Archive for the 'Art' Category

Save the corals

Performers swimming in the lighted water of Hirschengraben Indoor Swimming Pool in Bern during an artistic performance by Swiss visual artist Pipilotti Rist and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) to denounce the disappearance of corals due to warming and acidification of the ocean. Photo courtesy: AFP

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Exhibition features East German photos, oceanic sculptures

Photographs from 1974 East Berlin and sculptures of sea slugs sit side by side at the fall exhibits at the Kehler Liddell Gallery in Westville.

The first exhibit, entitled Taking Sides, features work by New Haven photographer Sven Martson who recently published a book with photographs of daily life in East Berlin before the fall of the Berlin wall. Sculptor Gar Waterman created the second exhibit, entitled Canaries in a Blue Coal Mine. His work aims to draw attention to the impact of ocean acidification on sea creatures through his sculptures of animals such as cephalopods, sea slugs and fish. Both exhibits will be on display until October 7.

“Sven is covering what humans are doing to each other and my show is more about what we are doing to the environment,” Waterman said at the show’s opening on Sunday . “Both of our shows show how we are interacting we each other in one case and also how we are interacting with the world and the creatures that are in it.”

Continue reading ‘Exhibition features East German photos, oceanic sculptures’

Saving the planet

Art is an ideal way to communicate climate imperatives in digestible chunks, Pam McKinlay says. Bruce Munro talks to the Dunedin artist and curator ahead of the family-focused art expo “Oku Moana”. 

Pam McKinlay is saving the planet, not one, but a dozen interactive art works at a time.

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“Carbonated Ocean” photos raise awareness for climate change’s lesser known evil twin

Striking conceptual photography is once again a major component of Christine Ren’s latest conservation campaign, called Carbonated Ocean

Last time we were in touch with performer, filmmaker, and underwater “artivist” Christine Ren, we had an insightful discussion about her (then) project about ghost fishing titled Silent Killers. Now, she’s back with a new website and another evocative project centered on marine conservation. This time, she zeroes in on climate change’s lesser known evil twin, ocean acidification.

Continue reading ‘“Carbonated Ocean” photos raise awareness for climate change’s lesser known evil twin’

A basic idea falls flat in ‘pH’

pHIt’s not exaggeration to call Nancy Lord an Alaska institution. The former state Poet Laurette, has built a multiple decade-spanning career of short stories, memoirs, academic work and activism highlighting her love for history, the natural world and Alaska. But she’s never made the jump into novels until now, with “pH.”

“pH” is one-half literary fiction and one-half issues book, with the issue in question being ocean acidification. If that sounds like it would be hard to build an interesting novel around … it is. And “pH” frankly fails.

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The Ocean Film Challenge

Filmmakers have the power to change the trajectory of human life on our water planet — from destruction to revitalization! Submit a short film for the Ocean Film Challenge, 7 minutes or under, on the impact humans have on the ocean and the actions individuals can take to save the ocean … and the humans who depend on it. Continue reading ‘The Ocean Film Challenge’

Enviro-doc exploring ocean acidification’s impact on deep-water corals gains unprecedented access; to premiere at Santa Barbara International Film Festival

Acid Horizon follows marine ecologist Dr. Erik Cordes on a harrowing deep-sea expedition to track down the “supercoral,” a strain of the deep-water coral Lophelia pertusa that seems to possess the unique genetic capability to thrive in a low-pH ocean. The film will make its World Premiere at the 2018 Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

The film’s protagonist Dr. Cordes, Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Biology at Temple University, explains: “Our research has shown that some coral colonies – the “Supercorals” – do better than the rest when challenged by ocean acidification. This film delivers that message through an intimate story and an epic adventure. It is essential that this story is told so that people are aware of this hidden threat, but also understand that there is hope and still time to take action.”

Continue reading ‘Enviro-doc exploring ocean acidification’s impact on deep-water corals gains unprecedented access; to premiere at Santa Barbara International Film Festival’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book