Archive for the 'Media coverage' Category

Coral microbiomes offer clues for resilience and conservation

Some coral species might be better equipped to adapt to a warmer, more acidic ocean. Finding out which ones, and why, could be the key to saving reefs around the world. 

The prognosis for coral reefs has continued to spiral downward over the past year. A report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in October found that coral reefs could decline by between 70% and 90% if the global average temperature increases by 1.5°C above preindustrial levels. At 2°C, the chances of any reefs surviving become slim to none.

Some scientists, not willing to throw up their hands and call it quits on saving coral, are seeking out a more strategic plan of action by trying to identify species that can tolerate warmer, more acidic water and figure out why they survive. Driving conservation efforts toward these more tolerant species might secure the crucial ecosystem functions that reefs provide, like housing fish and protecting coastlines.

Continue reading ‘Coral microbiomes offer clues for resilience and conservation’

Democrats looking to finally tackle climate impacts to Gulf of Maine

Scientists say the rise of ocean acidification in the Gulf of Maine will affect shell-building species, like these oysters being shoveled into a rinsing cage at Basket Island Oyster in Yarmouth.

Scientists say the rise of ocean acidification in the Gulf of Maine will affect shell-building species, like these oysters being shoveled into a rinsing cage at Basket Island Oyster in Yarmouth. Staff photo by Gregory Rec

After years of inaction, Maine may finally deal with the impacts of climate change along the coast, including ocean acidification, a byproduct of global warming that represents a potentially catastrophic threat to Maine’s marine harvesters.

More than four years ago, a bipartisan panel of experts convened by the Legislature issued a series of recommendations for Maine policymakers to respond to the acidification in the Gulf of Maine, which weakens clams and other shell-building animals and has been implicated in die-offs at mussel farms and oyster hatcheries. Despite dire warnings from scientists, clammers and hatchery owners, Republican legislative leaders and the administration of former Gov. Paul LePage declined to take substantive action.

Continue reading ‘Democrats looking to finally tackle climate impacts to Gulf of Maine’

Les impacts de l’acidification des océans aggravent ceux de son réchauffement (in French)

Entre la fin du 19e siècle et aujourd’hui, les océans se sont réchauffés de 0,83°C. Ils ont aussi absorbé un quart du dioxyde de carbone (CO2) provenant des activités humaines, atténuant ainsi le réchauffement climatique. Mais ce grand service de diminution de l’effet de serre atmosphérique a comme prix leur acidification progressive…

Jean-Pierre Gattuso, Directeur de recherche au laboratoire d’océanographie de Villefranche et à Sorbonne Université répond à ces questions :

Continue reading ‘Les impacts de l’acidification des océans aggravent ceux de son réchauffement (in French)’

Best of 2018: Ocean acidification, marine ecosystems and navigating the seas of change (audio)

People behind the science: Dr Marie McNeely interviews Dr Tessa Hill, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Continue reading ‘Best of 2018: Ocean acidification, marine ecosystems and navigating the seas of change (audio)’

Stanford takes students on virtual undersea journey (text and video)

On a recent day, a researcher was walking on the ocean floor, peering around at coral, urchins and picking up sea snails, turning them over in the palm of her glove to closely inspect them. The only catch: the explorer was actually in a dark, windowless room on the Stanford University campus pawing at the air.

The semi-departure from reality was a demonstration of a new virtual reality simulation under development by Stanford researchers aimed at teaching high school students about climate change. The team’s new virtual reality program teaches students about ocean acidification, the scientific concept where carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is increasing the acidity of the world’s oceans to the detriment of sea life.

“In school, environmental education is a difficult topic because it’s difficult to bring the kids to the ocean or even underwater,” said Stanford researcher Geraldine Fauville.

Continue reading ‘Stanford takes students on virtual undersea journey (text and video)’

Study: Ocean acidification will interfere with crucial sense of smell in juvenile salmon (audio)

It’s long been known that shellfish and other marine life are sensitive to ocean acidification caused by increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Some fish lose their sense of smell in acidic waters. There was a hope that salmon would not be affected. A new study shows otherwise.

A research team from the University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries spent two years observing the effects of elevated CO2 in saltwater on juvenile coho salmon.

Continue reading ‘Study: Ocean acidification will interfere with crucial sense of smell in juvenile salmon (audio)’

USP’S Emalus campus introduces ocean acidification monitoring in Vanuatu


Researchers from The University of the South Pacific’s (USP) Emalus Campus and University of Otago (UO) (New Zealand) organised a weeklong workshop from 19 – 23 November to introduce Ocean Acidification in Vanuatu.

The workshop was funded by The Ocean Foundation from the United States of America, as part of the installation of the Ocean Acidification Monitoring – GOA-ON in Box Kit for the monitoring of acidification levels (pH) in Vanuatu shores.

Continue reading ‘USP’S Emalus campus introduces ocean acidification monitoring in Vanuatu’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book