Posts Tagged 'presentation'

Live investigation: an ‘acid’ Arctic | ages 7-11 / KS2 (video)

To interact fully with this live lesson please visit https://encounteredu.com/live-lessons…

This fun live lesson investigation aims to show how water becomes more acidic when carbon dioxide is bubbled through it. It demonstrates the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and a process called ocean acidification, a change in the pH or acidity of the ocean.

Students will also observe over time the effects of acid on chalk (standing in as an example of animals with ‘chalky’ structures or skeletons).

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TarApprendre : pH et acidification de l’océan (video – in French)

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The origin and impacts of ocean acidification – part 1 (text & video)

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.

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The origin and impacts of ocean acidification – part 3 (text & video)

Richard Feely discusses new findings about how increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic, and how that will affect ocean ecosystems and the marine animals that inhabit them.

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Contribution of nuclear science and technology to climate change adaptation: part 2 (video)

Nuclear Science Helps to Adapt to Climate Change: COP26 | IAEA

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Ocean acidification and the Changing Seas (video & text)

In this video, made for World Oceans Day 2020, Christina explains ocean acidification, its relationship with climate change and its effects on marine environments.

Dr Christina Roggatz is a Chemical Ecologist based at the Energy & Environment Institute at the University of Hull, where she specialises in ocean acidification.

Christina has worked closely with The Deep, Hull on an exhibit called Changing Seas and explains the science supporting that exhibit.

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Ocean Acidification Research for Sustainability (OARS) overview and community discussion – ocean lab (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Ocean Acidification Research for Sustainability (OARS) Overview and Community Discussion, a UN Decade Laboratory Satellite Activity

Dr. Jan Newton, University of Washington, USA

Dr. Steve Widdicombe, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Description:

In the summer of 2021, the UN Decade of Ocean Science formally endorsed GOA-ON’s proposed programme “Ocean Acidification Research for Sustainability”, also known as OARS. This programme aims to provide society with the observational and scientific evidence needed to sustainably identify, monitor, mitigate and adapt to ocean acidification, from local to global scales. The objective of this community discussion today is to receive input from the global ocean acidification community as to what support is required and how GOA-ON can best enhance ocean acidification observation and research capacity, taking into consideration local and regional specificities. We invite you to engage in the discussion to identify strategies and partners, supporting OARS and GOA-ON, to increase capacity in OA monitoring and research efforts within your respective regions, countries, and institutions. We hope to gather insights on which particular aspects of OARS could be expanded or improved upon in order to achieve the UN Decade Action outcomes.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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A community discussion around CO2-in-seawater certified reference materials (CRMs) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, A Community Discussion Around CO2-in-Seawater Certified Reference Materials (CRMs)

Dr. Michael Acquafredda, Ms. Courtney Cochran, Dr. Shallin Busch, & Dr. Libby Jewett, NOAA, USA

Dr. Regina Easley, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA

Dr. Andrew Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA

Dr. Maribel Garcia Ibanez, University of East Anglia, UK

Dr. Maciej Telszewski, International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP), Poland

Dr. Peter Swarzenski, & Ms. Ashley Bantelman, International Atomic Energy Agency OA-ICC, Monaco

Dr. Tobias Steinhoff, Dr. Elaine McDonagh, & Dr. Richard Sanders, Norwegian Research Center (NORCE), Norway

Dr. Kim Currie, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand

Description:

Reference materials (RMs) are fundamental for accurate and precise measurements of seawater CO2 system parameters and research related to ocean acidification and oceanic carbon cycles. Currently, there is a single source of RMs for total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and pH in seawater and a calibrated HCl titrant for seawater alkalinity analysis (Dickson Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography). However, the US Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification (US IWG-OA) and various international organizations are working to increase the resilience of production and distribution of CO2-in-seawater RMs. In this community discussion session, participants will receive status updates from American & European. Additionally, the US IWG-OA will share its findings from the “CO2-in seawater Reference Materials Community Survey” that was distributed earlier this year. There will be an extended Question & Answer panel discussion, and audience members will be given ample time to ask questions and share their thoughts.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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OA data sharing – GOA-ON data explorer and the SDG 14.3.1 data portal (text & video)

OA Week 2021, OA Data Sharing – GOA-ON Data Explorer and the SDG 14.3.1 Portal

Mr. Trevor Eakes, GOA-ON Secretariat, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco

Dr. Katherina Schoo, GOA-ON Secretariat, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, France

Dr. Kerri Dobson, GOA-ON Secretariat, NOAA OAP, USA

Description:

Join our community discussion where we will introduce the GOA-ON Data Explorer (http://portal.goa-on.org/Explorer) and the SDG 14.3.1 Data Portal (https://oa.iode.org/), two community based online tools to showcase and share your ocean acidification observations. We invite all researchers working on ocean acidification, data managers, scientists with geospatial backgrounds and those working on open science to discuss innovative approaches and solutions for the development of data portals in the coming decade. We will consider questions such as: how can ocean acidification data portals evolve to meet the challenges of the coming decade? What new sources of information could be incorporated? What visualizations would you find helpful? How can we better incentivize and inspire scientists to submit and share their data? What technical resources are available to us? GOA-ON is looking to establish a working group focused on ocean acidification data sharing and the strengthening of the GOA-ON Data Explorer – all interested are welcome to join and contact the Secretariat at secretariat@goa-on.org.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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Introducing the New Pacific Islands Regional OA training hub & other capacity development activities (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Introducing the New Pacific Islands Regional OA Training Hub and Other Upcoming Capacity Development Activities

Ms. Alexis Valauri-Orton, Ms. Courtnie Park, & Dr. Kaitlyn Lowder, The Ocean Foundation, USA

Dr. Michael Acquafredda, Dr. Kerri Dobson, & Ms. Meredith Kurz, NOAA, USA

Dr. Katy Soapi, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Fiji

Dr. Kim Currie, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand

Dr. Gilianne Brodie & Dr. Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt, The University of the South Pacific (USP), Fiji

Description:

Are you a researcher or student based in the Pacific Islands? Are you looking for training, equipment, and other support? This community discussion session will provide information and updates about on-going capacity development activities organized by the TOF, NOAA, and the US Department of State. Their goal is to enhance and sustain ocean acidification monitoring and research capacity in the Pacific Islands region.

Come to this session to learn about:

  • a new Regional Training Hub in Suva, Fiji, hosted by the Institute of Applied Science at USP, SPC, NIWA, and the University of Otago (UO)
  • an upcoming Ocean Teachers Global Academy training
  • an RFP for OA monitoring equipment grants, specifically geared toward Pacific Islanders
  • a Masters Student Fellowship, specifically geared toward Pacific Islanders . There will be an extended Question and Answer panel discussion, and interested audience members will be given ample opportunities to ask questions and share their thoughts.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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OA social vulnerability assessments community discussion (text & video)

OA Week 2021, OA Social Vulnerability Assessments Community Discussion

Ms. Courtney Cochran, NOAA OAP, USA

Ms. Jessie Turner, International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification, USA

Ms. Darcy Dugan, Alaska Ocean Observation System / Alaska OA Network, USA

Dr. Jan Newton & Dr. Melissa Poe, University of Washington, USA

Description:

Ocean acidification is expected to threaten many marine resources that human communities rely on for food security, livelihoods, and cultural value. While knowing the vulnerability of different communities can help inform where management actions are needed, understanding social vulnerability to ocean acidification remains a challenge. This session will highlight ongoing efforts to address vulnerability in the US and lead to discussions about how other regions can start to think about assessing local vulnerability to OA. The US Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification (US IWG-OA) will share updates on a new report that will characterize ecological and social vulnerability to ocean acidification on a global scale. Participants will also hear from panelists in the U.S. who have worked on regional vulnerability assessments or directly with stakeholders, with a focus on how to take first steps and overcome challenges such as data limitations. A large portion of the session will be dedicated to a Question & Answer session with the panel, and audience members will be encouraged to think about how social vulnerability could be addressed in their own region.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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From source to synthesis – improving flow of ocean carbon data (text & video)

OA Week 2021, From source to synthesis – improving flow of ocean carbon data

Dr. Helen Findlay, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK

Ms. Kirsten Isensee, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, France

Mr. Benjamin Pfeil, University of Bergen, Norway

Dr. Katherina Schoo, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, France

Description:

As data generating scientists, we have to find suitable data archives that are coherent with legal obligations of funders and that make it practical for access and visibility. In addition, data should be fit for purpose for synthesis products/reports in order to achieve greatest impact. The ocean acidification data landscape is a complex mix of data repositories, with varying audiences, purposes, meta and data requirements, as well as quality classifications and control mechanisms. Key to facilitating ocean acidification relevant data flow is communication among data producers, data managers and data users, addressing challenges and bringing together the community to find the best solutions. This discussion session of the OA week aims to continue ongoing and initiate new discussions around the following topics: 1. What are the current obstacles/challenges with respect to ocean acidification data flow in your region, your field of research? 2. Who should be taking part in ocean acidification data flow discussions – identification of main stakeholders? How can we improve data flow to meet the commitments for UN SDG 14.3.1, requirements of the funders and the wider benefits for our science and stakeholders that this unique opportunity brings in giving everyone access to datasets of known quality?

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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Advancing the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange OAIE (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Advancing the Ocean Acidification Information Exchange

Ms. Julianna Mullen, NERACOOS, USA

Description:

The Ocean Acidification Information Exchange (OAIE) is an online members-only forum dedicated to catalyzing response to ocean and coastal acidification through collaboration. The platform’s tools are designed to make three major activities as simple as possible: sharing information, facilitating person-to-person connections, and keeping information organized and searchable. Online “communities of practice” like the OAIE are increasingly popular with professionals working toward shared outcomes in part because they’re proven to be effective at accelerating discovery, and they can remove many barriers to participation associated with diverse geographic involvement. However, while the OAIE and others are positioned solely as professional environments built on a straightforward calculus of ask and answer, the psychology of community—the emotional reactions/responses of people sharing a space—is inextricably linked to the success of the collective and individual. Considering the OAIE’s steady growth and everincreasing diversity, plus the rising popularity of professional communities of practice in general, we will discuss what additional barriers to participation remain (technological and humanistic), how the OAIE and other communities can advance equitable access to resources, and how we as individuals interact with and benefit from community, especially through the lens of the pandemic.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org.

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Carbonate chemistry and calcifying plankton in Scottish coastal waters (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub Session

Dr. Pablo León Díaz, Marine Scotland Science, UK

Description:

Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to have a significant impact on calcifying plankton. This group plays a key role in the ocean food webs and global biogeochemical cycles and includes larvae of species of commercial importance for aquaculture and fishery industries (e.g. bivalves). However field studies on carbonate chemistry and calcifying plankton are scarce.

Operated by Marine Scotland Science, the Scottish Coastal Observatory (SCObs; http://dx.doi.org/10.7489/1881-1) monitoring site at Stonehaven is providing baseline information about the seasonality and interannual variability of carbonate chemistry as well as the plankton community in Scottish waters. Three years of monthly samples were analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the relationship between carbonate chemistry parameters and calcifying groups at Stonehaven, including coccolithophores, pelagic gastropods and the planktonic larvae of benthic bivalve species. SEM analyses revealed evidence of shell dissolution in all analysed species during the study period despite the seawater being supersaturated with respect to aragonite, with the most severe damaged observed during periods of decreasing aragonite saturation. These results suggest that seasonal and short-term changes in carbonate chemistry might affect the shell integrity of plankton calcifiers, also indicating that dissolution may appear under higher saturation values than previously assumed. This work also highlights the value of sustained observations to distinguish OA changes from natural variability and to assess the potential impacts of OA on marine ecosystems.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Marine observations of carbonate chemistry variability and OA state in Northwest Africa waters (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Africa Hub Session

Dr. Mohammed Idrissi, National Institute of Fisheries Research, Morocco

Description:

The Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) region supply very significant local and international fish resources, based largely on small pelagic fish and artisanal fisheries. Especially on the North West Africa Atlantic Sea, the fishery market contribute to economy of the region bordering this sea and provide an important food and employment to coastal communities. In 2017, the 30-year long EAF Nansen Program (FAO and Norway), began with studies on ocean acidification along the CCLME region. Here, we show the first results ocean acidification state from this new research theme focusing on the North West Africa waters (from Morocco (35°N) to Senegal (12°N). Between May 2017 and December 2019, samples were measured, on this region, onboard the R/V Dr. Fridtjof Nansen for total alkalinity and pH using potentiometric titration and spectrophotometric pH measurements, respectively. The other parameters describing the carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification state were derived from AT and pH, using the CO2SYS calculation program. The survey performed at twenty seven sections perpendicular from the coast (the mesopelagic transect included) with a total of 110 stations in the full water column. We found large variability along the coast, connected to salinity changes, primary production, temperature and biological processes.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Relevant OA research for science and society (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub

Dr. Richard Bellerby, Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Norway

Description:

An understanding of the present state, variability and projections of coastal OA is necessary to facilitate appropriate management and investment strategies. This is in line with the Sustainable Development Goal 14: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. One target for this goal is 14.3 stipulating the need to minimise and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels. Despite the challenges to ecosystems and ecosystem services expected from OA, measures to adapt to OA are still hard to come by. While OA is mentioned as an issue in regional management plans and in white- and green papers, for instance regional climate plans in Norway, there are few examples of concrete measures. This presentation reports on a study of OA in coastal Norway where stakeholders had critical roles in scientific design, sampling and data interpretation. The study confirmed that ocean acidification thresholds are already experienced in Norwegian coastal systems and will be a growing challenge. The projected timing for when critical thresholds will be crossed is locally site, depth and service dependent. The project´s co-design and the co-production of new knowledge on coastal OA were essential to deliver targeted, relevant and comprehensible scientific products for coastal users, regulators and industry.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Simplification of marine ecosystems under ocean acidification (text & video)

OA Week 2021, Northeast Atlantic Hub Session

Dr. Ben Harvey, Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Description:

Human activities are rapidly changing the structure of coastal marine ecosystems, but the ecological consequences of these changes remain uncertain. Natural analogues of futuristic conditions are increasingly being used to assess the likely effects of rising atmospheric CO2 emissions on marine ecosystems. Here, using a CO2 seep in Japan, we show how ocean acidification causes habitat and biodiversity loss, resulting in the simplification of marine ecosystems. This simplification involves structurally complex habitat-forming species (including corals and larger macrophytes) being replaced by more homogenous and simple turf algal habitats. Such ecological shifts are concerning because they result in habitats that have less ecological and human value. Moreover, once these ecological shifts occur, OA-driven stabilising feedback loops ‘lock-in’ these novel turf systems making them particularly difficult to reverse. By understanding the ecological processes responsible for driving community shifts, we can better assess how communities and ecosystems are likely to be altered by ocean acidification. Taken together, we demonstrate how the simplification of marine habitats by increased CO2 levels will cascade through the ecosystem and will have severe consequences for the provision of goods and services.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Responses of Caulerpa with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms to elevated ocean acidification (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Aleluia Taise, School of Biological Science, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Description:

Caulerpa is a widely distributed genus of chlorophytes. They are important for their dietary, social, and coastal ecosystem values. Caulerpa is one of the rare few genera that have species both with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that allow active uptake of HCO3-. Two of the most common Caulerpa species in New Zealand, C. brownii and C. geminata, could have vastly different responses to ocean acidification (OA). This is because of their divergent dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake. C. geminata possesses a CCM while C. brownii does not have a CCM. We investigated growth, photo-physiology and DIC utilization responses by C. brownii and C. geminata at four mean seawater pH treatments (8.03, 7.93, 7.83 and 7.63). In all cases, mean and variability in growth rates of C. brownii increased under OA scenarios, while growth rates for C. geminata declined under OA. This concurs with predictions that non-CCM species will be gaining benefits from additional CO2, while species with a CCM may gain less benefits from additional CO2, while at the same time demonstrating that DIC use alone does not predict responses to OA. We show divergent responses of two Caulerpa species that could have implications for their future abundance in Australasia.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Responses of Caulerpa with and without CO2 concentrating mechanisms to elevated ocean acidification (text & video)’

Ocean acidification at the Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC) (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Evelyn Ikelau Otto, Palau International Coral Reef Center (PICRC), Palau

Description:

This presentation will discuss some of the work that is going on at PICRC in regards to climate change, specifically Ocean Acidification. It will highlight the exciting work that has been conducted in Palau and at the Center as well as highlight some setbacks that were experienced as PICRC develops their OA and water quality monitoring programs.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

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Blue carbon restoration and ocean acidification in Fiji: a case study from Viti Levu Bay (text & video)

OA Week 2021, PI-TOA (Pacific Islands & Territories) Hub Session

Ms. Miriama Vuiyasawa, The University of the South Pacific, Fiji

Description:

Blue Carbon ecosystems such as mangrove forests and seagrass meadows have the ability to sequester carbon dioxide and store fixed carbon. As a result of this sequestration, there is less dissolved carbon dioxide available in the ocean water column to form acidic compounds. Therefore, restoring blue carbon habitats can help mitigate the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coastal communities. In 2018 the Institute of Applied Sciences at the University of the South Pacific was awarded a 2-year project to pilot the use of blue carbon in local mitigation of OA in Fiji. The main objective was to increase coastal resilience through climate change mitigation and better understanding of the role of blue carbon in OA mitigation through support of an existing coastal restoration project. The project was conducted in 4 villages in Viti Levu Bay, Fiji Islands and activities involved mangrove forest restoration, monitoring ocean acidification, raising awareness about observations of ecosystem health at the restored site. The work also provided capacity building for local scientists and early career junior staff on OA monitoring. Discrete water samples were collected at all four sites on a monthly basis and chemical analyses were conducted using protocols from the GOA-ON and an In a Box equipment kit donated by the Ocean Foundation. Data collected includes pH, total alkalinity, salinity and water temperate from which other OA parameters were determined. Along with OA monitoring, a total of 0.7925 ha of mangrove forest (more than (6000 seedlings) was planted with the assistance of the local Navuniivi community. Long term monitoring and more restorative work is needed at the project sites to fully understand and assess the benefits of the restorative efforts and its potential mitigation of OA. Several challenges were encountered, particularly with equipment breakdown and maintenance, and the limited resources to perform monitoring work. Despite these challenges, the project successfully collected OA monitoring data, which was the first dataset for the area and thus contributed to SDG 14 goal for Fiji. The mangrove restorative work was also a huge achievement with great community buy-in that resulted in a successful community collaborative project.

Ocean Acidification Week 2021 was sponsored by the following organizations:

(1) GOA-ON, the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network,

(2) NOAA, the United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration,

(3) IAEA OA-ICC, the International Atomic Energy Agency – Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre, and

(4) IOC-UNESCO – the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

For more information, please visit www.goa-on.org

Continue reading ‘Blue carbon restoration and ocean acidification in Fiji: a case study from Viti Levu Bay (text & video)’

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