Posts Tagged 'Indian'

Short-term responses to ocean acidification: effects on relative abundance of eukaryotic plankton from the tropical Timor Sea

Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions drive climate change and pose one of the major challenges of our century. The effects of increased CO2 in the form of ocean acidification (OA) on the communities of marine planktonic eukaryotes in tropical regions such as the Timor Sea are barely understood. Here, we show the effects of high CO2 (pCO2=1823±161 μatm, pHT=7.46±0.05) versus in situ CO2 (pCO2=504±42 μatm, pHT=7.95±0.04) seawater on the community composition of marine planktonic eukaryotes immediately and after 48 hours of treatment exposure in a shipboard microcosm experiment. Illumina sequencing of the V9 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA (gene) was used to study the eukaryotic community composition. Down-regulation of extracellular carbonic anhydrase occurred faster in the high CO2 treatment. Increased CO2 significantly suppressed the relative abundances of eukaryotic operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including important primary producers. These effects were consistent between abundant (DNA-based) and active (cDNA-based) taxa after 48 hours, e.g., for the diatoms Trieres chinensis and Stephanopyxis turris. Effects were also very species-specific among the different diatoms. The microbial eukaryotes showed adaptation to the CO2 treatment over time, but many OTUs were adversely affected by decreasing pH. OA effects might fundamentally impact the base of marine biodiversity, suggesting unpredictable outcomes for food web functioning in the future ocean.

Continue reading ‘Short-term responses to ocean acidification: effects on relative abundance of eukaryotic plankton from the tropical Timor Sea’

Variation of pCO2 concentrations induced by tropical cyclones “Wind-Pump” in the middle-latitude surface oceans: a comparative study

The Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) and Bay of Bengal Ocean Acidification (BOBOA) mooring measurements were used to identify changes in the partial pressure of CO2 at the sea surface (pCO2sea) and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) associated with passage of two tropical cyclones (TCs), Florence and Hudhud. TC Florence passed about 165 km off the BTM mooring site with strong wind speeds of 24.8 m s–1 and translation speed of 7.23 m s–1. TC Hudhud passed about 178 km off the BOBOA mooring site with wind speeds of 14.0 m s–1 and translation speed of 2.58 m s–1. The present study examined the effect of temperature, salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), air-sea CO2 flux, and phytoplankton chlorophyll a change on pCO2sea as a response to TCs. Enhanced mixed layer depths were observed due to TCs-induced vertical mixing at both mooring sites. Decreased pCO2sea (–15.16±5.60 μatm) at the BTM mooring site and enhanced pCO2sea (14.81±7.03 μatm) at the BOBOA mooring site were observed after the passage of Florence and Hudhud, respectively. Both DIC and TA are strongly correlated with salinity in the upper layer of the isothermal layer depth (ILD). Strong (weak) vertical gradient in salinity is accompanied by strong (weak) vertical gradients in DIC and TA. Strong vertical salinity gradient in the upper layer of the ILD (0.031 psu m–1), that supply much salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity from the thermocline was the cause of the increased pCO2sea in the BOBOA mooring water. Weak vertical salinity gradient in the upper layer of the ILD (0.003 psu m–1) was responsible for decreasing pCO2sea in the BTM mooring water. The results of this study showed that the vertical salinity gradient in the upper layer of the ILD is a good indicator of the pCO2sea variation after the passages of TCs.

Continue reading ‘Variation of pCO2 concentrations induced by tropical cyclones “Wind-Pump” in the middle-latitude surface oceans: a comparative study’

State and trends of Australia’s oceans: ocean acidification

The pH and aragonite saturation state of surface seawaters around Australia
are influenced by the large-scale circulation, and superimposed on this are the
effects of seasonal changes due largely to biological activity and temperature
change. Maximum values of aragonite saturation state tend to develop over
summer-early autumn, while pH values are typically greatest in winter.
Biological production contributes to increases of both pH and aragonite
saturation state in the spring-summer, while warming acts to increase the
saturation state and decrease pH. Seasonal ranges of both variables are
already estimated to be outside the ranges that many of Australia’s marine
ecosystems are likely to have experienced in the late 1800s.

Continue reading ‘State and trends of Australia’s oceans: ocean acidification’

State and trends of Australia’s ocean report: ocean acidification and calcifying zooplankton

There is no evidence of a decline in calcifying zooplankton at the IMOS National
Reference Stations over the past 10 years, suggesting ocean acidification
over this time span is unlikely to be having a substantial impact on calcifying
zooplankton. However, there is some evidence that calcifying zooplankton
might at Maria Island and Yongala be sensitive to the aragonite saturation state
at the range of values currently observed.

Continue reading ‘State and trends of Australia’s ocean report: ocean acidification and calcifying zooplankton’

Evaluation of heterotrophic bacteria associated with healthy and bleached corals of Gulf of Kutch, Gujarat, India for siderophore production and their response to climate change factors

Highlights

• Comparison of siderophore production by healthy and bleached coral associated microbes.

• Catecholate type of siderophore is mainly produced by coral associated microbes.

• Adapting ability of healthy and bleached coral isolates in changing climate.

• Significant effect of lowering pH and increasing temperature on growths and siderophore production of coral associated bacteria.

Abstract

Bacteria are known to play a crucial role in coral health but their mechanisms are unclear. Siderophore production could be one of the mechanisms by which they benefit or harm the corals. Bacteria produce siderophore to adapt in harsh conditions, such as nutrient limiting and competing environments such as coral surface. In the present study, siderophore producing ability of microbes associated with healthy and bleached corals is evaluated as both healthy and bleached coral surface provide a different environment concerning nutrients and competitions. Total of 129 siderophore-producing bacteria associated with two healthy (n = 66 isolates) and bleached coral (n = 63) species (Porites spp. and Turbinaria spp.) from the Gulf of Kutch (GoK), Gujarat (India) are screened and compared. No relation between coral health status and siderophore producing ability of microbes is observed (one-way ANOVA, p = 0.67). All the isolates are positive to catecholate type of siderophore which has the strongest affinity for limiting iron. The study also explores the growth and siderophore production behavior of healthy and bleached coral isolates at decreasing pH and temperature rise as they are the important factors that affects the solubility of nutrients and thus, the structure and functioning of the microbes. Isolates from bleached corals showed an increase in growth even at pH 6, whereas the growth of healthy coral isolates reduces at pH 6. Temperature rise is negatively correlated to growth and siderophore production by all isolates except Bacillus sp. PH26. Combined low pH and temperature rise stress, negatively affect growth and siderophore production of coral-associated microbes with Bacillus sp. PH26 as exception. General correlation trend of bacterial growth and siderophore production is positive. The isolates showing exceptional behavior might be possibly beneficial or harmful to the coral health. Thus, growth and siderophore production of microbes under changing climate conditions might be used as preliminary tools to screen beneficial and pathogenic microbes of corals from opportunistic microbes. This screening would reduce the number of possible candidates for in-situ and in-vitro microcosm experiments to understand the role of siderophore producing microbes in coral health. Overall, pH and temperature have a significant impact on coral-associated microbial growth and siderophore production, which ultimately impact the coral health and disease as the microbes form an integral part of coral holobiont. The study laid the foundation for future studies to understand the role of siderophore producing bacteria in coral health in the global climate-changing era.

Continue reading ‘Evaluation of heterotrophic bacteria associated with healthy and bleached corals of Gulf of Kutch, Gujarat, India for siderophore production and their response to climate change factors’

Ocean acidification impacts on hatching success and reproductive tissue damage in anemonefish

Oceans have continuously absorbed anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The early life stages are likely vulnerable to low pH conditions. The present study aimed to assess the anemonefish (Amphiprionsebae), egg hatch rate and gonadal tissue condition in different pH levels in 6 weeks. Seawater
pH was manually manipulated by bubbling known concentrations of CO2 to achieve three pH treatments 8.1, 7.7 and 7.3. Egg hatch rate decreased with declining pH (ambient pH – 93 %, pH 7.7 – 92 %, pH 7.3 – 88 %) and a slight time delay was observed between the ambient and lower pH treatments. The condition of testicular and ovarian tissue was not affected by low pH levels. Overall, present experiment found that the slight negative effects on egg hatching success in low pH condition. The experimental results suggested that early life stages expected to vulnerable to near future ocean acidification.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification impacts on hatching success and reproductive tissue damage in anemonefish’

The combined effect of zinc and pH on growth rate and chlorophyll content of brown seaweed, Padina boryana

Brown seaweed, Padina boryana is found along the coast of Terengganu, Malaysia and may serve as a potential heavy metal biomonitor in the coastal zones. To better understand the impact of heavy metal pollution on P. boryana at varying seawater pH levels, the combined effect of zinc (Zn) and pH on its growth rate and chlorophyll content was investigated in laboratory exposures. After exposure for 21 days in a mixed treatment of 6 pH variations (4 to 9) and three Zn concentrations (30, 150, 300 ppb), maximum growth rate was observed in controlled treatments at pH 8 with no added Zn, whereas treatments at pH 4 and 9 showed negative growth rates after 18 days. The growth rate and chlorophyll content of P. boryana decreased significantly with an increase in Zn concentration. At pH 6, 7 and 8, P. boryana showed significant decreases (p < 0.05) in growth rates and chlorophyll content in all concentrations of Zn compared with control plants (no Zn). At pH of 6.0 and below, controls were also affected with significantly reduced growth rates and chlorophyll contents while Zn treated seaweed showed significant effects compared to these controls. The effect of pH and Zn on all measured factors was obvious on Day 6 onwards, whereas the interaction effect between them was significant on chlorophyll content throughout the experiment. From Day 9 onwards, the growth rate and chlorophyll content showed significant correlation among each other.

Continue reading ‘The combined effect of zinc and pH on growth rate and chlorophyll content of brown seaweed, Padina boryana’

Impacts of Zn and Cu enrichment under ocean acidification scenario on a phytoplankton community from tropical upwelling system

Highlights

• Phytoplankton showed higher resilience to increasing CO2.

• Few centric diatoms showed positive response to increasing CO2 supply.

• Addition of Zn under increasing CO2 inhibited cell division, but not biomass.

• The combined effects of increasing CO2 and Cu addition was insignificant on growth.

• Cu addition at high CO2 level promoted toxigenic pennate diatom growth.

Abstract

Increasing dissolution of CO2 in the surface ocean is rapidly decreasing its pH and changing carbon chemistry which is further affecting marine biota in several ways. Phytoplankton response studies under the combination of elevated CO2 and trace metals are rare. We have conducted two consecutive onboard incubation experiments (R. V. Sindhu Sadhana; August 2017) in the eastern Arabian Sea (SW coast of India) during an upwelling event. A nutrient enriched diatom bloom was initiated onboard and grown under ambient (≈400 μatm, A-CO2) and high CO2 levels (≈1000 μatm; H–CO2) with different zinc (Zn; 1 nM) and copper (Cu) concentrations (1 nM, 2 nM and 8 nM). Phytoplankton community composition and the dominant genera were different during these two experiments. CO2 enrichment alone did not show any significant growth stimulating impact on the experimental community except enhanced cell density in the first experiment. Addition of Zn at A-CO2 level revealed no noticeable responses; whereas, the same treatment under H–CO2 level significantly reduced cell number. Considerably high protein content under H–CO2+Zn treatment was possibly counteracting Zn toxicity which also caused slower growth rate. Cu addition did not show any noticeable impact on growth and biomass production except increased protein content as well as decreased carbohydrate: protein ratio. This can be attributed to relatively higher protein synthesis than carbohydrate to alleviate oxidative stress generated by Cu. The centric diatom Chaetoceros and toxin producing pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschias howed no significant response to either CO2 or Zn enrichment. Large centric diatom Leptocylindrus and Skeletonema responded positively to Zn addition in both CO2 levels. The former species showed the most sensitive response at the highest Cu and H–CO2 treatment; whereas, the pennate diatoms Nitzschia and Pseudo-nitzschia (toxigenic diatom) showed higher resilience under elevated CO2 and Cu levels. This observation indicated that in future ocean, increasing CO2 concentrations and trace metal pollution may potentially alter phytoplankton community structure and may facilitate toxigenic diatom bloom in the coastal waters.

Continue reading ‘Impacts of Zn and Cu enrichment under ocean acidification scenario on a phytoplankton community from tropical upwelling system’

A coralline alga gains tolerance to ocean acidification over multiple generations of exposure

Crustose coralline algae play a crucial role in the building of reefs in the photic zones of nearshore ecosystems globally, and are highly susceptible to ocean acidification. Nevertheless, the extent to which ecologically important crustose coralline algae can gain tolerance to ocean acidification over multiple generations of exposure is unknown. We show that, while calcification of juvenile crustose coralline algae is initially highly sensitive to ocean acidification, after six generations of exposure the effects of ocean acidification disappear. A reciprocal transplant experiment conducted on the seventh generation, where half of all replicates were interchanged across treatments, confirmed that they had acquired tolerance to low pH and not simply to laboratory conditions. Neither exposure to greater pH variability, nor chemical conditions within the micro-scale calcifying fluid internally, appeared to play a role in fostering this capacity. Our results demonstrate that reef-accreting taxa can gain tolerance to ocean acidification over multiple generations of exposure, suggesting that some of these cosmopolitan species could maintain their critical ecological role in reef formation.

Continue reading ‘A coralline alga gains tolerance to ocean acidification over multiple generations of exposure’

The carbonate system on the coral patches and rocky intertidal habitats of the northern Persian Gulf: implications for ocean acidification studies

This research characterizes the temporal and spatial variability of the seawater carbonate chemistry on the near-shore waters of the northern Persian Gulf and Makran Sea. In general, normalized total alkalinity (nAT) showed a westward decrease along the coasts of Makran Sea and the Persian Gulf. Intertidal seawater was always supersaturated in terms of calcium carbonate minerals during the daytime. Rocky shore waters in the Persian Gulf were sinks for CO2 in the winter during the daytime. The nAT decreased from Larak to Khargu Island by 81 μmol/kg. As expected, the two hypothetical drivers of bio-calcification, i.e., Ω and the [HCO3 −]/[H+] ratio, were significantly related at a narrow range of ambient temperature. However, as data were pooled over seasons and study sites, in contrast to ΩAr, the [HCO3 −]/[H+] ratio showed a slight dependence on temperature, suggesting that the ratio should be investigated as a more reliable factor in future biocalcification researches.

Continue reading ‘The carbonate system on the coral patches and rocky intertidal habitats of the northern Persian Gulf: implications for ocean acidification studies’


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Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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