Archive for the 'Media coverage' Category

New ocean acidification monitoring station in American Samoa

news-fagatele-pco2buoy

Credit: PacIOOS

NOAA, the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS), and partners have launched a new buoy in Fagatele Bay within the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa to measure carbon dioxide and other important seawater characteristics within the bay’s vibrant tropical coral reef ecosystem.

“This new monitoring effort in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean will not only advance our understanding of changing ocean chemistry but will also help us communicate these changes to diverse stakeholders in the Pacific Islands and across the United States,” said Derek Manzello, coral ecologist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory.

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CO₂ emissions from Silicon Valley and Salinas linked to ocean acidification in Monterey Bay

Winds transport the emissions from urban hubs, likely making waters acidic and unfavorable for many sea creatures.

Carbon dioxide, one of the main greenhouse gases linked to climate change, is not just a global problem, but a local one too, according to a recent study.

Scientists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) report that CO₂ emissions from Silicon Valley and Salinas Valley are blowing over to Monterey Bay, a region renowned for its rich marine life. They suspect this CO₂ will get absorbed by the ocean, making the waters more acidic and unfavorable for many sea creatures.

“This is a first-of-its-kind study to talk about CO₂ from urban sources affecting acidification in coastal waters,” said Richard Feely, a chemical oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who wasn’t involved in the research. “One might expect to see the same thing occur along the East Coast and places where there is high industrial activity near the coast.”

Continue reading ‘CO₂ emissions from Silicon Valley and Salinas linked to ocean acidification in Monterey Bay’

Reports to Arctic Council confirm rapid warming, ocean acidification

New observations confirm continued rapid warming in the Arctic, driving many of the changes underway in the region, including loss of sea ice and glacier coverage, as well as changes in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. This affects Arctic communities and economies, according to a new Climate Change Update from the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP).

Arctic Ocean acidification is an emerging threat – with models predicting the possible collapse of some important Arctic commercial and subsistence fisheries, according to an Arctic Ocean Acidification Assessment. The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to important and valuable fisheries. They yield a tenth of the global commercial catch, and subsistence fisheries provide vital nutritional and cultural services to Arctic residents.

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Bonamici bill to promote health of oceans, estuaries moves to house floor

Today the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee approved Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici’s bipartisan Coastal and Ocean Acidification Stressors and Threats (COAST) Research Act.

The COAST Research Act will help coastal communities cope with ocean and coastal acidification by expanding scientific research and monitoring of changing ocean conditions. A video of Bonamici’s remarks at the markup can be found here.

“Our oceans and estuaries are facing the consequences of our inaction to reduce anthropogenic carbon emissions,” Bonamici said at the markup. “We know that even if carbon dioxide emissions are halted today, many of the reciprocal effects for our oceans will continue to occur over the course of the next few decades.”

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Jaime Herrera Beutler’s bipartisan bill to fight ocean acidification approved by committee, ready for full house vote

U.S. Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler’s bipartisan bill to help fight ocean acidification and support a healthy shellfish and fishing industry passed out of the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology Committee today.

As a new member of the Science Committee, Herrera Beutler prioritized advancing this bill she coauthored with Rep. Derek Kilmer, titled the Ocean Acidification Innovation Act. Their bipartisan legislation would allow federal agencies to use existing funds to conduct prize competitions to increase the ability to research, monitor, and manage ocean acidification and its impacts.

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Dungeness crabs in changing waters: research on ocean acidification (video)

Research suggests that Dungeness crabs are sensitive to the increasing acidity of our oceans. This research will help answer the question of how ocean acidification affects Dungeness crab and will inform strategies to sustain this robust fishery.

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People of IARC: Claudine Hauri

Researchers deploy moorings for physical, chemical, and biological data for the Chukchi Sea project. (Photo by Peter Shipton)

Researchers deploy moorings for physical, chemical, and biological data for the Chukchi Sea project. (Photo by Peter Shipton)

How did you get interested in ocean carbon?

Like many young people I loved dolphins and whales, and I really wanted to study marine biology. While pursuing a Master’s degree in Animal Sciences in Switzerland, I had the opportunity to conduct my research in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. There I learned how macroalgae affect the micro-environment of corals, including pH levels. This was my first introduction to inorganic carbon chemistry and ocean acidification.

When I began my PhD work back in Switzerland, I decided to focus on the impacts of ocean acidification on the chemical environment of the US West Coast. This involved developing a thorough understanding of the ocean inorganic carbon cycle and studying differences between the past, before human-made CO2, and today.

Continue reading ‘People of IARC: Claudine Hauri’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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