Posts Tagged 'video/audio'

From source to synthesis – improving flow of ocean carbon data (text & video)

OA Week 2021, From source to synthesis – improving flow of ocean carbon data

Dr. Helen Findlay, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Ms. Kirsten Isensee, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, France

Mr. Benjamin Pfeil, University of Bergen, Norway

Dr. Katherina Schoo, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, France

Description:

As data generating scientists, we have to find suitable data archives that are coherent with legal obligations of funders and that make it practical for access and visibility. In addition, data should be fit for purpose for synthesis products/reports in order to achieve greatest impact. The ocean acidification data landscape is a complex mix of data repositories, with varying audiences, purposes, meta and data requirements, as well as quality classifications and control mechanisms. Key to facilitating ocean acidification relevant data flow is communication among data producers, data managers and data users, addressing challenges and bringing together the community to find the best solutions. This discussion session of the OA week aims to continue ongoing and initiate new discussions around the following topics: 1. What are the current obstacles/challenges with respect to ocean acidification data flow in your region, your field of research? 2. Who should be taking part in ocean acidification data flow discussions – identification of main stakeholders? How can we improve data flow to meet the commitments for UN SDG 14.3.1, requirements of the funders and the wider benefits for our science and stakeholders that this unique opportunity brings in giving everyone access to datasets of known quality?

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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Advancing the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange OAIE (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Advancing the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange

Ms. Julianna Mullen, NERACOOS, USA

Description:

The Ocean Acidification Information Exchange (OAIE) is an online members-only forum dedicated to catalyzing response to ocean and coastal acidification through collaboration. The platform’s tools are designed to make three major activities as simple as possible: sharing information, facilitating person-to-person connections, and keeping information organized and searchable. Online “communities of practice” like the OAIE are increasingly popular with professionals working toward shared outcomes in part because they’re proven to be effective at accelerating discovery, and they can remove many barriers to participation associated with diverse geographic involvement. However, while the OAIE and others are positioned solely as professional environments built on a straightforward calculus of ask and answer, the psychology of community—the emotional reactions/responses of people sharing a space—is inextricably linked to the success of the collective and individual. Considering the OAIE’s steady growth and everincreasing diversity, plus the rising popularity of professional communities of practice in general, we will discuss what additional barriers to participation remain (technological and humanistic), how the OAIE and other communities can advance equitable access to resources, and how we as individuals interact with and benefit from community, especially through the lens of the pandemic.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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Carbonate chemistry and calcifying plankton in Scottish coastal waters (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub Session

Dr. Pablo León Díaz, Marine Scotland Science, UK

Description:

Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have a significant impact on calcifying plankton. This group plays a key role in the ocean food webs and global biogeochemical cycles and includes larvae of species of commercial importance for aquaculture and fishery industries (e.g. bivalves). However field studies on carbonate chemistry and calcifying plankton are scarce.

Operated by Marine Scotland Science, the Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs; http://dx.doi.org/10.7489/1881-1) monitoring site at Stonehaven is providing baseline information about the seasonality and interannual variability of carbonate chemistry as well as the plankton community in Scottish waters. Three years of monthly samples were analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the relationship between carbonate chemistry parameters and calcifying groups at Stonehaven, including coccolithophores, pelagic gastropods and the planktonic larvae of benthic bivalve species. SEM analyses revealed evidence of shell dissolution in all analysed species during the study period despite the seawater being supersaturated with respect to aragonite, with the most severe damaged observed during periods of decreasing aragonite saturation. These results suggest that seasonal and short-term changes in carbonate chemistry might affect the shell integrity of plankton calcifiers, also indicating that dissolution may appear under higher saturation values than previously assumed. This work also highlights the value of sustained observations to distinguish OA changes from natural variability and to assess the potential impacts of OA on marine ecosystems.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Marine observations of carbonate chemistry variability and OA state in Northwest Africa waters (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Africa Hub Session

Dr. Mohammed Idrissi, National Institute of Fisheries Research, Morocco

Description:

The Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) region supply very significant local and international fish resources, based largely on small pelagic fish and artisanal fisheries. Especially on the North West Africa Atlantic Sea, the fishery market contribute to economy of the region bordering this sea and provide an important food and employment to coastal communities. In 2017, the 30-year long EAF Nansen Program (FAO and Norway), began with studies on ocean acidification along the CCLME region. Here, we show the first results ocean acidification state from this new research theme focusing on the North West Africa waters (from Morocco (35°N) to Senegal (12°N). Between May 2017 and December 2019, samples were measured, on this region, onboard the R/V Dr. Fridtjof Nansen for total alkalinity and pH using potentiometric titration and spectrophotometric pH measurements, respectively. The other parameters describing the carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification state were derived from AT and pH, using the CO2SYS calculation program. The survey performed at twenty seven sections perpendicular from the coast (the mesopelagic transect included) with a total of 110 stations in the full water column. We found large variability along the coast, connected to salinity changes, primary production, temperature and biological processes.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Relevant OA research for science and society (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub

Dr. Richard Bellerby, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Norway

Description:

An understanding of the present state, variability and projections of coastal OA is necessary to facilitate appropriate management and investment strategies. This is in line with the Sustainable Development Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. One target for this goal is 14.3 stipulating the need to minimise and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels. Despite the challenges to ecosystems and ecosystem services expected from OA, measures to adapt to OA are still hard to come by. While OA is mentioned as an issue in regional management plans and in white- and green papers, for instance regional climate plans in Norway, there are few examples of concrete measures. This presentation reports on a study of OA in coastal Norway where stakeholders had critical roles in scientific design, sampling and data interpretation. The study confirmed that ocean acidification thresholds are already experienced in Norwegian coastal systems and will be a growing challenge. The projected timing for when critical thresholds will be crossed is locally site, depth and service dependent. The project´s co-design and the co-production of new knowledge on coastal OA were essential to deliver targeted, relevant and comprehensible scientific products for coastal users, regulators and industry.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Simplification of marine ecosystems under ocean acidification (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub Session

Dr. Ben Harvey, Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Description:

Human activities are rapidly changing the structure of coastal marine ecosystems, but the ecological consequences of these changes remain uncertain. Natural analogues of futuristic conditions are increasingly being used to assess the likely effects of rising atmospheric CO2 emissions on marine ecosystems. Here, using a CO2 seep in Japan, we show how ocean acidification causes habitat and biodiversity loss, resulting in the simplification of marine ecosystems. This simplification involves structurally complex habitat-forming species (including corals and larger macrophytes) being replaced by more homogenous and simple turf algal habitats. Such ecological shifts are concerning because they result in habitats that have less ecological and human value. Moreover, once these ecological shifts occur, OA-driven stabilising feedback loops ‘lock-in’ these novel turf systems making them particularly difficult to reverse. By understanding the ecological processes responsible for driving community shifts, we can better assess how communities and ecosystems are likely to be altered by ocean acidification. Taken together, we demonstrate how the simplification of marine habitats by increased CO2 levels will cascade through the ecosystem and will have severe consequences for the provision of goods and services.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Responses of Caulerpa with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms to elevated ocean acidification (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Aleluia Taise, School of Biological Science, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Description:

Caulerpa is a widely distributed genus of chlorophytes. They are important for their dietary, social, and coastal ecosystem values. Caulerpa is one of the rare few genera that have species both with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that allow active uptake of HCO3-. Two of the most common Caulerpa species in New Zealand, C. brownii and C. geminata, could have vastly different responses to ocean acidification (OA). This is because of their divergent dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake. C. geminata possesses a CCM while C. brownii does not have a CCM. We investigated growth, photo-physiology and DIC utilization responses by C. brownii and C. geminata at four mean seawater pH treatments (8.03, 7.93, 7.83 and 7.63). In all cases, mean and variability in growth rates of C. brownii increased under OA scenarios, while growth rates for C. geminata declined under OA. This concurs with predictions that non-CCM species will be gaining benefits from additional CO2, while species with a CCM may gain less benefits from additional CO2, while at the same time demonstrating that DIC use alone does not predict responses to OA. We show divergent responses of two Caulerpa species that could have implications for their future abundance in Australasia.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Responses of Caulerpa with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms to elevated ocean acidification (text & video)’

Ocean acidification at the Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Evelyn Ikelau Otto, Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC), Palau

Description:

This presentation will discuss some of the work that is going on at PICRC in regards to climate change, specifically Ocean Acidification. It will highlight the exciting work that has been conducted in Palau and at the Center as well as highlight some setbacks that were experienced as PICRC develops their OA and water quality monitoring programs.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Blue carbon restoration and ocean acidification in Fiji: a case study from Viti Levu Bay (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Miriama Vuiyasawa, The University of the South Pacific, Fiji

Description:

Blue Carbon ecosystems such as mangrove forests and seagrass meadows have the ability to sequester carbon dioxide and store fixed carbon. As a result of this sequestration, there is less dissolved carbon dioxide available in the ocean water column to form acidic compounds. Therefore, restoring blue carbon habitats can help mitigate the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coastal communities. In 2018 the Institute of Applied Sciences at the University of the South Pacific was awarded a 2-year project to pilot the use of blue carbon in local mitigation of OA in Fiji. The main objective was to increase coastal resilience through climate change mitigation and better understanding of the role of blue carbon in OA mitigation through support of an existing coastal restoration project. The project was conducted in 4 villages in Viti Levu Bay, Fiji Islands and activities involved mangrove forest restoration, monitoring ocean acidification, raising awareness about observations of ecosystem health at the restored site. The work also provided capacity building for local scientists and early career junior staff on OA monitoring. Discrete water samples were collected at all four sites on a monthly basis and chemical analyses were conducted using protocols from the GOA-ON and an In a Box equipment kit donated by the Ocean Foundation. Data collected includes pH, total alkalinity, salinity and water temperate from which other OA parameters were determined. Along with OA monitoring, a total of 0.7925 ha of mangrove forest (more than (6000 seedlings) was planted with the assistance of the local Navuniivi community. Long term monitoring and more restorative work is needed at the project sites to fully understand and assess the benefits of the restorative efforts and its potential mitigation of OA. Several challenges were encountered, particularly with equipment breakdown and maintenance, and the limited resources to perform monitoring work. Despite these challenges, the project successfully collected OA monitoring data, which was the first dataset for the area and thus contributed to SDG 14 goal for Fiji. The mangrove restorative work was also a huge achievement with great community buy-in that resulted in a successful community collaborative project.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Modern state of the aragonite saturation and carbon dioxide fluxes in the Kara and Laptev seas (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Arctic Hub Session

Dr. Alexander Polukhin, Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Description:

The processes occurring in the areas of the outer shelf and the continental slope of the Siberian epicontinental seas play a huge role in the regulation of the biogeochemical regime and substance fluxes, and the formation of biological productivity. These processes are associated with current climatic trends, since it is in the area of the Arctic continental slope that the current trend of a decrease in ice cover and an increase in the duration of the ice-free period in the Arctic is most pronounced. One of the most important characteristics of matter fluxes in Arctic ecosystems is the exchange of carbon dioxide at the ocean-atmosphere interface. As a result of our studies, it became obvious that, over a significant latitudinal extent of the water in the area of the outer shelf and continental slope of the Kara and Laptev seas, in the summer season, CO2 flows from the atmosphere into the surface layer of the sea. And the main factor affecting the aragonite saturation on the shallow shelf of the seas is the river runoff due to an increase in the removal of carbon in various forms from the land.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Ocean acidification dynamics in the marginal ice zone of the Barents Sea and Arctic Ocean (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Arctic Hub Session

Dr. Libby Jones, Institute of Marine Research, Norway

Description:

Seasonal cycling in carbon and nutrients, with implications for ocean acidification, was investigated in the context of changes in sea ice cover, meltwater inputs, mixing and biological processes in the Barents Sea and Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin). In August 2019, the summer ice edge was located 80N and the upper water column was generally warm and fresh. Primary production had reduced concentrations of nutrients and dissolved inorganic carbon (CT), particularly in the ice-free waters. North of the ice edge, meltwater inputs reduced total alkalinity (AT), the chemical buffering capacity of seawater, through dilution. By December, the winter ice pack extended to 78N and created more Arctic-like conditions. Mixing and remineralisation resulted in increased concentrations of nutrients and CT in the water column. The imprint of summer processes was observed with lower CT and AT in ice-covered surface waters. The central Barents Sea revealed low seasonality, where reduced AT and Arctic-like conditions characterized the water column. Atlantic Water inflow in the south and north supplied the surface layer with AT to counteract acidification effects. Future warming, loss of sea ice and Atlantification likely enhance biological carbon uptake, reduce effects of meltwater dilution and buffer against acidification in the Barents Sea. This study is a contribution to the Nansen Legacy project.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Arctic acidification over the 21st century co-driven by anthropogenic carbon increases & freshening (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Arctic Hub Session

Dr. Jens Terhaar, University of Bern, Switzerland

Description:

The Arctic Ocean is particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification due to its naturally low pH and saturation states. Here, we analyse ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean over the 21st century across models from the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). Compared to the previous model generation (CMIP5), models generally better simulate maximum sea surface densities in the Arctic Ocean and consequently the transport of Cant into the Arctic Ocean interior. Moreover, in CMIP6 the inter-model uncertainty of projected changes over the 21st century in Arctic Ocean saturation states of aragonite (Ωarag) and calcite (Ωcalc) averaged over the upper 1000 m is reduced by 44–64 %. The strong reduction in projection uncertainties of Ωarag and Ωcalc can be attributed to compensation between Cant uptake and total alkalinity reduction in the latest models. Specifically, models with a large increase in Arctic Ocean Cant over the 21st century tend to simulate a relatively weak concurrent freshening and alkalinity reduction, while ESMs with a small increase in Cant simulate a relatively strong freshening and concurrent total alkalinity reduction. Even under the low-emissions Shared Socioeconomic Pathway 1-2.6 (SSP1-2.6), basin-wide averaged Ωarag undersaturation in the upper 1000 m occurs before the end of the century.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Role of marine macroalgae in the pH regulation in an eutrophic Argentinean coastal area (in Spanish) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, LAOCA (Latin America & Caribbean) Hub Session

Dr. María Eugenia Becherucci, Laboratorio de Ecología, Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (IIMyC: UNMdP-CONICET), Argentina

Description:

Nutrient input drives macroalgal blooms and increases in photosynthetic activity in coastal ecosystems. An intense macroalgal photosynthetic activity can increase the surrounding pH and counteract the acidification that often follows an eutrophication process. This hypothesis was tested with field sampling and experiments in a macrotidal (up to 9 m in amplitude) coastal system within a semi-desert region with contrasting eutrophic conditions and Ulva lactuca blooms in the northern Argentinean Patagonia (San Antonio Bay). The results indicate that daily pH variability during low tide could be controlled by the photosynthetic activity of Ulva lactuca under eutrophic conditions. At seasonal scale, the pH variations were related to environmental features, particularly seawater temperature. Both environmental (i.e. high solar radiation, negligible freshwater inputs and large tidal action) and anthropogenic nutrient inputs into the studied area promote the Ulva lactuca blooms, which in turn increases the surrounding pH in well oxygenated seawater through the intense photosynthetic activity.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Role of marine macroalgae in the pH regulation in an eutrophic Argentinean coastal area (in Spanish) (text & video)’

Integrated assessment of the risks to ocean acidification in the Northern high latitudes (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Arctic Hub Session

Dr. Nina Bednarsek, Southern California Coastal Water Research project (SCCWRP), USA

Description:

Exposure to the impact of ocean acidification (OA) is increasing in high-latitudinal productive habitats. Pelagic calcifying snails (pteropods), a significant component of the diet of economically important fish, are found in high abundance in these regions. This presentation will focus on the integrated risk assessment in the Eastern Pacific subpolar gyre, including the Gulf of Alaska (GoA), Bering Sea, and Amundsen Gulf. The risk for pteropod populations was determined by integrating measures of OA exposure, biological sensitivity, and resilience. Exposure was based on physical-chemical hydrographic observations and regional biogeochemical model outputs. Biological sensitivity was based on pteropod morphometrics and shell-building processes, including shell dissolution, density and thickness. Resilience and adaptive capacity were based on species diversity and spatial connectivity, derived from the particle tracking modelling. An integrated risk evaluation based on multiple approaches assumes a high risk for pteropod population persistence with intensification of OA in the high latitude eastern North Pacific. Such comprehensive understanding would permit improved prediction of ecosystem change relevant to effective fisheries resource management, as well as a more robust foundation for monitoring ecosystem health and investigating OA in high-latitudinal habitats.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Model projections of ocean acidification in the Arctic (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Arctic Hub Session Dr. Nadja Steiner, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Canada

Description:

We will present an evaluation of regional trends in ocean acidification and accompanying environmental stressors for the Arctic. Evaluations will be presented for historical and projection runs and for a variety of CMIP5 and CMIP6 models and scenarios. The models tend to show high consistency in ocean acidification trends, but differ in their initial conditions, which leads to constant biases among the models. Model projections show little difference for different scenarios over a 10-20 year timescale, but diverge afterwards with clear differences in ocean acidification for high and low emission scenarios. Several regions show continuous aragonite undersaturation already within the historical time period (before 2015).

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Adaptive management in Miramare, Italy’s first Marine Protected Area (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Mediterranean Hub Session

Mr. Saul Ciriaco, L’Area Marina Protetta di Miramare, Italy

Description:

Since 1995 he has been part of the management staff of the Miramare MPA (managed by WWF Italy on behalf of the Ministry of the Environment), as the person responsible for monitoring and research activities in the sea. In recent years he has been working with other research institutes on environmental restoration projects on marine forests and Pinna nobilis. He is a member of the Shoreline Research Cooperative, on behalf of which he works on projects related to the monitoring and management of MPAs in the Mediterranean.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Observatory for the study of OA in Cuba. First results and challenges for its sustainability (in Spanish) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, LAOCA (Latin America & Caribbean) Hub ​Session

Mr. Miguel Gomez Batista, Centro de Estudios Ambientales, Cuba

Description:

Cuban Observatory for the Study of Ocean Acidification was created in 2017 through International Collaboration Project financed by International Atomic Agency Technical Cooperation Department and National Science Project funded by Science Ministry of Cuba. The observatory has different sections dealing with the i) measurement of carbonate cycle variables (pH, AT) in seawater (Field and laboratory measurements), ii) use of natural archives to reconstruct temperature and pH profiles (historical trend) and iii) laboratory experiments to assess the effect of OA over local marine species. The main results of the observatory until date are linked with the report of carbon cycle variables at IODE web page as part of national compromise with SDG 14.3.1. Some challenges for regular functioning of the observatory are related with the access to Certified Reference Materials, the calibration and maintenance of in situ probes and networking collaboration at national and international level.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Observatory for the study of OA in Cuba. First results and challenges for its sustainability (in Spanish) (text & video)’

Diseño de monitoreo: química de carbonatos frente al Ecuador (in Spanish) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, LAOCA (Latin America & Caribbean) Hub Session

Ms. Patricia Macías Mora, Instituto Público de Investigación en Acuicultura y Pesca, Ecuador

Description:

El Instituto Público de Investigación en Acuicultura y Pesca a través del programa institucional denominado Variabilidad climática, genera un sistema de monitoreo de variables físico químicas y biológicas relevantes para determinar la acidificación del océano en dos sitios frente a la costa ecuatoriana, Salinas y Puerto López, aplicando los procedimientos operacionales estandarizados (SOP) para muestras de agua.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Diseño de monitoreo: química de carbonatos frente al Ecuador (in Spanish) (text & video)’

Seacarb for CO2 system calculations with R tutorial (text & video)

A basic tutorial on how to use two basic functions in the carbonate chemistry package “Seacarb” for R.

  • 1) Install and load the Seacarb package (0:49)
  • 2) An example calculation where we use the carb function to constrain the carbonate system based on two measured input variables. (1:26)
  • 3) An example calculation where use the “errors” function to constrain the propagated uncertainty in the carbonate system, which originates from analytical uncertainty in various input variables. (9:13)

Another video with a basic tutorial on the CO2SYS macro for excel can be found here:

Further reading (open access):

Continue reading ‘Seacarb for CO2 system calculations with R tutorial (text & video)’

The Olympic Coast as a Sentinel: integrated social-ecological vulnerability assessments (text & video)

OA Week 2021, North American Hub Session

Dr. Jan Newton & Dr. Melissa Poe, University of Washington, USA

Description:

We present a place-based, transdisciplinary approach to assess ocean acidification vulnerability on a regional scale, highlighting a collaborative social-ecological research effort. Our study area, the Olympic Coast of Washington State, has been home for millennia to four coastal treaty tribes, and is already experiencing effects of ocean acidification, hypoxia, and marine heatwaves, which pose risks to marine resources that coastal communities and tribes depend on for their well-being. We bring together a variety of biophysical and social data across ocean spatial gradients and human systems to better understand the whole, to anticipate the effect of cumulative stressors, and to outline adaptive responses for healthy and resilient communities. Our place-based approach to assess regional vulnerability follows a process: scope local risk and priority needs; understand social importance of marine species; analyze variability in chemical and biological data; project future ocean conditions; assess frequency, duration, and location of harmful oceanographic events; evaluate risks to resources important to community partners; analyze socioeconomic conditions; assess social vulnerability to OA; identify community-driven strategies to respond to threats and increase adaptive capacity; provide critical information to decision-makers to prepare for and respond to OA vulnerabilities; monitor, evaluate, and reiterate. Working collaboratively, the project has strengthened regional partnerships, brought together a diverse constituency, and shown more deeply how connected things are and need to be going forward.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘The Olympic Coast as a Sentinel: integrated social-ecological vulnerability assessments (text & video)’

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