Archive for the 'Media coverage' Category

Rising acidity levels could put marine life at risk, expert says

Reversing the consequences of ocean acidification would be like steering the Titanic away from an iceberg.

Even if humanity stopped putting carbon dioxide (C02) into the atmosphere today, damage is still on the horizon.

That was the concluding message presented by Paul McElhany to about 30 members of The Fishin’ Club on Jan. 4 at the M-Bar-C Ranch in Freeland. McElhany, a research ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), discussed what ocean acidification could mean for marine life in Puget Sound.

Continue reading ‘Rising acidity levels could put marine life at risk, expert says’

Marine life can buffer ocean acidity, study finds

Tide pools reveal surprising influence of marine life on seawater chemistry. Photo Credit: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

Tide pools reveal surprising influence of marine life on seawater chemistry. Photo Credit: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

One of the many consequences of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide is ocean acidification—the lowering of seawater pH as CO2 chemically reacts with dissolved ions in seawater. Scientists have found that more acidic waters are dangerous to many species, especially structure-builders like corals, and thus the potential drop in pH predicted in the future would be devastating to marine habitats.So it’s not surprising that many scientists are actively looking for ways to mitigate this for coastal ecosystems, where losses could be especially impactful ecologically and economically. But the answer may be right in front of them: marine life is already able to buffer drops in pH, finds new research in Scientific Reports.

Continue reading ‘Marine life can buffer ocean acidity, study finds’

Climate change is altering lakes and streams, study suggests

To scientists who study lakes and rivers, it seems humans have embarked on a huge unplanned experiment.

By burning fossil fuels, we have already raised the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 40 percent, and we’re on track to increase it by much more. Some of that gas may mix into the world’s inland waters, and recent studies hint that this may have profound effects on the species that live in them.

Continue reading ‘Climate change is altering lakes and streams, study suggests’

Ocean acidity: trouble for shellfish (video)

http://www.wabi.tv/templates/2015_Sub_Video_Share?contentObj=468772663

In today’s Science with Dr. Bob experiment we are talking about ocean acidification and what that means for shellfish.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidity: trouble for shellfish (video)’

The bill “Coordinated Ocean Monitoring and Research Act” has passed Senate

Bill Passed: A bill to reauthorize the Integrated Coastal and Ocean Observation System Act of 2009, and for other purposes.

The bill passed the Senate Jan 08, 2018 . It was originally sponsored by (R) Senator Roger Wicker from MS.

Summary: Coordinated Ocean Monitoring and Research Act This bill revises and reauthorizes through FY2021 the Integrated Coastal and Ocean Observation System Act of 2009. The Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is a network of federal and regional entities that provide information about the nation’s coasts and oceans, as well as the Great Lakes. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) must: (1) serve as the lead federal agency for the implementation of the IOOS, and (2) establish an IOOS Program Office to oversee daily operations and coordination of the IOOS. The bill outlines the requirements for NOAA as the lead agency. The bill establishes a process for regional associations to certify their regional coastal observing systems. The Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology of the National Science and Technology Council must: (1) conduct an Ocean Chemistry Coastal Community Vulnerability Assessment on ocean acidification within a year and every five years thereafter; and (2) develop a plan to deploy ocean acidification sensors prioritized by the threat to coastal economies and ecosystems, gaps in data on ocean acidification, and research needs. The National Science Foundation’s research on ocean acidification must include research on: (1) impacts of multiple stressors on ecosystems exhibiting hypoxia (a dead zone that is depleted of oxygen), harmful algal blooms (rapid accumulation of algae), or sediment delivery; and (2) the effects of those impacts combined with changes in ocean chemistry.

Continue reading ‘The bill “Coordinated Ocean Monitoring and Research Act” has passed Senate’

Ocean acidification altering the architecture of California mussel shells

“What we’ve seen in more recent shells is that the crystals are small and disoriented,” said researcher Sophie McCoy.

Ocean acidification is altering the predictable patterns of mineralogy found in the shells of the California mussel. Photo by Sophie McCoy/FSU

 

California mussels aren’t built like they used to be. According to new research, increasing ocean acidification is altering the structural makeup of mussel shells along the West Coast.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification altering the architecture of California mussel shells’

New research on ocean acidity raises red flags for Alaskans

Fishing families and businesses across Alaska are veterans at keeping an eye out for change — day-to-day and season-to-season. The largest single employer in the state of Alaska, and a food source for millions, the successes of Alaskan seafood harvests rise and fall with a dynamic marine food web. New research is shedding light on a big change within that system — ocean acidification — and Alaska’s salmon fishermen are watching closely.

Continue reading ‘New research on ocean acidity raises red flags for Alaskans’


Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,051,966 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book