“In situ studies of the impacts of ocean acidification: observations, CO2 vents, and FOCE experiments”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Much of our understanding of the consequences of ocean acidification for marine and freshwater organisms derives from laboratory studies on single species. While this approach will continue to be essential, in situ studies evaluating the response of multispecies assemblages and whole communities to ocean acidification are increasingly important to “scale-up” results from laboratory studies to real assemblages in natural environments. Multispecies studies are essential to increase inference concerning both the direct and indirect effects of acidification. Population- and community-level models that integrate and scale results of laboratory and field studies are a key element in understanding the breadth of effects of ocean acidification in marine ecosystems. This session attempts to bring together in situ studies using novel experimental and modeling methods to examine the ecological effects of ocean acidification in natural communities. Observational and experimental studies exploiting spatial or temporal gradients in carbonate chemistry (e.g. latitudinal & depth-related changes, natural CO2 vents), natural experiments (e.g. hypoxia / acidification events), and perturbation experiments (e.g. Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment studies) are of particular interest. We encourage presentations on in situ studies and modeling efforts that consider the population and communities consequences of ocean acidification.

Continue reading ‘“In situ studies of the impacts of ocean acidification: observations, CO2 vents, and FOCE experiments”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

Poster session: “Ocean Acidification and Lower Trophic Levels: Identifying the Knowledge Gaps”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Ocean acidification will have dramatic impacts on phytoplankton assemblages in coastal and oceanic environments, with potential winners and losers. However, the outcome remains uncertain because we have little understanding of the physiological and ecological drivers of this change. The direct effects on phytoplankton may include impacts on carbon and macronutrient acquisition, trace metal availability, or cytosolic and metabolomic modifications, all potentially leading to subtle-to-dramatic alterations of phytoplankton growth rates, physiological health, and nutritional quality. In addition, it is unclear to what extent trophic interactions such as top down processes (grazing or facultative mixotrophy), or bacteria- phytoplankton associations, modify or shape the phytoplankton community structure under the new more acidic regime. We propose a poster session that encourages individuals to identify and discuss knowledge gaps in the broad aspects of ocean acidification and lower trophic levels.

Continue reading ‘Poster session: “Ocean Acidification and Lower Trophic Levels: Identifying the Knowledge Gaps”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

“Evolutionary effects of ocean acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Ocean acidification (OA) caused by anthropogenic CO2 emission is projected for thousands of years to come, and significant effects are predicted for many marine organisms. While significant evolutionary responses are expected during such persistent environmental change, most studies consider only short term effects. Little is known about the importance of transgenerational effects for the adaptation of affected populations. Parental effects, genetic changes in the offspring, as well as epigenetic transmission are all factors that enable increased adaptation of populations to OA. During the last few years much effort has been put into increasing our understanding of how transgenerational processes may alleviate effects and how this may affects population development during future OA. We aim at bringing together the newest developments in this fast moving field, and therefore encourage contributions from studies on evolutionary effects on anything from genetic diversity and gene expression to the development of entire populations or communities.

Continue reading ‘“Evolutionary effects of ocean acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

“Past and Present Ocean Productivity”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Variability in primary production and carbon export fluxes play a major role in carbon cycling. At present primary productivity is dramatically affected by ocean warming, changes in ocean circulation and ocean acidification. Constraining ocean responses to global changes at present time also involves further understanding of past changes. Productivity reconstructions are essential to understand the diverse factors affecting primary production in present and past oceans. Over the past decades, substantial efforts were deployed to such reconstructions and a large amount of data on export production in the past oceans has been produced. However, reliable paleoreconstructions require further research in particular regarding the use of proxies. This session aims to address present and past productivity as well as reconstructions at different time scales, including proxies for reconstructing past ocean conditions.

Continue reading ‘“Past and Present Ocean Productivity”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

“Climate Change in the Baltic Sea: impacts of warming, desalination, eutrophication and acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

The Baltic Sea is an stressful habitat that is characterized by decreasing species and genetic diversity along its salinity gradient. In addition, the Baltic Sea suffers from eutrophication, which has led to hypoxic and anoxi “dead zones.” Dead zones are associated with high CO2 partial pressures. Climate change will likely increase the duration and magnitude of hypoxic events, changes in precipitation might lower salinity and lead to pronounced shifts in species distribution along the salinity cline. Ocean acidification will be particularly severe in this habitat, owing to the low buffering capacity at low salinities and the CO2 enriched state of hypoxic systems. It is unclear at present, how multiple stressors will impact species fitness and community structure. Central questions will be: -What scenarios of climate change are likely and what are the uncertainties of model projections? -How can we design efficient strategies to monitor multiple abiotic drivers? -How do species and communities cope with abiotic scenarios expected for the future Baltic Sea? -What is the relative impact of the various abiotic drivers on species fitness and community structure? -Are Baltic populations already adapted to more severe abiotic conditions and does this make them less vulnerable to future change?

Continue reading ‘“Climate Change in the Baltic Sea: impacts of warming, desalination, eutrophication and acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

“Global climate change: ocean acidification experiments at CO2 vents”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Ocean acidification (OA) has raised concerns about its effects on marine organisms, particularly for those reliant on the generation and accumulation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) shells, tests, skeletons, and/or structures. As a consequence of OA, the ability of marine calcifiers to deposit CaCO3 is modified in response to changes in ocean geochemistry as carbonate ions are an essential substrate for biotic calcification. Most studies investigating how elevated CO2 will impact the function of marine organisms are laboratory-based, making it difficult to directly relate laboratory results to the effect that elevated CO2 will have on marine biota in situ. Field experiments, at sites with naturally-elevated CO2 conditions, such as CO2 vents, are potentially useful analogues for investigating the effect of future acidification on marine organisms and ecosystems. Vents are not ideal predictors of future oceans, owing to pH variability but they acidify seawater on sufficiently large temporal and spatial scales to integrate ecosystem processes, acting as “natural laboratories.” This session is intended to provide a summary of the main findings obtained from field-based studies and provide key lessons on the long-term effects of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems acclimatized to high pCO2.

Continue reading ‘“Global climate change: ocean acidification experiments at CO2 vents”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’

“Advances in our Global Understanding of Ocean Acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain

The abstract submission deadline is 23:59 U.S. Central Daylight Time on Friday, 10 October 2014.

Ocean acidification is a global problem already impacting our coasts and oceans at different scales that span from individual species to ecosystems to indigenous communities to human industry such as aquaculture. It is expected that the ocean’s pH will drop by 0.3 to 0.5 pH units by the end of the century; understanding the complex chemical and biological impacts of ocean acidification will allow predicting responses of the changing marine landscape. In this session we bring together marine chemists as well as marine aquatic ecologists and biologists to discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the processes and mechanisms affecting the global ocean. We invite presentations from observational, experimental, and modeling research. We encourage a global perspective, with presentations from diverse ecosystems and settings. As ocean acidification is a global condition, its effects are seen locally. Thus, understanding across scales is critical to understand either local or global implications.

Continue reading ‘“Advances in our Global Understanding of Ocean Acidification”, 2015 Aquatic Sciences Meeting, 22-27 February 2015, Granada, Spain’


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