Posts Tagged 'video/audio'

The threat of ocean acidification: what you need to know (audio & video)

Ocean acidification is a topic that has been gaining more attention in recent years, and for good reason. It is a serious threat to the health and well-being of our oceans, and ultimately to the survival of countless species that call the ocean home.

In this video, we will explore what ocean acidification is, how it occurs, and the impacts it has on the environment. We will also discuss the primary drivers of ocean acidification, including the burning of fossil fuels and other human activities that release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Through stunning visuals and clear explanations, we will delve into the science behind ocean acidification and why it is such a critical issue. We will also examine what steps can be taken to mitigate its effects and preserve the health of our oceans for future generations.

Whether you are a student, scientist, or concerned citizen, this video will provide a comprehensive overview of ocean acidification and its implications. Join us on this journey to understand one of the greatest challenges facing our planet today.

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GOA-ON webinar: mediterranean calcifying organisms under ocean acidification and warming (audio & video)

Dr. Chloe Carbonne (Laboratory of Oceanography of Villefranche, Sorbonne University, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France) and Maximiliano Szkope (University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain) will be presenting their work on calcifying organisms in the Mediterranean Sea under the effects of ocean acidification and warming.

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Ove Hoegh-Guldberg | coral reefs: from climate victims to survivors (video & text)

Prof Ove Hoegh-Guldberg was among the first to sound the alarm of the threat posed by ocean warming and acidification to marine ecosystems, following pioneering research into coral bleaching and mortality.

In his 29 November keynote at the Frontiers Forum, Ove gave an update on coral reef health globally and an outlook for the future. The session was attended by over 1,500 representatives from science, policy, and business across the world.

Ove’s talk was followed by a discussion with renowned coral scientists on how to protect and restore reefs so they flourish for centuries to come:

  • Prof Maoz Fine | Professor, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
  • Lisa Carne | Director/Founder, Fragments of Hope, Belize
  • Dr Nancy Knowlton | Sant Chair for Marine Science Emerita, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, USA

Ove led the team that revealed the molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching and developed the first projections of mass coral mortality. He heads global research, discussions, and action on the science and solutions to rapid climate change – including as Coordinating Lead Author for the ‘Oceans’ chapter for the Fifth Assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Coordinating Lead Author on the ‘Impacts’ chapter of the IPCC Special Report on 1.5°C. He also conceived and led the innovative XL-Catlin Seaview Survey, which visually recorded the health of over 1,000 km of coral reefs across 25 countries. Ove is Professor of Marine Studies at the University of Queensland, Australia.

The Frontiers Forum showcases science-led solutions for healthy lives on a healthy planet. Watch previous sessions at https://forum.frontiersin.org

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Ocean acidification lessons: shell shifts (video)

Ocean Acidification Lessons: Shell Shifts

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Ocean acidification lessons: understanding oceans and coastal acidification (video)

Ocean Acidification Lessons: Understanding Oceans and Coastal Acidification
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Ocean acidification adaptation and resilience in Africa (video)

Coastal communities in many African countries rely heavily on the sea for economic, social, and nutritional services. Ocean acidification has the potential to negatively affect marine ecosystems important to these communities. The losses would be alarming for the African continent. The IAEA is working with local, regional and international partners to understand and undress potential impacts and solutions to ocean acidification in Africa.

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Behavioural responses of fish to high CO2/low pH conditions observed at natural analogues (video & text)

Prof Tim Ravasi and Dr Davide Spatafora present their research on how the molecular basis and behavioural adjustments reveal potential local adaptation to acidifying oceans, a lesson from natural analogues, the second webinar from the International CO2 Natural Analogues (ICONA) Network. The first response by animals to a changing environment is predominantly through modification of their behaviour. In this context, investigating behavioural responses of fish living under low-pH/high-CO2 conditions (e.g. off volcanic seep sites) may contribute to a better understanding of how marine species might adjust or adapt to environmental conditions under projected ocean change scenarios. We carried out field-based observations and translocation experiments in the Vulcano island natural CO2 seep (southern Italy) to assess whether there is evidence for local behavioural adaptation and/or acclimatization of fish after long and short-term exposure to ocean acidification conditions predicted to occur by the end of this century. The responses of two temperate fish species, characterized by a limited home range, have been investigated and compared between fish from low-pH/high pCO2 sites and fish from control sites. Furthermore, understanding the molecular underpinnings responsible for acclimatization to acidified waters, by means of an integrated study of the brain transcriptional program of wild fish species, can elucidate on the variation in responses. We collected 130 individuals of six different reef fish species from a natural volcanic CO2 seep and nearby control reefs in Papua New Guinea. Differences in brain gene expression in fish from CO2 seeps compared to fish from control sites as well as differences among species identified the molecular pathways controlling the cellular responses to elevated CO2. These studies provide a broader understanding as to the behavioural and molecular alterations crucial for coping with naturally elevated CO2 conditions.

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Symposium High CO2 – Lima (audio & video)

All presentations from the 5th International Symposium on the Ocean in a High CO2 World (13-16 September 2022) have been posted on the Symposium YouTube channel. All talks are labeled by day, room and theme of participation. The description of each video lists the presentations captured in each video. 

Plenary talks will always remain available indefinitely and other talks will be available for one month only.

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Two poles, one common future – Richard Bellerby: ocean acidification (video & text)

In a series of short video interviews, the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation together with its partners in The Polar Initiative – SCAR, IASC and the Oceanographic Institute of Monaco – invited polar scientists and specialists to give a voice to polar regions, calling for a greater protection of Arctic and Antarctic regions and for shedding a light on the benefit they represent for the Planet and Humanity.

Richard Bellerby, Director SKLEC-NIVA Centre for Marine and Coastal Climate Research, states that “ocean acidification is one of the biggest challenges that we have to date (…), that will cause the local if not total extinction of some crucial species within the ocean.” According to him, “we have get the message out”, to the media and to the general public, as it is happening faster than ever before.

Visit https://www.thepolarinitiative.org/ for more information.

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Emisión en directo de symposium high CO2 – Lima (video) (in Spanish)

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Emisión en directo de symposium high CO2 – Lima (video) (in Spanish)

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This is CDR ep.49: MRV for ocean-based CDR methods with Dr. Jessica Cross, NOAA (video & text)

In this episode of This Is CDR, OpenAir welcomes NOAA Research Oceanographer Dr. Jessica Cross to discuss the challenges associated with measurement, reporting, and verification (MRV) of ocean-based CDR methods, and how we can seek to address them in a climate-relevant time-frame.

About our Guest. – https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/people/dr-j…

Dr. Jessica N. Cross is a research oceanographer with the NOAA in Seattle, WA. Her current research focuses on carbon biogeochemistry and ocean acidification in Arctic regions, and especially along the Alaskan coast. The main goal is to better understand how acidification processes interact with natural biogeochemical cycles, and eventually to detect geochemical and biological impacts of acidification in marine systems. Dr. Cross conducts her research across a variety of platforms, including ship-based measurements, moorings, and mobile autonomous platforms like gliders and drones, through NOAA’s Innovative Technology for Arctic Exploration Program. She also broadly participates in the Arctic research community through the North American Carbon Program, the Ocean Carbon Biogeochemistry Program, the Pacific Arctic Group, and the Interagency Research Policy Committee collaboration teams.

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Emisión en directo de symposium high CO2 – Lima (video) (in Spanish)

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Emisión en directo de symposium high CO2 – Lima (video) (in Spanish)

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Ocean acidification monitoring and scientific research in the PI-TOA region (text & video)

This month’s webinar, “Ocean Acidification Monitoring and Scientific Research in the PI-TOA Region” was held on August 25, 11am Fiji. The webinar was moderated by Dr Kim Currie with presentations by Dr Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt, Associate Professor Patila Amosa and Ms Luia Taise. The three speakers spanned topics such as establishing a pH time-series on the Suva reef, the effects of ocean acidification on organismal calcification such as corals and bryozoans, and the impacts on the photosynthetic physiology of a green seaweed. These research topics are important in understanding the impact of ocean acidification on coastal ecosystems of the Pacific.

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Francois Morel: the effect of ocean acidification on marine phytoplankton (text & video)

Francois Morel, Princeton University, presents “The Effect of Ocean Acidification on Marine Phytoplankton” at the Dreyfus Symposium on Environmental Chemistry. This symposium was held at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society on March 22, 2022.

For more information, visit: www.dreyfus.org.

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Monitoring ocean acidification in Alaska’s marine ecosystem (audio & video)

Title: Monitoring ocean acidification in Alaska’s marine ecosystem

Speaker: Natalie Monacci, MSc, University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, Ocean Acidification Research Center, Fairbanks, AK

EcoFOCI 2021 Fall Seminar Series

This seminar is part of NOAA EcoFOCI (Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations)’s bi-annual seminar series that are focused on the ecosystems of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea and the US Arctic to improve understanding of ecosystem dynamics and applications of that understanding to the management of living marine resources. EcoFOCI is a joint research program between the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (NOAA/ NMFS/ AFSC) and the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA/ OAR/ PMEL). Visit the EcoFOCI webpage for more information, https://www.ecofoci.noaa.gov/

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GOA-ON webinar: natural analogues and the future of coral communities and their biodiversity (audio & video)

On 21 July 2022, Dr. Sylvain Agostini and Dr. James D. Reimer from the International CO2 Natural Analogues (ICONA) Network joined the GOA-ON webinar series to discuss “What natural analogues can teach us about the future of coral communities and their understudied biodiversity.” The talk highlighted natural analogue research focusing on the effects on and resilience of both scleractinian corals and zoantharians to understand adaptation mechanisms that will determine the shape and diversity of future coral communities. ICONA will join the GOA-ON webinar series again in the coming months to discuss natural analogues and fish communities.

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World Oceans Day 2022: What is ocean acidification?

The IAEA celebrates the United Nations World Oceans Day, 8 June, to raise awareness of the benefits derived from the ocean. While the livelihoods of more than three billion people depend on oceanic resources, the ocean also provides a large fraction of the oxygen we breathe and absorbs greenhouse gases, mitigating their effects in the atmosphere. This year’s theme, Revitalization: Collective Action for the Ocean, highlights the importance of working together to restore the health of our oceans. At the 2022 UN Ocean Conference, 27 June – 1 July, the IAEA will host a side event, in cooperation with the Circulate Initiative and the Incubation Network, to discuss actions to address marine plastic pollution.

Playing a key role in the Earth’s climate and weather systems, as well as in the global carbon cycle, the ocean is an immeasurable force of nature. However, human activities have fundamentally altered the ocean’s chemical composition. Since the late 1980s, 95 per cent of open ocean surface water has become more acidic. Oceans absorb about 30 per cent of carbon dioxide (CO2) we produce, reducing the pH of seawater. This process is known as ocean acidification. With atmospheric CO2 levels 50 per cent above pre-industrial levels, the problem is getting worse.

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Ocean acidification (video)

Year 12 marine Science

Unit 3 Topic 2 Changes on the Reef

Ocean Equilibria pH geological processes ocean acidification carbonic acid carbonate bicarbonate

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