Archive for the 'Events' Category



How to rescue the oceans from progressive acidification?

Event: Saturday 14 September, 2-3pm, Auckland, New Zealand

Join artist Charlotte Graham and University of Auckland Professor of Biological Sciences Te Kura Mātauranga Koiora, Dr. Mary Sewell, as they discuss Graham’s Whakawaikawa Moana/Acidic Oceans, 2019.

Whakawaikawa Moana/Acidic Oceans is a mirror and text installation that addresses the phenomenon of ocean acidification by summoning the world (AO) and its natural elements under environmental stress. Employing lighting to project words in many directions evoking the multidirectional power of the winds and the sun shimmering on the ocean surface, the work speaks of acidic waters compromising marine life.

Graham will discuss her work in light of scientific research on ocean acidification and the pair will explore scientific solutions to restore balance to our oceans.

Charlotte Graham (Pare Hauraki, Pare Waikato, Ngāti Kotimana) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses different materials to engage in indigenous dialogue. Graham’s work has addressed social, cultural and political issues for more than twenty years.

Dr. Mary Sewell’s recent research has focused on the impact of ocean acidification on early development in sea urchins and green-shell mussels, from habitats including the Hauraki Gulf, Firth of Thames and coastal regions of Antarctica.

Continue reading ‘How to rescue the oceans from progressive acidification?’

How ocean acidification works hand-in-hand with warming and other global change stressors to promote toxic Pseudo-nitzschia harmful algal blooms along the West Coast

Toxic harmful algal blooms are an increasing problem globally, and the West Coast of the U.S. is no exception. In particular, massive neurotoxic blooms of the domoic acid-producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia have recently appeared that are larger, more frequent, longer lasting, and much more toxic than any that have been historically recorded. In recent years, these blooms have caused extensive damage to our Dungeness crab fishery, and they pose an increasing threat to other shellfish and finfish industries. It has become clear that this unprecedented intensification of toxic domoic acid events is very likely linked to ocean environmental change. For instance, research in my laboratory has shown that ocean acidification can benefit the growth and increase the toxicity of many harmful algal bloom species, including Pseudo-nitzschia. At present day atmospheric CO2 concentrations, obtaining enough dissolved CO2from the water to support growth can be a problem for Pseudo-nitzschia, which can thus be “carbon dioxide-limited”, and so it may actually directly benefit from higher CO2 levels. There is a definite potential for future CO2 fertilization of more frequent and more intense toxic algal blooms. However, we are now realizing that to understand and predict how ocean acidification will influence harmful algal blooms, we also need to consider a number of other interacting global change impacts. These other direct and indirect human disturbances include sea surface warming, losses of dissolved oxygen, stratification of the surface ocean, and modification of natural nutrient cycles by urban and agricultural pollution. For instance, in addition to ocean acidification, we have also shown that ocean warming strongly promotes domoic acid production by Pseudo-nitzschia. I will discuss the complex network of interactions between ocean acidification and these many other global change multiple stressors that my lab group is currently working to understand, in order to help predict and perhaps mitigate the tremendously damaging toxic algal blooms that increasingly threaten our coastal fisheries and marine food webs.

Continue reading ‘How ocean acidification works hand-in-hand with warming and other global change stressors to promote toxic Pseudo-nitzschia harmful algal blooms along the West Coast’

Upcoming webinar: Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification

Time: 25 September, 9:00am Europe Summer Time (Berlin, GMT+02:00)

Description: The fourth webinar of the Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification will be held on Wednesday 25 September at 9h00 Central European Summer Time. Dr Peter Thor, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), will present on Sweden’s plans to address and support SDG14.3, including through a national ocean acidification monitoring programme (Voluntary Commitment #19499). This will be followed by a talk by Dr Dorothee Bakker, University of East Anglia, UK, who will present the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT; Voluntary Commitment #20464). The presentations will be followed by a discussion about opportunities for the COA on OA to work together to advance progress on SDG 14.3

Continue reading ‘Upcoming webinar: Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification’

Upcoming webinar: We’ve got chemistry! Leveraging partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to advance ocean acidification and MPA science

Event Date: Wednesday, September 25 at 1 pm US EDT/10 am US PDT/5 pm UTC

Description: Marine protected areas (MPAs), sanctuaries, and reserves offer refuge to a wide variety of marine species, but can they also protect vulnerable organisms from the effects of ocean acidification (OA) and other climate-related stressors? Increasingly, OA scientists and MPA managers are working together to explore questions of adaptability in marine protected areas to explore this question and sharing their ideas on a dynamic new online platform called the OA Information Exchange (OAIE). In this webinar, we will: 1) provide an orientation to the OAIE to the MPA community and other new users, 2) describe how innovative collaborations between researchers and volunteer scientists are advancing both OA and MPA science in the Oregon Marine Reserves, and 3) provide examples of efforts to document changing ocean conditions and understand potential impacts of ecosystem change in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including how the development of a sentinel site for ocean acidification on the Olympic Coast supports OA coordination and collaboration in Washington.

Continue reading ‘Upcoming webinar: We’ve got chemistry! Leveraging partnerships and the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange to advance ocean acidification and MPA science’

Upcoming webinar from the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification: Unveiling OA Action Plans

Time: 14 August, 11:00am Pacific Standard Time

Description: OA Alliance Members will provide an overview of process and content for creating their government lead OA Action Plans, including the tangible actions they are taking to respond to the threat of ocean acidification.

With presentations from:
New Zealand OA Community
Government of the Netherlands
State of Oregon
City of Vancouver, Canada
Makah Tribe

Continue reading ‘Upcoming webinar from the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification: Unveiling OA Action Plans’

C-CAN webinar: Understanding acidification risks across habitats through a 10-site intertidal network

Presented by: Dr. Micah Horwith, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Aquatic Resources

Time: August 7, 10 to 11pm CEST

Description: In 2015, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources established the Acidification Nearshore Monitoring Network. This program – ANeMoNe – collects co-located data on water quality, shellfish, and aquatic vegetation at 10 intertidal sites that span greater Puget Sound and the Washington Coast. ANeMoNe is designed to support hypothesis-driven research through replicated field experiments, and to measure the progress of ocean warming and acidification over tidelands. Here, we offer a survey of work from across the network, which has explored 1) the effects of eelgrass on local water chemistry, 2) the potential of eelgrass as a refuge for shellfish, and 3) regional differences in pH and other parameters of water quality. Through persistent monitoring and limited-term experiments, ANeMoNe fosters collaboration between agency and academic scientists, tribes, and community members invested in understanding and planning for rapid environmental change.

Continue reading ‘C-CAN webinar: Understanding acidification risks across habitats through a 10-site intertidal network’

Upcoming webinars hosted by the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification

Webinar 1: Coral Reefs in a High CO2 World: How are coral reefs experiencing acidification combined with additional stressors and what can governments do about it?

With presentations from:
NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
Brazilian Ocean Acidification Network (tentative)
Coral Reef Alliance
State of Hawaii Coral Program Lead

Webinar 2: Unveiling OA Action Plans: Members provide an overview of process and content for creating their government lead OA Action Plans including the tangible actions they are taking to respond to the threat of ocean acidification.

With presentations from:
New Zealand OA Community
Government of the Netherlands
State of Oregon
City of Vancouver, Canada

Continue reading ‘Upcoming webinars hosted by the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book