Posts Tagged 'temperature'



Species interactions can shift the response of a maerl bed community to ocean acidification and warming

Predicted ocean acidification and warming are likely to have major implications for marine organisms, especially marine calcifiers. However, little information is available on the response of marine communities as a whole to predicted changes. Here, we experimentally examined the combined effects of temperature and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) increases on the response of maerl bed assemblages, composed of living and dead thalli of the free-living coralline alga Lithothamnion corallioides, epiphytic fleshy algae, and grazer species. Two three-month experiments were performed in the winter and summer seasons in mesocosms with four different combinations of pCO2 (ambient and high pCO2) and temperature (ambient and +3 °C). The response of maerl assemblages was assessed using metabolic measurements at the species and assemblage scales. Gross primary production and respiration of assemblages were enhanced by high pCO2 conditions in the summer. This positive effect was attributed to the increase in epiphyte biomass, which benefited from higher CO2 concentrations for growth and primary production. Conversely, high pCO2 drastically decreased the calcification rates in assemblages. This response can be attributed to the decline in calcification rates of living L. corallioides due to acidification as well as increased dissolution of dead L. corallioides. Future changes in pCO2 and temperature are likely to promote the development of non-calcifying algae to the detriment of the engineer species L. corallioides. The development of fleshy algae may be modulated by the ability of grazers to regulate epiphyte growth. However, our results suggest that predicted changes will negatively affect the metabolism of grazers and potentially their ability to control epiphyte abundance. Here, we demonstrate that the response of marine communities to climate change will depend on the direct effects on species physiology and the indirect effects due to shifts in species interactions. This double, interdependent response underlines the importance of examining community-level processes, which integrate species interactions, to better understand the impact of global change on marine ecosystems.

Continue reading ‘Species interactions can shift the response of a maerl bed community to ocean acidification and warming’

Coral calcifying fluid aragonite saturation states derived from Raman spectroscopy

Quantifying the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr) within the calcifying fluid of corals is critical for understanding their biomineralisation process and sensitivity to environmental changes including ocean acidification. Recent advances in microscopy, microprobes, and isotope geochemistry allow determination of calcifying fluid pH and [CO32−], but direct quantification of ΩAr (where ΩAr =[CO32−][Ca2+]/Ksp) has proved elusive. Here we test a new technique for deriving ΩAr based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we analysed abiogenic aragonite crystals precipitated under a range of ΩAr from 10 to 34, and found a strong dependence of Raman peak width on ΩAr that was independent of other factors including pH, Mg/Ca partitioning, and temperature. Validation of our Raman technique for corals is difficult because there are presently no direct measurements of calcifying fluid ΩAr available for comparison. However, Raman analysis of the international coral standard JCp-1 produced ΩAr of 12.3 ± 0.3, which we demonstrate is consistent with published skeletal Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, B/Ca, δ44Ca, and δ11B data. Raman measurements are rapid (≤ 1 s), high-resolution (< 1 μm), precise (derived ΩAr ±1 to 2), and require minimal sample preparation; making the technique well suited for testing the sensitivity of coral calcifying fluid ΩAr to ocean acidification and warming using samples from natural and laboratory settings. To demonstrate this, we also show a high-resolution time series of ΩAr over multiple years of growth in a Porites skeleton from the Great Barrier Reef, and we evaluate the response of ΩAr in juvenile Acropora cultured under elevated CO2 and temperature.

Continue reading ‘Coral calcifying fluid aragonite saturation states derived from Raman spectroscopy’

Decreased pH and increased temperatures affect young-of-the-year red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus)

The red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) is a high-latitude commercially important species with a complex life-history cycle which encompasses a wide variety of conditions and habitats. High-latitude waters, including those around Alaska where red king crab live, are predicted to have increased ocean acidification and temperatures in comparison to other areas. The interaction of ocean acidification and increased temperature has not been examined for any life history stage of red king crab. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on young-of-the-year red king crab survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (∼7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 °C, and ambient +4 °C, for a total of six treatments. Mortality increased with exposure to reduced pH and higher temperatures, but a clear trend in the interactive effects of the stressors was not observed. A synergetic effect on mortality was observed in the pH 7.8 and ambient +4 °C temperature treatment. This treatment also had the lowest survival with only 3% surviving to the end of the experiment. However, an antagonistic effect on mortality was observed in the pH 7.8 and ambient +2 °C treatment. Lower pH and warmer temperatures affected intermoult duration, only temperature affected percent increase in size, but carapace length was not affected. Decreased pH and increased temperature had no effect on morphology. The results of this study combined with other studies show that decreased pH and warming has profound negative effects on red king crab. Unless the species is able to adapt or acclimate to changing climate conditions, red king crabs populations may decrease in the upcoming decades due to ocean acidification and rising temperatures.

Continue reading ‘Decreased pH and increased temperatures affect young-of-the-year red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus)’

Elevated carbon dioxide and temperature affects otolith development, but not chemistry, in a diadromous fish

Ocean acidification threatens marine ecosystems by altering ocean chemistry and calcification processes in marine organisms. This study investigated the effects of predicted future CO2 levels, under varying temperature levels, on otolith development (size and shape) and chemistry, with the latter aimed at developing a chemical tracer of environmental pCO2. Juvenile barramundi (Lates calcarifer), a diadromous fish species, were reared in ambient (pCO2: 640 μatm; pH: 7.9) and elevated (pCO2: 1490 μatm; pH: 7.5) pCO2 treatments representing current and projected coastal systems crossed with three temperature levels (26 °C, 30 °C and 34 °C) for 42 days. Otolith shape and size parameters (length, width, perimeter and area) were measured and element concentrations (Na, Mg, Sr, Ba, Li, Mn and B) were quantified using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA ICP-MS). There was an interactive effect of elevated pCO2 and temperature on otolith shape and perimeter, whereas otolith chemistry did not vary among treatments. This study demonstrates that combined elevated pCO2 and temperature can affect the development of important internal structures in diadromous fish, but also suggests that otolith elemental chemistry was not a suitable tracer for pCO2 histories in fish. Future climate change conditions affect an important auditory and balance organ; consequently, rising CO2 levels may interfere with sensory function.

Continue reading ‘Elevated carbon dioxide and temperature affects otolith development, but not chemistry, in a diadromous fish’

Combined effects of elevated pCO2 and warming facilitate Cyanophage infections

Elevated pCO2 and warming are generally expected to influence cyanobacterial growth, and may promote the formation of blooms. Yet, both climate change factors may also influence cyanobacterial mortality by favoring pathogens, such as viruses, which will depend on the ability of the host to adapt. To test this hypothesis, we grew Plectonema boryanum IU597 under two temperature (25 and 29°C) and two pCO2 (400 and 800 μatm) conditions for 1 year, after which all treatments were re-exposed to control conditions for a period of 3 weeks. At several time points during the 1 year period, and upon re-exposure, we measured various infection characteristics of it associated cyanophage PP, including the burst size, latent period, lytic cycle and the efficiency of plaquing (EOP). As expected, elevated pCO2 promoted growth of P. boryanumequally over the 1 year period, but warming did not. Burst size increased in the warm treatment, but decreased in both the elevated pCO2 and combined treatment. The latent period and lytic cycle both became shorter in the elevated pCO2 and higher temperature treatment, and were further reduced by the combined effect of both factors. Efficiency of plaquing (EOP) decreased in the elevated pCO2 treatment, increased in the warm treatment, and increased even stronger in the combined treatment. These findings indicate that elevated pCO2 enhanced the effect of warming, thereby further promoting the virus infection rate. The re-exposure experiments demonstrate adaptation of the host leading to higher biomass build-up with elevated pCO2 over the experimental period, and lower performance upon re-exposure to control conditions. Similarly, virus burst size and EOP increased when given warm adapted host, but were lower as compared to the control when the host was re-exposed to control conditions. Our results demonstrate that adaptation but particularly physiological acclimation to climate change conditions favored viral infections, while limited host plasticity and slow adaptation after re-exposure to control conditions impeded host biomass build-up and viral infections.

Continue reading ‘Combined effects of elevated pCO2 and warming facilitate Cyanophage infections’

Effects of temperature and pCO2 on population regulation of Symbiodinium spp. in a tropical reef coral

This study tested the bleaching response of the Pacific coral Seriatopora caliendrumto short-term exposure to high temperature and elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). Juvenile colonies collected from Nanwan Bay, Taiwan, were used in a factorial experimental design in which 2 temperatures (∼27.6 °C and ∼30.4 °C) and 2 pCO2 values (∼47.2 Pa and ∼90.7 Pa) were crossed to evaluate, over 12 days, the effects on the densities and physiology of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) in the corals. Thermal bleaching, as defined by a reduction of Symbiodinium densities at high temperature, was unaffected by high pCO2. The division, or mitotic index (MI), of Symbiodinium remaining in thermally bleached corals was about 35% lower than in control colonies, but they contained about 53% more chlorophyll. Bleaching was highly variable among colonies, but the differences were unrelated to MI or pigment content of Symbiodinium remaining in the coral host. At the end of the study, all of the corals contained clade C Symbiodinium (either C1d or C15), and the genetic variation of symbionts did not account for among-colony bleaching differences. These results showed that high temperature causes coral bleaching independent of pCO2, and underscores the potential role of the coral host in driving intraspecific variation in coral bleaching.

Continue reading ‘Effects of temperature and pCO2 on population regulation of Symbiodinium spp. in a tropical reef coral’

Physiological and histopathological impacts of increased carbon dioxide and temperature on the scallops Argopecten purpuratus cultured under upwelling influences in northern Chile

In addition to the increase in temperature occurring in the world’s oceans, new evidences suggest a tendency for an increase in upwelling-favorable winds, bringing to surface cold and high pCO2 corrosive waters. Changing temperature and pCO2 conditions may have significant implications for the shellfish farming socio-ecological system. In order, to setup the basis for understand the impact of both environmental variables, in this study, we investigated the combined effects of changing temperature and pCO2 on the physiological rates and histopathology of scallops Argopecten purpuratus farmed in Tongoy Bay, an area permanently influenced by coastal upwelling. Juvenile scallops were reared at two pCO2 levels (400 and 1000 μatm) and two temperatures (14 and 18 °C). After 18 d of experimental exposure, growth, metabolic and clearance rates increased significantly at high temperature but independent of pCO2 level, indicating a positive effect of warming on the physiological processes associated with energy acquisition. However, ingestion rates of scallops showed a synergistic interactive effect when exposed to both stressors. Increased pCO2 also impacts the health of A. purpuratus through atrophy in the digestive gland. These results suggest that, the presence of trade-offs in energy allocation during upwelling-induced stress (low temperature and high pCO2) can impact growth, metabolism, ingestion rates and health status of scallops cultured in Tongoy Bay. But, less severe response to high pCO2 levels, suggest that natural variability in upwelling areas may promote acclimation and adaptation potential in this farmed scallops.

Continue reading ‘Physiological and histopathological impacts of increased carbon dioxide and temperature on the scallops Argopecten purpuratus cultured under upwelling influences in northern Chile’


Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,013,309 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book