Archive for the 'Courses and training' Category

What’s the big deal about ocean acidification?

Fifth-grade students from an inland community discover a local connection to our ocean

Download PDF

We have only one ocean and it is inextricably linked to human health, yet research shows most elementary students do not understand the one-ocean concept (Mogias 2019). Additionally, the ocean—and its problems—may seem unrelated to students’ lives even though it provides half of the oxygen we breathe (via plankton); manufactures our weather; supplies food and drinking water; and makes a global economy possible. “Enhancing interactions with the ocean through experiential learning could be the most effective way of improving ocean literacy as well as marine citizen- and stewardship” (Guest et al. 2015). So, we—a literacy consultant and a children’s author—came together to show educators how STEM and language arts could be combined in ocean experiential learning.

In a series of 12 project-based learning lessons, a group of seven fifth-grade students who live 200 miles from the coast explored their personal connections to our ocean. After completing a unit on the role of water in Earth’s surface processes, the students investigated ocean acidification and how this pervasive ocean problem impacts their local community.
We had three basic goals for our students:

  • Learn the process of ocean acidification and its impact on the environment.
  • Understand the link between their inland community and the ocean.
  • Form meaningful emotional relationships with the ocean and take action on ocean sustainability.

The following lessons may be scaled up for an entire class. For example, the teacher could work with a rotation of small groups while other students work collaboratively on related tasks. Alternatively, the teacher could provide whole-group focus lessons (or, in some cases, directions) and then confer with small groups as they engage in the conversations and other activities described here

Continue reading ‘What’s the big deal about ocean acidification?’

IOC/OSS/OTGA/SPC & Ocean Foundation: ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands

Date: 21 February – 10 April 2022

There is no cost to attend the online training. Find registration information at www.oceanfdn.org/register or register directly through this link: https://forms.gle/kvniZnMFNysmreX36

Summary

Ocean acidification (OA) is a global environmental issue caused by the continuing release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This course covers the causes of ocean acidification, associated chemical changes, its effects on marine organisms and the global ocean, how to measure ocean acidification, how to plan appropriate observations in the field and experiments in the laboratory, and the political response to the threat of ocean acidification on the global, regional and local scale.

Learning Outcomes

  1. You will be able to communicate the concept of ocean acidification, its causes, and associated chemical changes,
  2. You will become familiar with ocean acidification’s effects on marine organisms and the global ocean, 
  3. You will understand how to measure carbonate chemistry parameters in the lab and in the field,
  4. You will be able to perform quality control and assurance on data and understand how to submit it to global data portals,
  5. You will be able to plan appropriate observations in the field and experiments in the laboratory,
  6. You will become familiar with the resources and online groups in the ocean acidification community.

Course Topics

  • Introduction to ocean acidification
  • The ocean carbonate system
  • Data quality and management
  • SDG 14.3.1 Indicator Methodology
  • Laboratory experiments for ocean acidification
  • Chemical observations in the field
  • Biological observations in the field

Target audience(s) from Pacific Island Countries and Territories:

  • Scientists of all career stages and fields, particularly biology and chemistry
  • Governmental representatives with an environmental portfolio
  • Others who want to address ocean acidification

Schedule (subject to change):

Week 1: 21-27 Feb 2022

  • Welcome
  • Module 1: Introduction to Ocean Acidification

Week 2: 28 Feb – 6 March 2022

  • Module 2: The Ocean Carbonate System

Week 3: 7 – 13 March 2022

  • Module 3: Data Quality and Management
  • Module 4: 14.3.1 SDG Indicator Methodology

Week 4: 14 – 20 March 2022

  • Module 5: Laboratory experiments for OA

Week 5: 21 – 27 March 2022

  • Module 5: (cont.) Laboratory experiments for OA

Week 6: 28 March – 3 April 2022

  • Module 6: Chemical observations in the field
  • Module 7: Biological observations in the field

Week 7: 4 – 10 April 2022

  • Module 7: (cont.) Biological observations in the field

Continue reading ‘IOC/OSS/OTGA/SPC & Ocean Foundation: ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands’

The Ocean Foundation presents a free online course: ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands

Date: 21 February – 10 April 2022

Registration: There is no cost to attend the online training. For more information and a link to register, please visit: https://oceanfdn.org/register

Overview: Ocean acidification – the unprecedented decline in the ocean’s pH as a result of carbon dioxide emissions – poses significant threats to ecosystems and economies in Pacific Island Countries and Territories. This training course, held remotely via the Ocean Teacher Global Academy’s Ocean Acidification course, will bring together scientists and anyone else who is interested in learning more about the chemistry and effects of ocean acidification on the region. While the first few lessons are designed to introduce participants to the topic of ocean acidification, even attendees familiar with this issue will take away additional information from expert lecturers on chemistry, biology, and actions to address ocean acidification. Live discussion sections via Zoom will allow participants to ask any questions, exchange ideas, develop their own research plan, and build a network with other participants throughout the Pacific Islands. Participants should finish the course with a comprehensive understanding of the implications for ocean acidification and knowledge of how they can contribute to addressing ocean acidification in their own line of work.

Course Topics:

  • Introduction to ocean acidification
  • The ocean carbonate system
  • Data quality and management
  • SDG 14.3.1 Indicator Methodology
  • Laboratory experiments for ocean acidification
  • Chemical observations in the field
  • Biological observations in the field

Intended Participants (from Pacific Island Countries and Territories): Scientists of all career stages and fields, particularly biology and chemistry; governmental representatives with an environmental portfolio; others who want to address ocean acidification

Organizers:

  • The Pacific Community (SPC), Fiji
  • University of the South Pacific (USP), Fiji
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA
  • Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO
  • University of Otago, New Zealand
  • National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand
  • University of Hawaii, USA
Continue reading ‘The Ocean Foundation presents a free online course: ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands’

Basic training course on ocean acidification

Date: 14 – 19 March 2022

Location: The Kristineberg Marine Research Station, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Deadline for applications: 24 January 2022

Background Information: The course will be based on previous courses on ocean acidification held as part of the activities of the IAEA Peaceful Uses Initiative project “Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre” (OA-ICC) and partners, and the document “Guide to Best Practices in Ocean Acidification Research and Data Reporting” (see http://www.iaea.org/ocean-acidification/page.php?page=2194).

Purpose: To train early-career scientists and researchers entering the ocean acidification field with the goal to assist them to be able to measure and manipulate seawater carbonate chemistry, set up pertinent experiments, avoid typical pitfalls and ensure comparability with other studies, in a sustainable way.

Expected Outputs: Increased capacity to measure and study ocean acidification and increased networking among scientists working on ocean acidification. Initiate/deepen connections with international networks such as the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON).

Scope and Nature: The training will include lectures in plenary and hands-on experiments in smaller groups (the level will depend on the basic knowledge of the selected participants). Subjects to be covered include: theoretical aspects of ocean acidification from chemistry to society, the characterization of the seawater carbonate chemistry including making TRIS buffer, calibration of pH electrodes, measurement of alkalinity, software packages used to calculate CO2 system parameters, key aspects of ocean acidification experimental design, such as manipulation of seawater chemistry, biological perturbation approaches, and lab- and field-based methods for measuring organism responses to seawater chemistry changes, including nuclear and isotopic techniques.

Participation: The course is open to 15 trainees. Priority will be given to early-career scientists who begin to work in the ocean acidification area. Experts interested in starting ocean acidification studies would be welcome, space permitting. As identified by the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) European hub, there is a strong need for capacity building in Europe. For this training, priority will be given to European but applications from other countries are welcome.

Qualifications: The participants should have a university degree in marine chemistry, biology, oceanography or a related scientific field, and should be currently involved in or planning to set up ocean acidification studies.

Application Procedure: Selection will be based on merit and interest. Your applications should include:

  • A motivation letter with a short description of your research interest, why you would like to participate, and your plans regarding present and future ocean acidification research (max one A4 page)
  • CV with publication list
  • Applications must be received by not later than 24 January 2022 for the attention of the course organizer, Dr. Sam Dupont (sam.dupont@bioenv.gu.se).
Continue reading ‘Basic training course on ocean acidification’

The pH scale and the chemistry of ocean acidification

Ocean acidification provides a useful and engaging context to explore your learners’ understanding of the pH scale

This resource explores the concept of changing pH linked to ocean acidification and can be used as a worksheet to aid understanding during the lesson or as homework. Extension questions provide more challenge and delve into other aspects of chemistry linked to ocean acidification. They lead to a research task where learners can present what they have learnt to explain some of the consequences of ocean acidification on marine organisms.

Sustainability in chemistry

The Sustainable Development Goals logo

This resource accompanies the Education in Chemistry article Tie ocean acidification into your chemistry topics where you will find more support and suggestions for how to connect your current chemistry teaching with UN sustainable development goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources. Use the goal to add further context to this resource.

Teacher notes

The download includes answers to all of the questions in the worksheet. 

Question 4 gives learners an opportunity to apply their knowledge and practise a longer-answer question. A structure strip to support this question is provided. Structure strips give scaffolded prompts and help overcome ‘fear of the blank page’. Learners stick the strip into the margin of their exercise book, or a sheet of A4 paper, and write alongside it. Read more in Improve students’ understanding through writing.

A student sheet and teacher notes available as PDFs or MS Word docs. Download All

The extension questions provide further challenge for learners within the topic. Question 7c asks learners to consider equilibrium and they may need a prompt to think about Le Chatelier’s principle if attempting this question.

Question 9 asks learners to undertake further research and present their findings as a poster or infographic, you could suggest alternative formats for this. You could also give learners more of a scaffold with prompts, eg:

  • Choose a sea creature that will be affected by ocean acidification.
  • State why that creature is affected.
  • Identify what might happen to other creatures, either who eat this organism or who are eaten by it.
  • Use the information on carbonic acid in this worksheet to help you include the chemistry behind your points.

The references below contain a wealth of information, in an accessible form for learners and you may wish to give these, either as a starting point or for sole use in this piece of work.

Link carbon-neutral alternatives to your lessons on ocean acidification and enhance your teaching in this topic area with the articles in this series on Goals 7 (sustainable energy) and 8 (biofuels).

Continue reading ‘The pH scale and the chemistry of ocean acidification’

Curso regional de capacitación y entrenamiento sobre medición del sistema de carbonatos para la evaluación del indicador de acidez media del mar (ODS 14.3.1) (in Spanish)

Enroll

“In the framework of the long-standing collaboration between Monaco Environment Laboratories and IOC-UNESCO, and with the support of INVEMAR of Colombia, a regional training course on the measurement of carbonate systems as an indicator of mean marine acidity (ODS 14.3.1) was developed  under the ongoing technical cooperation project RLA7025, carried out at the IOC-UNESCO Ocean Teacher Global Academy platform.

This training aimed to provide knowledge and tools to 68 specialists from the region in sampling and chemical analysis of pH, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon of coastal waters, following a standardized protocol developed by REMARCO in the region for SDG 14.3.1 reporting.

Along with the technical experts, this training course involved the participation of SDG 14 national focal points, who were trained on how to prepare and validate content for SDG 14.3.1 data reporting.

The training course is hosted on the IOC/UNESCO Global Ocean Teacher Academy platform and will therefore be accessible as an e-learning course for all specialists in the region.”

Links:

  1. INVEMAR | Colombia 50% Mar
  2. INVEMAR | Colombia 50% Mar
Continue reading ‘Curso regional de capacitación y entrenamiento sobre medición del sistema de carbonatos para la evaluación del indicador de acidez media del mar (ODS 14.3.1) (in Spanish)’

Human impact on coral

In this live lesson, students will speak with a coral scientist about how human behaviour affects the coral ecosystem, and conduct two short investigations into how increased carbon dioxide levels are harming reefs.

PART OF: AXA CORAL LIVE 2021

Learning Outcomes

  • Insight into the work of a marine scientist
  • Explore how human activity is affecting the reef
  • Understand how changes in the environment can harm individual organisms and cause entire species to go extinct

Preparation

If you have never joined a live lesson before, see the guidance hub, where you will find technical and educational support.

Live lessons work best when students have some prior knowledge and have prepared questions. You can select from any of the STEAM activities in the Coral Oceans collection or teach the one-off Coral Live prep lesson.

This lesson is based around the Ocean acidification in a cup and Dissolving coral in vinegar activities and if your students are following live, you will need to gather these activity resources in advance.

Questions generated by your class can be submitted via the Encounter Live tab in your Encounter Edu profile.

Session outline

1. Introduction (5 mins)

Maisy will open the session with a welcome and brief introduction to the expedition.

2. Subject knowledge (15 mins)

Maisy will ask about how human activity is harming coral reefs and introduce students to some of the threats to the coral reef including coral bleaching, ocean acidification and coastal developments.

3. Activity (15 mins)

Maisy will begin demonstrating the two activities, Ocean acidification in a cup and Dissolving coral in vinegar. Students can follow along in real-time. During this time, you can submit your students’ questions via the Live chat.

4. Q&A (15 mins)

After completing the activity Maisy will answer some of the questions students have submitted before suggesting other Coral Live activities you might like to try.

Continue reading ‘Human impact on coral’

New ocean acidification training hub launched to tackle growing threat

"
Pacific Islands scientists during an ocean acidification training workshop in Suva, Fiji
Image credit: The Ocean Foundation

A new Suva-based Regional Ocean Acidification Training Hub launched today will combat ocean acidification and its effects in the Pacific region.

Ocean acidification is caused by fossil fuels releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere which is then absorbed by the ocean. This CO2 when combined with seawater produces carbonic acid, which turns the seawater more acidic, a process called ocean acidification.

The earth’s oceans are absorbing more carbon dioxide (CO2) than ever before, becoming 30% more acidic over the last 250 years and projected to acidify by 150- 200% by 2100.

Ocean acidification intensifies coral bleaching and interrupts the lifecycle of shellfish, affecting fish and other large marine creatures and the entire marine food chain. And with coral reefs facing bleaching due to warmer seas and damage from pollution, ocean acidification is making things worse. 

“People in the Pacific depend on the ocean for their livelihoods”, said Dr Katy Soapi, Pacific Community Centre for Ocean Science (PCCOS) Coordinator.

“Every additional tonne of COemission will lead to increased levels of ocean acidification and this will have huge impacts on coral reefs, shellfish, our food security, biodiversity, tourism and fisheries”, said Dr Soapi.

The Ocean Acidification Training Hub will enhance and sustain ocean acidification monitoring and research capacity in the region. Through mentoring, skills development and training, the hub will equip the Pacific region with the skills necessary to successfully implement a region-wide ocean acidification observing programme.

“We will also have two Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) in a box kits for analysis of ocean acidification that will be used by the Hub for training.  There will also be five kits given as grants to eligible countries to develop their capacity in this area. These box kits contain everything needed to analyse and monitor ocean acidification,” said Dr Soapi.

Over the next three years the Hub will offer training courses on ocean acidification through the Ocean Teachers Global Academy training platform, ocean acidification monitoring equipment grants, and a number of Masters Student Fellowships for Pacific Islanders researchers.

“Having the Ocean Acidification Training Hub based in Suva means we can develop and share the knowledge and skills needed to deal with this issue. This is just the start, this Hub will have huge benefits for people in the region”, said Alexis Valauri-Orton, Program Manager with The Ocean Foundation.  

The Hub will be managed by the Pacific Community (SPC) and co-hosted with the Institute of Applied Science at the University of the South Pacific, in partnership with the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and the University of Otago.

For further information on the hub, please contact Dr Katy Soapi katysspc.int”>katys@spc.int.

Continue reading ‘New ocean acidification training hub launched to tackle growing threat’

Tie ocean acidification into your chemistry topics

Link UN sustainable development goal 14 to your teaching of dissolved ions, acids and the pH scale

A digital illustration of a swimming turtle with a 14 on its shell
Help your students see the impact that excess carbon dioxide has on the world’s oceans. Source: © hitandrun/Debut Art

Students at 14–16 will be familiar with the composition of the atmosphere and that carbon dioxide is one of the most significant greenhouse gases. The chemistry of the atmosphere and the impact of human activity on climate change is a key area of the 14–16 curriculum.

This article is part of the Sustainability in chemistry series, developed to help you integrate the UN’s sustainable development goals into your teaching of chemistry. It supports Goal 14: conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.

The oceans play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by ‘mopping up’ some of the excess carbon dioxide we produce. They cover 70% of the Earth’s surface and have absorbed about a third of the carbon dioxide emitted since the industrial revolution. This links with Goal 14: conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.

Put it in context

Goal 14 is a good chance to introduce an important context when teaching about the atmosphere and climate change, because people tend to focus on the air around us. They’ll consider emissions from cars and factories and understand the importance of trees in the rainforest, but often ignore interactions between the atmosphere and oceans.

Student worksheet, for age range 14–16

Use this worksheet to explore and develop understanding of the pH scale and apply it in the context of ocean acidification. Extension questions provide more challenge and delve into other aspects of chemistry linked to ocean acidification, leading to a research task on the consequences for marine organisms.

Download the student worksheet as MS Word or pdf and the teacher notes (including answers) as MS Word or pdf.

Continue reading ‘Tie ocean acidification into your chemistry topics’

Virtual workshop 2021: session 1 talk 2, essential ocean variables

An introduction to sustained ocean observations and Essential Ocean Variables as a system to improve scientific knowledge about the ocean climate and ecosystems, human impact, and human vulnerability.
Continue reading ‘Virtual workshop 2021: session 1 talk 2, essential ocean variables’

Virtual workshop 2021: session 2 talk 1, monitoring ocean acidification equipment

Overview of how to assemble and connect Ocean Acidification monitoring equipment. The focus will be on pH sensor connectivity, downloading the data files, and familiarising yourself with the suite of cables.
Continue reading ‘Virtual workshop 2021: session 2 talk 1, monitoring ocean acidification equipment’

Virtual workshop 2021: session 3 talk 2 monitoring ocean acidification, learning from the data

We will present some of the data collected from CMEP OA Kits so far and discuss how this data has been used to identify drivers of pH on Barrier Reefs.
Continue reading ‘Virtual workshop 2021: session 3 talk 2 monitoring ocean acidification, learning from the data’

Virtual workshop 2021: session 3 talk 1 monitoring ocean acidification data processing (video & text)

We will demonstrate how to process, quality control and analyse the data collected by the pH and CTDO sensors. We will also give you some recommendations on how to present your data when writing reports.
Continue reading ‘Virtual workshop 2021: session 3 talk 1 monitoring ocean acidification data processing (video & text)’

State legislation on ocean & coastal acidification webinar (video)

March 19, 2020, from 2pm – 4 pm Eastern

Holly GalavottiU.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Mike MolnarCoastal States OrganizationJustine KimballPh.D, Senior Program Manager, California Ocean Protection CouncilCaren Braby, Marine Resources Program Manager, Oregon Department of Fish and WildlifeDonald WitherillDirector, Division of Environmental Assessment, Maine Department of Environmental Protection

Summary: Ocean and coastal acidification threatens marine ecosystems and the coastal communities that rely on them. The U.S. EPA’s Ocean and Coastal Acidification Program promotes awareness and conducts research and long-term monitoring to mitigate impacts of acidification and develop solutions. States play a critical role in guarding their coastlines against local causes of acidification.

Hear from three states who have successfully enacted state legislation on ocean and coastal acidification as they share their experience and discuss actions that have been implemented to address acidification in their state.

Flyer for the State Legislation on Ocean & Coastal Acidification Webinar

Continue reading ‘State legislation on ocean & coastal acidification webinar (video)’

Communicating OA science to policy makers (webinar recording)

On October 20 and 21, the OA Alliance and The Ocean Foundation co- hosted a Communications Workshop for OA Scientists.

This virtual workshop provided an overview of best practices in communicating OA science to decision and policy makers and other stakeholders, drawing upon lessons learned and experiences from our national and subnational government members.  It also described how governments are increasingly tackling ocean acidification through legislation, climate action strategies and other international frameworks and specifically—exploring how scientists and in-region stakeholders can most effectively contribute to those processes.

This workshop was meant for scientists working on ocean acidification who are interested in learning how to interact with policymakers.

Continue reading ‘Communicating OA science to policy makers (webinar recording)’

Call for applications: Climate change and acidification of the Mediterranean Sea – from air-sea interactions to the impacts on marine ecosystems

Dates: 16 Apr 2020 to 24 Apr 2020

Venue: ENEA Station for Climate Observations and Marine Protected Area of Isole Pelagie, Lampedusa, Italy

This course is organized by ENEA – Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development – in cooperation with IAEA – Ocean Acidification Coordination Centre and the University of Gent, and within and in collaboration with the marine Protected Area of Isole Pelagie. The aim of the School is to promote multilateral cooperation amongst different partners through training and research of young scientists from European and Developing Countries, on the theme of Climate Change. Being the education the core of the programme, this school will be based on multidisciplinary inputs in Climate Change research and didactics, considering three main compartments, Atmosphere, Ocean and Marine Ecosystems.

Continue reading ‘Call for applications: Climate change and acidification of the Mediterranean Sea – from air-sea interactions to the impacts on marine ecosystems’

Scientists learn how to monitor ocean acidification during IAEA training course

DSC_0868.JPG

Photo credit: IAEA

Fifteen participants from three different IAEA Technical Cooperation projects met this week at the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco to receive training on ocean acidification monitoring. Participants learned how to measure pH and total alkalinity using a set of simplified methodologies developed by The Ocean Foundation, the IAEA OA-ICC and experts in the field in the framework of the Global Ocean Acidification Observing network (GOA-ON). The training aimed to empower participants to start ocean acidification monitoring in their countries, report toward the UN Sustainable Development Goal 14.3.1 on ocean acidification, and, ultimately, to inspire mitigation and adaptation actions. The course included both lectures and practical sessions on carbonate chemistry, sampling design and data quality and assurance, as well as biological impacts, experimental design, and opportunities for international networking and collaboration.

Continue reading ‘Scientists learn how to monitor ocean acidification during IAEA training course’

Call for applications: Climate change and acidification of the Mediterranean Sea: from air-sea interactions to the impacts on marine ecosystems

This course is organized by ENEA – Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development – in cooperation with IAEA – Ocean Acidification Coordination Centre and the University of Gent, and within and in collaboration with the marine Protected Area of Isole Pelagie. The aim of the School is to promote multilateral cooperation amongst different partners through training and research of young scientists from European and Developing Countries, on the theme of Climate Change. Being the education the core of the programme, this school will be based on multidisciplinary inputs in Climate Change research and didactics, considering three main compartments, Atmosphere, Ocean and Marine Ecosystems.

Continue reading ‘Call for applications: Climate change and acidification of the Mediterranean Sea: from air-sea interactions to the impacts on marine ecosystems’

Workshop for teachers: carbonated water – teaching climate science and ocean acidification

A professional development workshop for middle and high school teachers.

Participants in this workshop will:
• Gain knowledge of climate change and ocean acidification in the Pacific Northwest
• Explore sources of local environmental data and work towards incorporating data into inquiry-based science learning experiences;
• Receive materials and activities included in the Ocean Sciences Sequence (OSS) curriculum on Climate Change developed by UC Berkeley Lawrence Hall of Science
• Become familiar with and utilize Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) to foster “three dimensional” learning through Cross Cutting Concepts, Core Disciplinary Ideas, and Science and Engineering Practices.

Continue reading ‘Workshop for teachers: carbonated water – teaching climate science and ocean acidification’

Training course: Sistemas de carbonatos – documentación de conjuntos de datos, su análisis y visualización geográfica, en el marco del Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible 14.3 para minimizar los impactos de acidificación de los océanos (in Spanish)

Summary

El curso proporcionará las herramientas necesarias para evaluar la calidad de los datos QA/QC que permitan seleccionar sólo aquellos que cumplan con la calidad requerida para el indicador ODS 14.3.1. Aplicar las mejores prácticas para estandarizar y organizar los datos de acuerdo a la metodología 14.3.1. Identificar cuales son las herramientas de análisis más apropiadas y utilizarlas adecuadamente. Por último los participantes aprenderán a visualizar los resultados de los análisis de manera que sean entendibles para públicos no especializados, incrementando las capacidades en los países para reportar el indicador.
Continue reading ‘Training course: Sistemas de carbonatos – documentación de conjuntos de datos, su análisis y visualización geográfica, en el marco del Objetivo de Desarrollo Sostenible 14.3 para minimizar los impactos de acidificación de los océanos (in Spanish)’


  • Reset

Subscribe

OA-ICC Highlights


%d bloggers like this: