University of Connecticut; Dr. Nichole Price, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences; and Dr. Robert J Holmberg, Downeast Institute.

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GOA-ON Webinar Series 2021: response of the Sydney rock oyster microbiome to rapidly warming and acidifying Australian estuaries (text & video)

Webinar speaker: Dr. Elliot Scanes, Chancellor’s Research Fellow, Climate Change Cluster, The University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

Description:

Climate change is impacting ecosystems and organisms worldwide. Estuaries are diverse and important aquatic ecosystems; and yet until now we have lacked information on the response of estuaries to climate change. In this seminar I will present data from a twelve-year monitoring program, involving 6200 observations of 166 estuaries along ~1100 kilometers of the Australian coastline. Estuary temperatures increased by 2.16 C on average over 12 years, at a rate of 0.2 C/year, with waters acidifying at a rate of 0.09 pH units and freshening at 0.086 PSU/year. Lagoons and rivers are warming and acidifying at the fastest rate because of shallow average depths and limited oceanic exchange. The changes measured are an order of magnitude faster than predicted by global ocean and atmospheric models, indicating that existing global models may not be useful to predict change in estuaries. Estuaries are also home to diverse ecosystems and valuable economies supported by oysters. Oysters rely on bacterial communities forming a microbiome for their health and survival. Oysters are also vulnerable to disease and this is may be exacerbated by climate change in estuaries. We found that warming and acidification can shift the microbiome of Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata), however, these effects can be ameliorated by selective breeding. We show that oyster genetic background may influence the microbiome under climate change and that future assisted evolution breeding programs could be used to enhance resilience in the oyster microbiome.

The GOA-ON webinar series has four sponsoring organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

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Ocean acidification: what happens to coral reefs? (text & video)

As the ocean acidifies, marine life comes under threat. Bubble sites in Papua New Guinea act as a time machine, allowing us to see the future we’re heading towards. How can we avert the worst effects of ocean acidification?

Learn more about ocean acidification in my film Sea of Life: https://www.seaoflifemovie.com/

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Fighting ocean acidification: Smith Cove blue carbon project (text & video)

Oyster beds, kelp, and eel grass in Smith Cove to enhance efforts against ocean acidification. The Port of Seattle is leading many efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG emissions), the most important step towards combatting ocean acidification. The Port has been very active in enhancing shoreline habitat, reducing pollution, and engagement with communities. At Smith Cove in Elliott Bay, the Port of Seattle and its partners are conducting scientific research that will contribute to building resiliency in local ecosystems related to ocean acidification. As part of the Port of Seattle’s commitment to the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (OA Alliance), the Port prepared its first ever Ocean Acidification Action Plan to detail steps we are taking to address ocean acidification. “Last year, the Port of Seattle was the first port in the world to join the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (OA Alliance), recognizing the many ways in which ocean acidification impacts the maritime sector and acknowledging the important role ports can play in leading environmental action,” said Stephanie Bowman, Port of Seattle Commissioner. “We encourage other ports to join in on these efforts.” The Smith Cove Blue Carbon Pilot Project is located on Port and City-owned aquatic lands near Terminal 91. The goal of the project is to evaluate the potential benefits of marine habitat enhancement of kelp, eelgrass, and oysters on carbon sequestration, water quality (amelioration of seawater acidification), and habitat productivity. The Port of Seattle, along with partners at the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the Puget Sound Restoration Fund (PSRF) is monitoring the site over three years for potential benefits in and around the site and includes a community-based science initiative.

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2021 Ocean acidification and hypoxia RFP informational webinar (video)

Sea Grant California, 6 August 2021. Video.

GOA-ON Webinar Series 2021: regional changes in Southern Ocean biogeochemistry due to projected carbon uptake (text & video)

Webinar speaker: Dr. Eric Mortenson, Postdoctoral Researcher at Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Hobart, Australia

Description: The Southern Ocean accounts for nearly half of the global ocean’s sink of anthropogenic carbon. Despite this important contribution, many climate models do not represent the mesoscale features that characterize the region due to limited spatial resolution. Here we apply a high-resolution ocean model that incorporates biogeochemistry with high-emission (RCP8.5) forcing in order to identify regions of pronounced change due to carbon uptake into the near future. We find that the annual uptake of carbon in the Southern Ocean south of 40° S is projected to double over the first half of the 21st century. The changes due to the increase in carbon will lead to acidification and lowering of aragonite saturation. We will present regions where changes to carbon system variables are respectively more and less pronounced to inform the siting of near-future observations.

The GOA-ON webinar series has four sponsoring organizations:

  • (1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,
  • (2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,
  • (3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and
  • (4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org
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Ocean acidification at Point Reyes National Seashore (text & video)

For video see link: https://www.nps.gov/media/video/embed.htm?id=F86474A0-52B9-4603-A725-8D265A8AB39A

Ocean acidification is rapidly changing the chemistry of ocean water worldwide and making it more difficult for many organisms to build their shells and skeletons. This video explores how park staff at Point Reyes National Seashore are working with local scientists to better understand the effects of ocean acidification, specifically on shellfish and other marine organisms.

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Climate change, the science – 5.3 – ocean acidification (text & video)

A series of videos on Climate Change by Professor Tim Lenton of the University of Exeter.

PLAYLIST: https://tinyurl.com/Climate-Change-Sc…

See playlist description for topic headings.

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Can climate change make lightning… supercharged? (text & video)

The oceans absorb a lot of CO2, leading to a variety of effects like ocean acidification. But you might not expect one of those effects: stronger lightning strikes.

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The Tipping Point Project: studying the effects of ocean acidification on pink salmon in Alaska (text & video)

This summer in Seward, Alaska a lab-based study is underway to understand the response of pink salmon to elevated acidity due to ocean acidification.  The study, led by Amanda Kelley at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, is part of a larger project looking at the ability to predict tipping points in the marine ecosystem with respect to acidity and warming, and assess the institutional opportunities and barriers to implementing OA adaptation strategies in Alaska salmon fisheries. The project is funded by NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program. Project partners include the University of Alaska Fairbanks, NOAA Fisheries, the Alaska Ocean Observing System, the University of Wyoming, the University of Alaska Anchorage, the Alutiiq Pride Marine Institute and the Meridian Institute.

Project website: Informing Adaptation Decisions for Alaska’s Salmon Fisheries | Alaska Ocean Observing System (aoos.org)

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Implementing UN SDG 14.4: minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification (text & video)

On World Ocean Day 2021, we explored how nations around the world step up and build a sustainable ocean economy in the face of cumulative ocean change. This broadly attended event co-hosted by The Ocean Foundation, the OA Alliance, and IAEA Ocean Acidification International Coordinating Center brought to you Ambassador Peter Thomson, United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Ocean, Dr. Peter Swarzenski from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) OA International Coordination Centre, and speakers from around the globe from the Pacific Coast of North America, through New Zealand, to Lebanon and Argentina.

In 2021, it is imperative that governments and civil society continue to advance the suite of science and policy actions that will be needed to support food security and sovereignty, increase the resilience of marine ecosystems, and build a sustainable ocean economy in the face of future change.

This is reflected in the UN Sustainable Development Goal Agenda and target SDG 14.3, to “Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification.” As the science, research, and observed impacts of ocean acidification continue to grow, there is a continued need for increased knowledge exchange and expertise on the substance and process for developing local, regional, and national responses in the face of cumulative ocean change.

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Le CSM invité au Collège de France à donner une conférence (in French)

Le Dr Sylvie Tambutté (Directeur de Recherche de l’équipe Physiologie et biochimie du CSM) lors de son allocution à la conférence sur ‘Le cycle du carbone dans l’océan’ au Collège de France le 18 juin 2021.

Le Dr Sylvie Tambutté, responsable de l’équipe de Physiologie corallienne a été invitée à donner une conférence au Collège de France le 18 Juin dernier. Le colloque était organisé par le Professeur Edouard Bard, titulaire de la Chaire “Évolution du climat et de l’océan” du Collège de France. La thématique portait sur « Le cycle du carbone dans l’océan » et huit orateurs ont présenté des séminaires sur des sujets incluant la perspective paléoclimatique, les flux de carbone, la modélisation biogéochimique ou encore le changement climatique et ses impacts sur l’océan.
C’est sur un aspect biologique que le Dr Tambutté est intervenu en exposant les impacts de l’acidification sur les organismes benthiques calcifiants. Après avoir introduit les bases du sujet, elle a pu aborder les résultats récents des recherches de son équipe montrant comment l’acidification impacte le processus de calcification chez les coraux de l’organisme jusqu’aux cellules et aux gènes.

Conférence du Dr S. Tambutté : “L’acidification de l’océan et les impacts sur les organismes benthiques calcifiant “


Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter : 

Documents

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EPA: coastal acidification (text & video)

Coastal Acidification” – description of one part of our climate change research that focuses on coastal acidification is. The presentation defines what coastal acidification is and why it’s important, and it describes our research on its causes and how to predict how and when acidification events are likely to occur.

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Teaching ocean climate science to 6th graders during a pandemic

Our STAY COOL for Grandkids Ocean Climate Science Education program began 5 years ago when STAY COOL co-founder David Engel created power point presentations on Ocean Warming and Ocean Acidification. He recruited two Scripps Institution of Oceanography grad students to present the lessons to 6th grade science classes. The lessons comply with the Next Generation Science Standard (NGSS) and are based on the NOAA/National Climate Assessment Educator’s lessons 1 & 2. By March 2020, the now 7 SIO grad students had presented the lessons to more than 3000 students.

In March 2020, the SIO grad students had just completed lessons at two of our schools when the COVID-19 pandemic shut everything down.

Our STAY COOL Education committee wanted to support our teachers in teaching about climate change during the pandemic. Committee member Jenny Miller invited the grad students to a Zoom meeting. They agreed to make video recordings of the two lessons, each taking half of a lesson, since our teachers wanted shorter videos for the students learning online.

Shailja Gangrade and Nathali Cordero made video recordings of Ocean Warming parts 1 and 2. Vanessa Zobell and Erica Ferrer made video recordings of Ocean Acidification parts 1 and 2. David adapted the power point slides and the grad students added some new ones of their own.

I sent the video recordings out to all of our teachers, along with a recipe for the cabbage juice pH indicator for the experiment which Vanessa demonstrates on the first Ocean Acidification video.

Meanwhile, teachers at three schools wanted the SIO grad students to present the lessons on Zoom. Monica Nelson, Shailja Gangrade and Erica Ferrer gave excellent live presentations.

All four videos are now on YouTube and links can be found on the STAY COOL website here. They are of interest to adults too and fun to watch. A link to the cabbage juice recipe is also available here.

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Ocean acidification | California Academy of Sciences (text & video)

Join Academy presenter Aya to learn about ocean acidification: what it is; how it might impact coral reefs; and what we can do to help.

The California Academy of Sciences is a renowned scientific and educational institution dedicated to exploring, explaining, and sustaining life on Earth. Based in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, it’s the only place in the world to house an aquarium, planetarium, rainforest, and natural history museum—plus cutting-edge research programs—all under one living roof.

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