Archive for the 'Events' Category

Supporting the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification

As a founding partner of the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (OA Alliance), Ocean Conservancy commits to supporting new and current members of the OA Alliance in their efforts to tackle ocean acidification. The OA Alliance is a network of governments and affiliate members (NGOs, universities, businesses, and associations) responding to the threats of ocean acidification and changing ocean conditions. OA Alliance members have agreed to take meaningful actions within their jurisdiction to develop Ocean Acidification Action Plans that assist in the implementation of UN SDG 14.3 by advancing the following five goals:

1. Advance scientific understanding of ocean acidification.
2. Take meaningful actions to reduce causes of acidification.
3. Protect the environment and coastal communities from impacts of a changing ocean.
4. Expand public awareness and understanding of acidification.
5. Build sustained support for addressing this global problem.

Continue reading ‘Supporting the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification’

Lectures tackle global poverty, ocean acidification

Amy Smith, senior lecturer and director of D-Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will speak in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room at Falmouth Public Library at 3 PM on Wednesday, June 21.

D-Lab works with people around the world to develop and advance collaborative approaches and practical solutions to global poverty challenges. The program’s mission is pursued through interdisciplinary courses, research in collaboration with global partners, technology development, and community initiatives—all of which emphasize experiential learning, real-world projects, community-led development, and scalability. Ms. Smith will talk about D-Lab’s philosophy and approach to development and will share some examples from the field.

Abby Smith, professor and head of department, a marine geochemist who works at the University of Otago in New Zealand, will speak later the same day, at 4:30 PM, in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room. Dr. Smith will present a public lecture, “Bugs in Bubbles,” on the subject of ocean acidification, which is the next global climate challenge.

Continue reading ‘Lectures tackle global poverty, ocean acidification’

Recording from the UN Oceans Conference Partnership Dialogue 3 – Minimizing and Addressing Ocean Acidification (text and video)

In the afternoon, the Conference held a partnership dialogue on “Minimizing and addressing ocean acidification”. Moderated by Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization, it featured presentations by Cardinal Peter Turkson, Head of the Dicastery for Integral Human Development, Holy See; Rahanna Juman, Deputy Director, Institute of Marine Affairs, Trinidad and Tobago; David Osborn, Director of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Environment Laboratories; and Carol Turley, Senior Scientist, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom. Prince Albert II of Monaco and Agostinho Mondlane, Minister of the Sea, Inland Waters and Fisheries, Mozambique, co-chaired the meeting.

View the recording of the session here:

http://www.unmultimedia.org/avlibrary/asset/1901/1901774/

Continue reading ‘Recording from the UN Oceans Conference Partnership Dialogue 3 – Minimizing and Addressing Ocean Acidification (text and video)’

Strengthening capacity on ocean acidification monitoring, ecosystem resilience, MPA networks in a changing climate, coral reef protection and marine spatial planning

The Swedsh Government commit to financially support to IUCN to strengthen knowledge generation and taking measures within the ocean and climate context. The support contributes to capacity development, knowledge generation and methodological development, particularly in developing countries, contributing to the implementation of SDG 14, in particular 14.2, 14.3 and 14.5.

The Swedsh Government also commit to financially support to The Ocean Foundations “Ocean acidification program”. The support contributes to training researchers in monitoring and measuring, and, if possible, contribute to create a monitoring function for ocean acidification to contribute data to the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network. The support contributes to capacity development, knowledge generation and methodological development, particularly in developing countries, contributing to the implementation of SDG 14, in particular 14.3.

The Swedsh Government financially supports the implementation of the Action Plan of the International Coral Reef Initiative, ICRI, together with France and Monaco. The support contributes to the plan of action 2016-2018 adopted in November 2016. It comprises five themes:

Continue reading ‘Strengthening capacity on ocean acidification monitoring, ecosystem resilience, MPA networks in a changing climate, coral reef protection and marine spatial planning’

Ocean Acidication Africa Network: “Let’s work together – Increasing awareness about ocean acidification”

Ocean acidification may be defined as the global decrease in ocean pH due to the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Research findings of the past decade have led to mounting concern that
rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations will cause changes in the ocean’s carbonate chemistry system, and that these changes will affect some of the most fundamental biological and geological processes of the sea.

WHO ARE WE?

OA AFRICA NETWORK is composed by scientists interested in conducting research on ocean acidification monitoring and observation in Africa. OA-AFRICA will provide a platform for sharing
ideas, designing collaborative research programs, troubleshooting challenges, and facilitate international collaboration and support. Our effort for 2017 world ocean day (June 8) is to create an
awareness of OA impact and contribute to the actualization of SDG 14.3 while promoting our network.

Continue reading ‘Ocean Acidication Africa Network: “Let’s work together – Increasing awareness about ocean acidification”’

Ocean acidification makes salmon lost ability to sense predators, according to researchers from the University of Washington

Ocean acidification has affected more than just the increase of pH in the ocean, but it also made salmon ability to sense predators decreasing. This makes salmon unable to avoid the predator, moreover, they become less afraid of the predator.

The increase of carbon dioxide uptake in the ocean from the atmosphere has resulted ocean acidification, which affected the sense of smell in the sea creatures, including salmon. This alters salmon ability to sense the predator and drawing them to the predator, according to the recent research from the University of Washington College of Environment.

Previously, salmon were able to smell their predator and avoided them. As the ocean become more acidic, they become unable to smell the danger. As a result, the salmon ability to sense predator has diminished.

The researchers, under principal investigator, the Professor from Department of Occupational and Health Sciences at the University of Washington, Evan Gallagher presented their findings of the decrease of salmon ability to sense a predator in the 2017 Ocean Acidification Symposium.The symposium was held on 22 May 2017 at the University of Washington Center for Urban Horticulture in Seattle, WA.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification makes salmon lost ability to sense predators, according to researchers from the University of Washington’

Decrease impacts of ocean acidification

By adopting the new national programs for renewable energy and energy efficiency, Algeria is committed to reducing 9% of its global consumption of energy by 2030. These ambitious programs aim to engage thermal insulation of an important housing program, as well as to convert to liquefied petroleum gas one million of light-duty vehicles and more than 20.000 buses.

Algeria, being the largest country in Africa, in the Mediterranean and in the Arab world, has one of the highest solar deposits in the world, estimated to exceed five billion GWh/year. The annual sunshine duration is estimated to be around 2 500 hours on average and could exceed 3 600 hours in some parts of the country.

By 2030, Algeria aspires to the deployment, on a large scale, of photovoltaic and wind power as well as thermal solar energy, and the integration of cogeneration, biomass, and geothermal energy. This program ultimately aims to reach the target of 27% of the electricity produced nationally generated from renewable sources of energy. The action plan of the government aspires also to reduce gas flaring to less than 1%, by 2030.

Like many countries in its region, Algeria is affected by desertification and land degradation. Most of the country is arid or semi- arid. The areas receiving more than 400 mm of rain per year are located in a narrow strip along the coast, not exceeding 150 km large. Moreover, due to climate change, yearly average rainfall declined by more than 30% over the past decades.

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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book