Posts Tagged 'field'

Rapid reduction of pH and CaCO3 saturation state in the Tsugaru Strait by the intensified Tsugaru warm current during 2012‐2019

Abstract

To examine the ocean acidification of coastal water as the result of the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic atmospheric CO2, we initiated acidification monitoring in the eastern part of the Tsugaru Strait, through which the Tsugaru Warm Current flows eastward from the Sea of Japan to the North Pacific. Annual mean pH and CaCO3 saturation state during 2012–2019 decreased considerably throughout all depths at rates of 0.0030−0.0051 yr−1 and 0.017−0.036 yr−1, respectively. These rates of decrease are faster than those caused by increasing atmospheric CO2, and faster than those observed during previous research. These fast rates are attributed to an enhanced increase in dissolved inorganic carbon concurrently with increases in salinity and density caused by elevated mixing of the upper and deeper waters from the Sea of Japan at the western part of the strait. The elevated mixing is attributable to the strengthening of the Tsugaru Warm Current.

Plain Language Summary

Approximately 30% of the total amount of CO2 released to the atmosphere by human activities has accumulated in the global ocean. This oceanic uptake of CO2 has resulted in ocean acidification. In coastal waters the acidification affects marine organisms, thus coastal ecosystems may be more vulnerable to acidification than the open ocean. To examine the extent to which acidification has advanced in the eastern part of the Tsugaru Strait, through which the Tsugaru Warm Current passes from the Sea of Japan to the North Pacific, we initiated a time‐series observation of acidification. The pH reduction is found to have enhanced considerably across the whole depth during 2012‐2019 at a rate faster than that caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 and at the highest rates observed during previous research. The rapid pH reduction is found to be attributable to the enhanced rate of increase of dissolved inorganic carbon concurrently with increases in salinity and density caused by elevated mixing of the upper and deeper waters from the Sea of Japan at the western strait due to the strengthening of the Tsugaru Warm Current. In other straits that are connected to the open ocean, the strengthening of their throughflow may also accelerate acidification.

Continue reading ‘Rapid reduction of pH and CaCO3 saturation state in the Tsugaru Strait by the intensified Tsugaru warm current during 2012‐2019’

High-resolution carbonate system dynamics of Netarts Bay, OR from 2014 to 2019

Netarts Bay is a shallow, temperate, tidal lagoon located on the northern coast of Oregon and the site of the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery (WCSH). Data collected with an autonomous continuous flow-through system installed at WCSH capable of high-resolution (1 Hz) partial pressure of aqueous CO2 (pCO2) and hourly total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) measurements, with combined measurement uncertainties of < 2.0% and 0.5%, respectively, is analyzed over the 2014–2019 interval. Summer upwelling, wintertime downwelling, and in situ bay biogeochemistry represent significant modes of the observed variability in carbonate system dynamics. Summer upwelling is associated with large amplitude diel pCO2 variability, elevated TCO2 and alkalinity, but weak variability in salinity. Wintertime downwelling is associated with bay freshening by both local and remote sources, a strong tidal signature in salinity, TCO2, and alkalinity, with diel pCO2 variability much less amplified when compared to summer. Further, analysis of alkalinity-salinity relationships suggests multiple water masses inhabiting the bay during 1 year: mixing of end-members associated with direct precipitation, coastal rivers, southward displacement of the Columbia River plume, California Current surface and deep upwelled waters. The importance of in-bay processes such as net community metabolism during intervals of high productivity are apparent. These direct measurements of pCO2 and TCO2 have been useful to local hatchery owners who have monitored intake waters following historic seed-production failures related to high-CO2 conditions exacerbated by ocean acidification.

Continue reading ‘High-resolution carbonate system dynamics of Netarts Bay, OR from 2014 to 2019’

Coastal pH variability and the eco-physiological and behavioural response of a coastal fish species in light of future ocean acidification

Ocean acidification (OA) is a global phenomenon referring to a decrease in ocean pH and a perturbation of the seawater carbonate system due to ever-increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In coastal environments, identifying the impacts of OA is complex due to the multiple contributors to pH variability by coastal processes, such as freshwater inflow, upwelling, hydrodynamic processes, and biological activity. The aim of this PhD study was to quantify the local processes occurring in a temperate coastal embayment, Algoa Bay in South Africa, that contribute to pH and carbonate chemistry variability over time (monthly and 24-hour) and space (~10 km) and examine how this variability impacts a local fish species, Diplodus capensis, also commonly known as ‘blacktail’. Algoa Bay, known for its complex oceanography, is an interesting location in which to quantify carbonate chemistry variability. To assess this variability, monitoring sites were selected to coincide with the Algoa Bay Sentinel Site long-term ecological research (LTER) and continuous monitoring (CMP) programmes. The average pH at offshore sites in the bay was 8.03 ± 0.07 and at inshore sites was 8.04 ± 0.15. High pH variability (~0.55–0.61 pH units) was recorded at both offshore (>10 m depth) and inshore sites (intertidal surf zones). Many sites in the bay, especially the atypical site at Cape Recife, exhibit higher than the average pH levels (>8.04), suggesting that pH variability may be biologically driven. This is further evidenced by high diurnal variability in pH (~0.55 pH units). Although the specific drivers of the high pH variability in Algoa Bay could not be identified, baseline carbonate chemistry conditions were identified, which is necessary information to design and interpret biological experiments. Long-term, continuous monitoring is required to improve understanding of the drivers of pH variability in understudied coastal regions, like Algoa Bay.

Continue reading ‘Coastal pH variability and the eco-physiological and behavioural response of a coastal fish species in light of future ocean acidification’

Geographical variation in phenotypic plasticity of intertidal sister limpet’s species under ocean acidification scenarios

Ocean Acidification (OA) can have pervasive effects in calcifying marine organisms, and a better understanding of how different populations respond at the physiological and evolutionary level could help to model the impacts of global change in marine ecosystems. Due to its natural geography and oceanographic processes, the Chilean coast provides a natural laboratory where benthic organisms are frequently exposed to diverse projected OA scenarios. The goal of this study was to assess whether a population of mollusks thriving in a more variable environment (Talcaruca) would present higher phenotypic plasticity in physiological and morphological traits in response to different pCO2 when compared to a population of the same species from a more stable environment (Los Molles). To achieve this, two benthic limpets (Scurria zebrina and Scurria viridula) inhabiting these two contrasting localities were exposed to ocean acidification experimental conditions representing the current pCO2 in the Chilean coast (500 μatm) and the levels predicted for the year 2100 in upwelling zones (1500 (μatm). Our results show that the responses to OA are species-specific, even in this related species. Interestingly, S. viridula showed better performance under OA than S. zebrina (i.e., similar sizes and carbonate content in individuals from both populations; lower effects of acidification on the growth rate combined with a reduction of metabolism at higher pCO2). Remarkably, these characteristics could explain this species’ success in overstepping the biogeographical break in the area of Talcaruca, which S. zebrina cannot achieve. Besides, the results show that the habitat factor has a strong influence on some traits. For instance, individuals from Talcaruca presented a higher growth rate plasticity index and lower shell dissolution rates in acidified conditions than those from Los Molles. These results show that limpets from the variable environment tend to display higher plasticity, buffering the physiological effects of OA compared with limpets from the more stable environment. Taken together, these findings highlight the key role of geographic variation in phenotypic plasticity to determine the vulnerability of calcifying organisms to future scenarios of OA.

Continue reading ‘Geographical variation in phenotypic plasticity of intertidal sister limpet’s species under ocean acidification scenarios’

The Bouraké semi-enclosed lagoon (New Caledonia). A natural laboratory to study the life-long adaptation of a coral reef ecosystem to climate change-like conditions

According to current experimental evidence, coral reefs could disappear within the century if CO2 emissions remain unabated. However, recent discoveries of diverse and high cover reefs that already thrive under extreme conditions seem to contradict these projections. Volcanic CO2 vents, semi-enclosed lagoons and mangrove estuaries are unique study sites where one or more ecologically relevant parameters for life in the oceans are close or even worse than currently projected for the year 2100. These natural analogues of future conditions hold new hope for the future of coral reefs and provide unique natural laboratories to explore how reef species could keep pace with climate change. To achieve this, it is essential to characterize their environment as a whole, and accurately consider all possible environmental factors that may differ from what is expected in the future and that may possibly alter the ecosystem response.

In this study, we focus on the semi-enclosed lagoon of Bouraké (New Caledonia, SW Pacific Ocean) where a healthy reef ecosystem thrives in warm, acidified and deoxygenated water. We used a multi-scale approach to characterize the main physical-chemical parameters and mapped the benthic community composition (i.e., corals, sponges, and macroalgae). The data revealed that most physical and chemical parameters are regulated by the tide, strongly fluctuate 3 to 4 times a day, and are entirely predictable. The seawater pH and dissolved oxygen decrease during falling tide and reach extreme low values at low tide (7.2 pHT and 1.9 mg O2 L−1 at Bouraké, vs 7.9 pHT and 5.5 mg O2 L−1 at reference reefs). Dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH fluctuates according to the tide of up to 4.91 mg O2 L−1, 6.50 °C, and 0.69 pHT units on a single day. Furthermore, the concentration of most of the chemical parameters was one- to 5-times higher at the Bouraké lagoon, particularly for organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen, but also for some nutrients, notably silicates. Surprisingly, despite extreme environmental conditions and altered seawater chemical composition, our results reveal a diverse and high cover community of macroalgae, sponges and corals accounting for 28, 11 and 66 species, respectively. Both environmental variability and nutrient imbalance might contribute to their survival under such extreme environmental conditions. We describe the natural dynamics of the Bouraké ecosystem and its relevance as a natural laboratory to investigate the benthic organism’s adaptive responses to multiple stressors like future climate change conditions.

Continue reading ‘The Bouraké semi-enclosed lagoon (New Caledonia). A natural laboratory to study the life-long adaptation of a coral reef ecosystem to climate change-like conditions’

Multiple ecological parameters affect living benthic foraminifera in the river-influenced west-central Bay of Bengal

The huge riverine influx and associated processes decrease the ambient salinity, stratify the water column, modulate the oxygen-deficient zone, and are also responsible for the recent acidification in the Bay of Bengal. Here, we have studied the effect of these riverine influx-dominated ecological parameters on living benthic foraminifera in the west-central Bay of Bengal. We report that the pH below 7.6 in front of the Krishna river, reduces the diversity and the richness of living benthic foraminifera on the adjacent shelf and the slope. A similar decreased diversity and richness is also observed in front of the Godavari River. We delineate three prominent assemblages, representing different depth zones with associated distinct physico-chemical conditions. The shallow water assemblage (∼27–100 m) is represented by Nonionella labradoricaHanzawaia nipponicaBrizalina dilatataAmmonia tepida, and Nonionella limbato-striata. These species are adapted to relatively warmer temperatures and more oxygenated waters. The deepwater assemblage (∼1,940–2,494 m) includes Bulimina cf. delreyensis, Bulimina marginataHormosinella guttiferaCassidulina laevigata, and Gyroidinoides subzelandica and can tolerate a relatively colder temperature. The intermediate-depth assemblage (∼145–1,500 m) dominated by Eubuliminella exilis, Bolivinellina earlandiFursenkoina spinosaBolivinellina lucidopunctataGlobobulimina globosa, Fursenkoina spinosa, Eubuliminella cassandrae, Uvigerina peregrina, Rotaliatinopsis semiinvoluta, and Cassidulina laevigata, represents oxygen-deficient and organic carbon-rich environment. Besides the pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and organic matter, we also report a strong influence of bathymetry, coarse fraction (CF) and the type of organic matter on a few living benthic foraminifera. The ecological preferences of 40 such dominant living benthic foraminifera, each representing a specific environment, have also been reported for site-specific proxy. We conclude that although the huge riverine influx affects living benthic foraminifera on the shelf, the dissolved oxygen and organic carbon mostly control benthic foraminiferal distribution in the deeper west-central Bay of Bengal.

Continue reading ‘Multiple ecological parameters affect living benthic foraminifera in the river-influenced west-central Bay of Bengal’

Epiphytic hydroids on Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadows are winner organisms under future ocean acidification conditions: evidence from a CO2 vent system (Ischia Island, Italy)

Effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the plant phenology and colonization/settlement pattern of the hydrozoan epibiont community of the leaves of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica have been studied at volcanic CO2 vents off Ischia (Italy). The study was conducted in shallow Posidonia stands (2.5–3.5 m depth), in three stations on the north and three on the south sides of the vent’s area (Castello Aragonese vents), distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 10–15 P. oceanica shoots were collected every three months for one-year cycle (Sept 2009–2010). The shoot density of Posidonia beds in the most acidified stations along the gradient (pH < 7.4) was significantly higher than that in the control area (pH = 8.10). On the other hand, we recorded lower leaf lengths and widths in the acidified stations in the whole year of observations, compared to those in the control stations. However, the overall leaf surface (Leaf Area Index) available for epiphytes under ocean acidification conditions was higher on the south side and on both the most acidified stations because of the higher shoot density under OA conditions. The hydrozoan epibiont community on the leaf canopy accounted for seven species, three of which were relatively abundant and occurring all year around (Sertularia perpusilla, Plumularia obliqua, Clytia hemisphaerica). All hydroids species showed a clear tolerance to low pH levels, including chitinous and non-calcifying forms, likely favoured also by the absence of competition for substratum with the calcareous forms of epiphytes selected against OA.

Continue reading ‘Epiphytic hydroids on Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadows are winner organisms under future ocean acidification conditions: evidence from a CO2 vent system (Ischia Island, Italy)’

Alkalinity cycling and carbonate chemistry decoupling in seagrass mystify processes of acidification mitigation

The adverse conditions of acidification on sensitive marine organisms has led to the investigation of bioremediation methods as a way to abate local acidification. This phytoremediation, by macrophytes, is expected to reduce the severity of acidification in nearshore habitats on short timescales. Characterizing the efficacy of phytoremediation can be challenging as residence time, tidal mixing, freshwater input, and a limited capacity to fully constrain the carbonate system can lead to erroneous conclusions. Here, we present in situ observations of carbonate chemistry relationships to seagrass habitats by comparing dense (DG), patchy (PG), and no grass (NG) Zostera marina pools in the high intertidal experiencing intermittent flooding. High-frequency measurements of pH, alkalinity (TA), and total-CO2 elucidate extreme diel cyclicity in all parameters. The DG pool displayed frequent decoupling between pH and aragonite saturation state (Ω arg ) suggesting pH-based inferences of acidification remediation by seagrass can be misinterpreted as pH and Ω arg can be independent stressors for some bivalves. Estimates show the DG pool had an integrated ΔTA of 550 μmol kg -1 over a 12 h period, which is ~60 % > the PG and NG pools. We conclude habitats with mixed photosynthesizes (i.e., PG pool) result in less decoupling between pH and Ωarg.

Continue reading ‘Alkalinity cycling and carbonate chemistry decoupling in seagrass mystify processes of acidification mitigation’

Impacts of multiple stressors on a benthic foraminiferal community: a long-term experiment assessing response to ocean acidification, hypoxia and warming

Ocean chemistry is changing as a result of human activities. Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing, causing an increase in oceanic pCO2 that drives a decrease in oceanic pH, a process called ocean acidification (OA). Higher CO2 concentrations are also linked to rising global temperatures that can result in more stratified surface waters, reducing the exchange between surface and deep waters; this stronger stratification, along with nutrient pollution, contributes to an expansion of oxygen-depleted zones (so called hypoxia or deoxygenation). Determining the response of marine organisms to environmental changes is important for assessments of future ecosystem functioning. While many studies have assessed the impact of individual or paired stressors, fewer studies have assessed the combined impact of pCO2, O2, and temperature. A long-term experiment (∼10 months) with different treatments of these three stressors was conducted to determine their sole or combined impact on the abundance and survival of a benthic foraminiferal community collected from a continental-shelf site. Foraminifera are well suited to such study because of their small size, relatively rapid growth, varied mineralogies and physiologies. Inoculation materials were collected from a ∼77-m deep site south of Woods Hole, MA. Very fine sediments (<53 μm) were used as inoculum, to allow the entire community to respond. Thirty-eight morphologically identified taxa grew during the experiment. Multivariate statistical analysis indicates that hypoxia was the major driving factor distinguishing the yields, while warming was secondary. Species responses were not consistent, with different species being most abundant in different treatments. Some taxa grew in all of the triple-stressor samples. Results from the experiment suggest that foraminiferal species’ responses will vary considerably, with some being negatively impacted by predicted environmental changes, while other taxa will tolerate, and perhaps even benefit, from deoxygenation, warming and OA.

Continue reading ‘Impacts of multiple stressors on a benthic foraminiferal community: a long-term experiment assessing response to ocean acidification, hypoxia and warming’

Spatial variability of summertime aragonite saturation states and its influencing factor in the Bering Sea

The Bering sea is susceptible to ocean acidification driven by both human activities (anthropogenic CO2) and distinctive natural processes. To assess the situation of ocean acidification, we investigated the spatial variability of aragonite saturation states (ΩAr) in July 2010 during the 4th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). The surface waters were all oversaturated with respect to aragonite (ΩAr > 1) due to high biological removal, and ΩAr ranged from 1.43 to 3.17. The relatively low ΩAr values were found in the western Bering Strait and eastern nearshore region of the Bering Sea Shelf, which were associated with the upwelling and riverine input, respectively. In the subsurface, the ΩAr decreased to generally low saturation states and were observed to be strongly undersaturated (ΩAr < 1) in the bottom waters with a lowest value of 0.45, which might be caused by remineralization. However, unlike prior studies, the low ΩAr values in the shallow nearshore region were still above the saturation horizon throughout the water column, which were probably counteracted by high local primary production. In the context of climate change and increasing anthropogenic CO2 absorption, the suppression and undersaturation of ΩAr in the Bering Sea are not only attributed to the natural processes but also the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2.

Continue reading ‘Spatial variability of summertime aragonite saturation states and its influencing factor in the Bering Sea’

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