Posts Tagged 'temperature'



Effects of the interaction of ocean acidification, solar radiation, and warming on biogenic dimethylated sulfur compounds cycling in the Changjiang River Estuary

Ocean acidification (OA) affects marine primary productivity and community structure, and therefore may influence the biogeochemical cycles of volatile biogenic dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and photochemical oxidation product dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A 23-day incubation experiment on board was conducted to investigate the short-term response of biogenic sulfur compounds production and cycling to OA in the Changjiang River Estuary and further understand its effects on biogenic sulfur compounds. Result showed that phytoplankton abundance and species presented remarkable differences under three different pH levels in the late stage of the experiment. A significant reduction in chlorophyll a (Chl-a), DMS, particulate DMSP (DMSPp), and dissolved DMSO (DMSOd) concentrations was identified under high CO2 levels. Moreover, minimal change was observed in the production of dissolved DMSP (DMSPd) and particulate DMSO (DMSOp) among treatments. The ratios of DMS, total DMSP (DMSPt), and total DMSO (DMSOt) to Chl-a were also not affected by a change in pH. In addition, DMS and DMSOd were highly related to mean bacterial abundance under three pH levels. Additional incubation experiments on light and temperature showed that the influence of pH on productions of dimethylated sulfur compounds also depended on solar radiation and temperature conditions. DMS photodegradation rate increased with decreasing pH under full-spectrum natural light and UVB light. Thus, OA may lead to decreasing DMS concentrations in the surface seawater. Light and temperature conditions also play an important role in the production and cycling of biogenic sulfur compounds.

Continue reading ‘Effects of the interaction of ocean acidification, solar radiation, and warming on biogenic dimethylated sulfur compounds cycling in the Changjiang River Estuary’

Sensory qualities of oysters unaltered by a short exposure to combined elevated pCO2 and temperature

Reliance on the marine environment for the provision of food is ever-increasing, but future climate change threatens production. Despite this concern, the impact on seafood quality and success of the seafood industry is unknown. Using a short-term study, we test these concerns using a major aquaculture species—Crassostrea gigas—exposing them to three acidification and warming scenarios: (1) ambient pCO2 (~400 ppm) & control temperature (15°C), (2) ambient pCO2 (~400 ppm) & elevated temperature (20°C), (3) elevated pCO2 (~1,000 ppm) & elevated temperature (20°C). Oyster quality was assessed by scoring appearance, aroma, taste, and overall acceptability. A panel of five experts was asked to score nine oysters—three from each treatment—according to agreed criteria. Results indicate that these levels of acidification and warming did not significantly alter the sensory properties of C. gigas, and notably the overall acceptability remained unchanged. Non-statistically supported trends suggest that several sensory attributes—opacity, mouthfeel, aspect of meat, shininess, meat resistance, meat texture, and creaminess—may improve under acidification and warming scenarios. These findings can be considered positive for the future of the aquaculture and food sectors. Crassostrea gigas therefore is expected to remain a key species for food security that is resilient to climate change, whilst retaining its valuable attributes.

Continue reading ‘Sensory qualities of oysters unaltered by a short exposure to combined elevated pCO2 and temperature’

Effects of increased CO2 and temperature on the growth and photosynthesis in the marine macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis from the coastal waters of South China

The marine red macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) is one of the most important species for seaweed cultivation along the coastal waters of South China. In this study, G. lemaneiformis was incubated under present-day (390 ppm) or predicted-year CO2 levels (700 ppm), and under normal (20 °C) versus elevated temperatures (24 °C), to investigate possible effects of climate change conditions on the growth and photosynthesis. The chlorophyll a (Chl a), carotenoid (Car), and phycobiliprotein (PB) contents responded significantly to increased temperature under normal CO2 and high CO2 concentrations. However, CO2 enrichment in the culture had no significant impact on Chl a and Car but decreased the PB contents in G. lemaneiformis. The growth rates of G. lemaneiformis were significantly improved by increasing temperature, especially under concurrent increasing CO2 levels. Additionally, short-term exposure to high temperature stimulated the irradiance-saturated maximum photosynthetic rate (Pmax), and this stimulation was preserved with exposure to the high temperature in long-term incubations, with such stimulation being much more pronounced under normal CO2 concentrations than high CO2 concentrations. Results suggest that increased temperature exerted more pronounced effects on the growth and photosynthesis of G. lemaneiformis than increased CO2 concentrations did. We proposed that the sea cultivation of G. lemaneiformis would benefit from the ongoing climate change (increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and sea surface temperatures) through enhanced growth and carbon sequestration.

Continue reading ‘Effects of increased CO2 and temperature on the growth and photosynthesis in the marine macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis from the coastal waters of South China’

Impact of climate change variables on nutrient cycling by marine microorganisms in the Southern California Bight and Ross Sea, Antarctica

Ocean environments are being impacted by climate warming, elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, and shifting nutrient sources and sinks. It is essential to quantify the sensitivity of microorganisms to these effects of global change because they form the base of the marine food web and are an integral component of nutrient cycling on the planet. Their role in photosynthesis, nutrient uptake, and transfer of organic matter into higher trophic levels or to the deep ocean via the biological pump render microorganisms key in ecosystem structure and function and in regulating the global climate. The goal of this dissertation research was to determine how changing environmental conditions impact microbial communities and the rates at which they take up nutrients. Research for this dissertation took place in the Southern California Bight and in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, where fully factorial designs were used to investigate the response of microorganisms to multiple global change parameters. Nutrient uptake rates were measured using 13C and 15N stable isotopes for carbon and nitrogen substrates and 33P radioisotopes for phosphorus substrates. In the Southern California Bight, a microbial assemblage was collected and incubated in an ‘ecostat’ continuous culture system, where elevated temperature, CO2, and the dominant nitrogen substrate (nitrate or urea) in the diluent were manipulated. During this experiment uptake rates of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), nitrate (NO3-), and urea were determined for two microbial size classes (0.7-5.0 μm and >5.0 μm). Urea uptake rates were greater than NO3-, and uptake rates of urea and DIC for both size fractions increased at elevated temperature, while uptake rates of NO3- by smaller microorganisms increased when CO2 levels were high. In the Ross Sea, the impact of elevated temperature, CO2, and iron addition on DIC and NO3- uptake rates by two size classes (0.7-5.0 μm and >5.0 μm ) of a late-season microbial community were investigated using a semi-continuous and continuous ‘ecostat’ culturing approach. Temperature impacted the microbial community the most, significantly increasing NO3- and DIC uptake rates by larger microorganisms. The effects of iron addition were more apparent when temperature was also elevated, and CO2 did not impact rates. Bioassay experiments were also conducted in the Ross Sea to determine how increasing and decreasing the N:P supply ratio in combination with other parameters (temperature and iron) impact uptake rates of DIC, NO3-, and amino acids. Results from these experiments show that changes to the dissolved N:P supply ratio have the potential to alter nutrient uptake rates over short time scales, but that temperature elevation and iron addition have a larger impact. Additional experiments were completed on diatoms (Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia subcurvata) and Phaeocystis antarctica, three important phytoplankton species collected from the Ross Sea, to assess how temperature elevation and iron addition impact uptake rates of a number of inorganic and organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus substrates. These culture studies generally show that when temperature is increased, diatoms are able to take up nutrients more rapidly than Phaeocystis antarctica.
Results from this dissertation show that nutrient cycles and phytoplankton communities in the Southern California Bight and the Ross Sea, Antarctica will likely be different in the future. Although all variables tested were found to exert some influence on microbial nutrient cycling, temperature elevation generally had the largest effect, increasing biomass and uptake rates, structuring the composition of the microbial community, and altering stoichiometry. This research did not include top down effects and it is limited spatially and temporally, however, it demonstrates the importance of studying different nutrient substrates and looking at multiple interactive stressors to gain a more comprehensive view of potential change.

Continue reading ‘Impact of climate change variables on nutrient cycling by marine microorganisms in the Southern California Bight and Ross Sea, Antarctica’

Relationships between temperature, pH, and crusting on Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory-grown Neogloboquadrina foraminifera

Mg/Ca ratio paleothermometry in foraminifera is an important tool for the reconstruction and interpretation of past environments. However, existing Mg/Ca:temperature relationships for planktic species inhabiting mid- and high- latitude environments are limited by a lack of information about the development and impact of low-Mg/Ca ratio “crusts” and the influence of the carbonate system on Mg/Ca ratios in these groups. To address this, we cultured individual specimens of Neogloboquadrina incompta and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in seawater across a range of temperature (6 °- 12 °C) and pH (7.4 – 8.2). We found by laser ablation inductively couple mass spectrometry analyses of shells that culture-grown crust calcite in N. incompta had a lower Mg/Ca ratio than ontogenetic calcite formed at the same temperature, suggesting that temperature is not responsible for the low Mg/Ca ratio of neogloboquadrinid crusts. The Mg/Ca:temperature relationship for ontogenetic calcite in N. incompta was consistent with the previously published culture-based relationship and no significant relationship was found between Mg/Ca ratios and pH in this species. However, the Mg/Ca ratio in laboratory cultured N. pachyderma was much higher than that reported in previous core-top and sediment trap samples, due to lack of crust formation in culture. Application of our ontogenetic calcite-specific Mg/Ca:temperature relationships to fossil N. pachyderma and N. incompta from five intervals in cores from the Santa Barbara Basin and the Bering Sea show that excluding crust calcite in fossil specimens may improve Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates.

Continue reading ‘Relationships between temperature, pH, and crusting on Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory-grown Neogloboquadrina foraminifera’

Ocean warming and acidification alter Antarctic macroalgal biochemical composition but not amphipod grazer feeding preferences

Increased anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 concentrations have resulted in ocean warming and alterations in ocean carbonate chemistry, decreasing seawater pH (ocean acidification). The combination of ocean warming and acidification (OWA) may alter trophic interactions in marine benthic communities along the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). Abundant and diverse macroalgae–grazer assemblages, dominated by macroalgae (e.g. chemically defended Desmarestia anceps and D. menziesii) and gammarid amphipods (e.g. Gondogeneia antarctica), occur on the nearshore benthos along the WAP. In the present study, the amphipod G. antarctica and macroalgae D. anceps and D. menziesii were exposed for 39 and 79 d, respectively, to combinations of current and predicted near-future temperature (1.5 and 3.5°C, respectively) and pH (8.0 and 7.6, respectively). Protein and lipid levels of macroalgal tissues were quantified, and 5-way choice amphipod feeding assays were performed with lyophilized macroalgal tissues collected at time zero and following exposure to the 4 temperature-pH treatments. For D. anceps, we found a significant interactive temperature-pH effect on lipid levels and significantly lower protein levels at reduced pH. In contrast, tissues of D. menziesii exhibited significantly greater lipid levels after exposure to reduced pH, but there was no temperature effect on lipid or protein levels. Despite shifts in macroalgal biochemical composition, there were no changes in amphipod feeding preferences. Our results indicate that despite altered macroalgal nutritional quality under OWA, both macroalgae retained their ability to deter amphipod feeding. This deterrent capacity could become an important contributor to net community resistance of macroalgae-mesograzer assemblages of the WAP to predicted OWA.

Continue reading ‘Ocean warming and acidification alter Antarctic macroalgal biochemical composition but not amphipod grazer feeding preferences’

The microbiome of the octocoral Lobophytum pauciflorum: minor differences between sexes and resilience to short-term stress

Bacteria associated with marine invertebrates are thought to have a range of important roles that benefit the host including production of compounds that may exclude pathogenic microorganisms and recycling of essential nutrients. This study characterised the microbiome of a gonochoric octocoral, Lobophytum pauciflorum, and investigated whether either sex or environmental stresses influenced the diversity of the associated microbiome through amplicon profiling of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Sequences affiliated to Spirochaetaceae and Endozoicimonaceae dominated the microbiome of L. pauciflorum, representing 43% and 21% of the community, respectively. Among the dominant class affiliations, no sex-specific differences were detected, though unassigned sequences were at a 2-fold higher relative abundance in samples from female individuals than from males. These potentially novel sequences contributed to observed differences between sexes as detected by a multivariate analysis at the OTU level. Exposing L. pauciflorum fragments to increased temperature (31°C), decreased pH (7.9) or both stressors simultaneously for 12 days did not significantly alter the microbial community, indicating that the soft coral microbiome is relatively resilient to short-term environmental stress.

Continue reading ‘The microbiome of the octocoral Lobophytum pauciflorum: minor differences between sexes and resilience to short-term stress’


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Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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