Posts Tagged 'zooplankton'

Predicting potential impacts of ocean acidification on marine calcifiers from the Southern Ocean

Understanding the vulnerability of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is a critical issue, especially in the Southern Ocean (SO), which is likely to be the one of the first, and most severely affected regions. Since the industrial revolution, ~30% of anthropogenic CO2 has been absorbed by the oceans. Seawater pH levels have already decreased by 0.1 and are predicted to decline by ~ 0.3 by the year 2100. This process, known as ocean acidification (OA), is shallowing the saturation horizon, which is the depth below which calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dissolves, likely increasing the vulnerability of many marine calcifiers to dissolution. The negative impact of OA may be seen first in species depositing more soluble CaCO3 mineral phases such as aragonite and high-Mg calcite (HMC). These negative effects may become even exacerbated by increasing sea temperatures. Here we combine a review and a quantitative meta-analysis to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about skeletal mineralogy of major taxonomic groups of SO marine calcifiers and to make predictions about how OA might affect different taxa. We consider their geographic range, skeletal mineralogy, biological traits and potential strategies to overcome OA. The meta-analysis of studies investigating the effects of the OA on a range of biological responses such as shell state, development and growth rate shows response variation depending on mineralogical composition. Species-specific responses due to mineralogical composition suggest taxa with calcitic, aragonitic and HMC skeletons may be more vulnerable to the expected carbonate chemistry alterations, and low magnesium calcite (LMC) species may be mostly resilient. Environmental and biological control on the calcification process and/or Mg content in calcite, biological traits and physiological processes are also expected to influence species specific responses.

Continue reading ‘Predicting potential impacts of ocean acidification on marine calcifiers from the Southern Ocean’

Current and future trophic interactions in tropical shallow-reef lagoon habitats

Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) sediments are the dominant form of CaCO3 on coral reefs accumulating in lagoon and inter-reefal areas. Owing to their mineralogy and a range of physical parameters, tropical CaCO3 sediments are predicted to be more sensitive to dissolution driven by ocean acidification than the skeleton of living reef organisms. How this scales up to impact infaunal organisms, which are an important food source for higher trophic levels, and thereby ecosystem functioning, is not well explored. We combined seasonal field surveys in a shallow-reef lagoon ecosystem on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with stable isotope analyses and a tank-based experiment to examine the potential top-down influence of the deposit-feeding sea cucumber, Stichopus herrmanni, on this infaunal community under current and future ocean pH. Densities of surface-sediment meiofauna were lowest in winter and spring, with harpacticoid copepods (38%) and nematodes (27%) the dominant taxa. Stable isotope analyses showed that S. herrmanni had a top-down influence on meiofauna and microphytes with a distinct δ13C and δ15N trophic position that was homogenous across seasons and locations. Tanks that mimicked sandy shallow-reef lagoon habitats were used to examine the effects of ocean acidification (elevated pCO2) on this trophic interaction. We used outdoor control (sediment only) and experimental (sediment plus S. herrmanni) tanks maintained at present-day and near-future pCO2 (+ 570 µatm) for 24 days, which fluctuated with the diel pCO2 cycle. In sediment-only tanks, copepods were > twofold more abundant at elevated pCO2, with no negative effects documented for any meiofauna group. When included in the community, top-down control by S. herrmanni counteracted the positive effects of low pH on meiofaunal abundance. We highlight a novel perspective in coral reef trophodynamics between surface-sediment meiofauna and deposit-feeding sea cucumbers, and posit that community shifts may occur in shallow-reef lagoon habitats in a future ocean with implications for the functioning of coral reefs from the bottom up.

Continue reading ‘Current and future trophic interactions in tropical shallow-reef lagoon habitats’

Diel vertical migration into anoxic and high-pCO2 waters: acoustic and net-based krill observations in the Humboldt Current

A select group of marine organisms can enter the Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) and even anoxic waters, while performing diel vertical migration (DVM). DVM of the euphausiid Euphausia eximia off northern Chile in the spring of 2015 was documented based on acoustic measurements using an echo sounder along with net samplings. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were obtained using a vertical profiler, and water samples were collected to obtain in situ nitrite (NO2) concentrations as well as pHT, total alkalinity (AT), and therefore carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) was estimated. Krill were found to migrate up to the surface (0–50 m) during the night and returned to ca. 200–300 m depth during the day, spending between 11 and 14 h at these layers. At the surface, DO and NO2 concentrations were 208 and 0.14 μM respectively, while pHT was 8.04 and 405 μatm pCO2. In contrast, at the deeper layers (200–300 m), DO and NO2 were < 3 and 6.3 μM respectively, with pHT 7.53 and 1490 μatm pCO2. The pHT and high pCO2 values at depths represent the conditions predicted for open ocean waters in a worst-case global warming scenario by 2150. The acoustic scatter suggested that > 60% of the krill swarms enter the OMZ and anoxic waters during the daytime. These frequent migrations suggest that krill can tolerate such extreme conditions associated with anoxic and high-pCO2 waters. The inferences drawn from the observation of these migrations might have strong implications for the current oceanic carbon pump models, highlighting the need for understanding the molecular and physiological adaptations allowing these migrations.

Continue reading ‘Diel vertical migration into anoxic and high-pCO2 waters: acoustic and net-based krill observations in the Humboldt Current’

Ocean acidification impacts on zooplankton

Rising atmospheric CO2 alters the ocean biochemistry in the process known as ocean acidification (OA). It influences biodiversity at different levels, including zooplankton, which is a key component of aquatic communities and plays a pivotal role in the structure and functioning of marine planktonic food webs as a major link between pelagic primary producers and planktivorous. The effect of OA on the fitness of individual zooplanktonic species has been reported by many studies mostly developed under laboratory conditions. In this context, this chapter reviews the OA effects on zooplankton and describes the potential of natural shallow-water CO2 vents as in situ laboratories. The impact on zooplankton assemblages is shown from a study in the North Atlantic (Azores islands) and the suitability of this area for future studies on marine organisms and ecosystems. Sites with naturally elevated CO2 conditions are described, including which variables and limitations must be considered. Results shown are highly relevant to improve our predictions of the responses of zooplankton to climate change stressors including OA. Future studies including long-term multigenerational exposure to multiple stressors (e.g. increased pCO2 and food shortage) are a priority to understand the adaptation capacity of common species and how the zooplankton communities will shift.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification impacts on zooplankton’

Early development and metabolic rate of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi under different scenarios of temperature and pCO2

Highlights

  • The temperature has a significant effect on the hatching time of C. royercresseyi.

  • Combination of pCO2 and temperature has a significant effect on survival in C. rogercresseyi.

  • The combination of pCO2 and temperature had no impact on the size of nauplius I, nauplius II and copepodid stage.

  • Only the temperature has a significant effect on oxygen consumption rate of C. royercresseyi.

Abstract

Anthropogenic CO2 emissions have led to ocean acidification and a rise in the temperature. The present study evaluates the effects of temperature (10, 15 and 20 °C) and pCO2 (400 and 1200 μatm) on the early development and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi. Only temperature has an effect on the hatching and development times of nauplius I. But both factors affected the development time of nauplius II (<temperature = longer development time). Copepodid survival time was also affected by temperature and pCO2, at 10 °C and 400 μatm, survival was 30 and 44% longer than at 15 and 20 °C. OCRs were impacted by temperature but not by pCO2. In all treatments, OCR was lower for nauplius II than for the copepodid. Our results show the need to further evaluate the effects of a combination of environmental drivers on the performance of C. rogercresseyi, in a changing and uncertain future.

Continue reading ‘Early development and metabolic rate of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi under different scenarios of temperature and pCO2’

Effects of temperature and pH on the egg production and hatching success of a common Korean copepod

The recent accelerated ocean acidification and global warming caused by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide may have an impact on the physiology and ecology of marine animals. This study was conducted to determine the egg production rate (EPR) and hatching success (EHS) of Acartia ohtsukai in response to the combined effects of an increase in temperature and a lower pH. Acartiaohtsukai with fresh surface seawater were collected in the northwestern Yeoja Bay of Korea in September 2017. The temperature and pH conditions applied included two different pH levels (representing the present: 7.9 and the future: 7.6) and three temperature values (26 °C, 28 °C, and 30 °C). In the pH 7.9, EPR significantly increased with increased temperature, but in pH 7.6, it significantly decreased as the temperature increased. EHS was lower in pH 7.6 than in pH 7.9. These results suggest that changes in the marine environment due to global warming and ocean acidification may affect Acartia populations and cause overall fluctuations in copepods of the genus Acartia.

Continue reading ‘Effects of temperature and pH on the egg production and hatching success of a common Korean copepod’

Changing carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of organic-matter export under ocean acidification

Ocean acidification (OA) will affect marine biotas from the organism to the ecosystem level. Yet, the consequences for the biological carbon pump and thereby the oceanic sink for atmospheric CO2 are still unclear. Here we show that OA considerably alters the C/N ratio of organic-matter export (C/Nexport), a key factor determining efficiency of the biological pump. By synthesizing sediment-trap data from in situ mesocosm studies in different marine biomes, we find distinct but highly variable impacts of OA on C/Nexport, reaching up to a 20% increase/decrease under partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) conditions projected for 2100. These changes are driven by pCO2 effects on a variety of plankton taxa and corresponding shifts in food-web structure. Notably, our findings suggest a pivotal role of heterotrophic processes in controlling the response of C/Nexport to OA, thus contradicting the paradigm of primary producers as the principal driver of biogeochemical responses to ocean change.

Continue reading ‘Changing carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of organic-matter export under ocean acidification’

The origin and diversification of pteropods precede past perturbations in the Earth’s carbon cycle

Pteropods are a group of planktonic gastropods that are widely regarded as biological indicators for assessing the impacts of ocean acidification. Their aragonitic shells are highly sensitive to acute changes in ocean chemistry. However, to gain insight into their potential to adapt to current climate change, we need to accurately reconstruct their evolutionary history and assess their responses to past changes in the Earth’s carbon cycle. Here, we resolve the phylogeny and timing of pteropod evolution with a phylogenomic dataset (2,654 genes) incorporating new data for 21 pteropod species and revised fossil evidence. In agreement with traditional taxonomy, we recovered molecular support for a division between “sea butterflies” (Thecosomata; mucus-web feeders) and “sea angels” (Gymnosomata; active predators). Molecular dating demonstrated that these two lineages diverged in the early Cretaceous, and that all main pteropod clades, including shelled, partially-shelled, and unshelled groups, diverged in the mid- to late Cretaceous. Hence, these clades originated prior to and subsequently survived major global change events, including the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), the closest analog to modern-day ocean acidification and warming. Our findings indicate that planktonic aragonitic calcifiers have shown resilience to perturbations in the Earth’s carbon cycle over evolutionary timescales.

Continue reading ‘The origin and diversification of pteropods precede past perturbations in the Earth’s carbon cycle’

Impacts of CO2 perturbation on the ecology and biogeochemistry of plankton communities during a simulated upwelling event: a mesocosm experiment in oligotrophic subtropical waters

The ocean is a major sink for anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2), taking up one third of fossil fuel CO2 annually. This causes pronounced shifts in marine carbonate chemistry, including decreasing seawater pH and carbonate saturation states. A growing body of scientific evidence indicates that these changes – summarized by the term ocean acidification (OA) – can significantly affect marine life, with potential consequences for food webs and biogeochemical cycles. Our current understanding of OA effects is largely based on laboratory experiments under rather artificial environmental conditions and with cultures of single species, thereby neglecting ecological interactions. Studies on the response of natural communities are still relatively rare, with the few existing community-level studies mostly conducted in eutrophic environments.

To close this knowledge gap and better understand how natural communities and food webs in oligotrophic environments respond to ocean acidification, an in situ mesocosm experiment was conducted in the subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean, off the island of Gran Canaria. To investigate how OA effects might differ between oligotrophic conditions and phases of high biological productivity, which regularly occur in response to upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in the study region, a deep-water upwelling event was simulated in the mesocosms three weeks into the experiment.

Continue reading ‘Impacts of CO2 perturbation on the ecology and biogeochemistry of plankton communities during a simulated upwelling event: a mesocosm experiment in oligotrophic subtropical waters’

Effects of temperature and food concentration on pteropod metabolism along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

Highlights

  • Measured respiration and excretion of the Antarctic pteropod Limacina.
  • Analyzed effects of future temperature and food conditions on pteropod metabolism.
  • Highest metabolism occurred under higher temperatures with less response to food.
  • Metabolic ratios of C, N, and P were all below the canonical Redfield ratio.
  • Pteropod metabolism responsive to ocean change, affecting biogeochemical cycles.

Abstract

Pteropods (pelagic snails) are abundant zooplankton in the Southern Ocean where they are important grazers of phytoplankton, prey for higher trophic levels, and sensitive to environmental change. The Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a highly dynamic and productive region that has undergone rapid warming, but little is known about how environmental changes there will affect pteropod physiology. In this study, the effects of warming seawater temperatures and shifting food availability on Limacina helicina antarctica metabolism (respiration and excretion) were determined by conducting shipboard experiments that exposed pteropods to a range of temperatures and phytoplankton (food) concentrations. Highest respiration (up to 69 μmol O2 gDW−1 h−1) and usually highest excretion rates occurred under higher temperature with more limited metabolic response to food concentration, indicating these factors do not always have an additive effect on pteropod metabolism. The proportion of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to total organic and inorganic dissolved constituents was high and was also significantly affected by shifts in temperature and food. Dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus (DOC, DON, and DOP) were on average 27, 51, and 11.5% of the total C, N, and P metabolized, respectively. The proportion of total N excreted as DON and the proportion of total P excreted as DOP were significantly affected by a combination of shifting temperature and food concentrations. There were no effects of temperature or food on DOC excretion (mean 8.79 μmol C gDW−1 h−1; range 0.44 to 44) as a proportion of total C metabolized. Metabolic O2:N ratio ranged from 2 to 9 and decreased significantly with increasing temperature and food, indicating a shift toward increased protein catabolism. Metabolic ratios of C, N, and P were all below the canonical Redfield ratio, which has implications for phytoplankton nutrient uptake and bacterial production. Respiration rates at ambient conditions of other WAP pteropods, and excretion rates for Clio pyramidata, were also measured, with respiration rates ranging from 24.39 (Spongiobranchaea australis) to 28.86 (L. h. antarctica) μmol O2 gDW−1 h−1. Finally, a CO2 perturbation experiment measuring L. h. antarctica metabolism under pre-industrial and elevated dissolved pCO2 conditions showed no significant change in mean L. h. antarctica respiration or excretion rates with higher pCO2. These insights into the metabolic response of pteropods to ocean variability increase our understanding of the role of zooplankton in biogeochemical cycles and help predict future responses to climate change.

Continue reading ‘Effects of temperature and food concentration on pteropod metabolism along the Western Antarctic Peninsula’


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