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Happy New Year!

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Ocean acidification news stream gets new features

Dear Users,  

The OA-ICC has supported the ocean acidification community by maintaining the ocean acidification news stream and OA-ICC bibliographic database for nearly 10 years. This year in light of the increased importance of the virtual space in the time of COVID-19, we dedicated additional resources to update and grow our site, enhancing the tools available to our community. In addition to updating the Bibliographic Database, which now contains more than 8,800 scientific papers on ocean acidification, we have developed new guides and features on the site which you may be interested in.

These include: 

  • A calendar with descriptions and links to events on OA, which you may sync with your google calendar. This calendar is updated regularly, and we welcome submissions of events.
  • A resource library, which contains a vast selection of topics on OA, for example: educational materials, projects and programs, general articles, reports and newsletters, and organizations. More resources and categories will be added continuously and we welcome resource submissions.
  • An enhanced basic search and new advanced search option, which will help you explore our archives and resource library.
  • A summary of our methods for maintaining this news stream, as well as detailed documentation of our procedures. 
  • A page providing quick links and information about our bibliographic database and data portal.   

We invite you to explore the site and benefit from the additional resources made available to the ocean acidification community. If you are interested in collaborating with the OA-ICC projects, programs and events, please contact us at oa-icc@iaea.org

Kind regards,  

OA-ICC team 

OA-ICC bibliographic database updates and user guide

We are happy to inform you that the latest version of the OA-ICC bibliographic database, now containing more than 8,800 scientific articles, books and more on ocean acidification, is available for public use on Zotero and for download on pCloud. The database is no longer available on Mendeley because the public groups feature has been discontinued, but you may still download the database and add it to your Mendeley library.

We have also created a new user guide and a page on our methodology to improve your experience using the bibliographic resources. You may find our user guide and more information on OA-ICC bibliographic resources, including the biological response data portal, on our new bibliographic database page. This page includes our updated friendly user’s guide, featuring explanations to our custom keywords with links to clear examples. In addition, we will be sharing a tutorial on navigating the bibliographic resources soon.

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CO2-in-seawater reference materials community survey

Dear GOA-ON member,

The U.S. Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification is engaging in efforts to increase the resilience of the production and distribution of reference materials for the quality control of measurements of seawater CO2 system parameters. Currently, there is a single source of reference materials for total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and pH in seawater and a calibrated HCl titrant for seawater alkalinity analysis (A. Dickson Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego).

We are reaching out today to encourage your participation in a community survey about your use of CO2-in-seawater reference materials. Use this link to access the survey: 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdNiIIARiKAxSyorp_IWYY5vOeLi7bMNRAmSx68XvyGmcCCLw/viewform?usp=sf_link

This survey is part of a larger effort, the first being a webinar by Andrew Dickson entitled, “CO2-in-seawater reference materials: yesterday, today, and tomorrow”. You can view a recording of that webinar here, with questions, conversation, and a pdf of the slides available here.

Data from this survey will be used to gain a baseline understanding of how reference materials for the quality control of measurements of seawater CO2 system parameters are used and how to build resilience in their production and distribution. Individual responses to this survey are confidential. Data from this survey linked to respondents’ identities will never be released publicly. Rather, data for public release will be presented in aggregated forms. 

This survey will take 5-10 minutes to fill-out. While the survey will not close on a specific date, we request that you complete it by May 21, 2021. 

Sincerely,
Michael Acquafredda, United States National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Shallin Busch, NOAA

Libby Jewett, NOAA

Andrew Dickson, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

Hedy Edmonds, United States National Science Foundation

Privacy statement:
Individual responses to this survey are confidential. Data from this survey linked to respondents’ identities will never be released publicly. Rather, data for public release will be presented in aggregated forms.

Timeline:
While the survey will not close on a specific date, we request that you complete it by May 21, 2021.

Rationale:
Reference materials are fundamental for accurate and precise measurements of seawater CO2 system parameters and research related to ocean acidification and oceanic carbon cycles. Currently, there is a single source of reference materials for total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and pH in seawater and a calibrated HCl titrant for seawater alkalinity analysis (A. Dickson Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego). The U.S. Interagency Working Group on Ocean Acidification is engaging in efforts to increase the resilience of the production and distribution of reference materials for the quality control of measurements of seawater CO2 system parameters. This survey is the second community engagement in this larger effort, the first being a webinar by Andrew Dickson entitled, “CO2-in-seawater reference materials: yesterday, today, and tomorrow” which can be viewed using Link #1 (below). A pdf of the slides and a conversation thread resulting from the webinar are available by accessing Link #2 (below).

Link #1 – “CO2-in-seawater reference materials: yesterday, today, and tomorrow” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eajzkNxei6w

Link #2 – Questions, conversations, and a pdf of the Dr. Dickson’s webinar slides
https://www.oainfoexchange.org/members/updates/50051

Continue reading ‘CO2-in-seawater reference materials community survey’

One million!

The Ocean Acidification News Stream just passed the 1,000,000 hits mark!

We thank all readers for their interest.

OA-ICC December calendar: 12/12- “To read this weekend: OA page-turners”

Count down the days until 2015 together with the OA-ICC! Each day of December you will find a short story on the OA-ICC news stream highlighting an ocean acidification project, effort, or resource.

Discover today’s story below: “To read this weekend: OA page-turners”

Continue reading ‘OA-ICC December calendar: 12/12- “To read this weekend: OA page-turners”’

Ocean acidification blog: 2012 in review

Dear Blog Addicts,

Lina Hansson and I wish all the best for 2013 to all readers of the EPOCA blog! We thank you all for your interest. Even though EPOCA came to an end in June 2012, we have been able to maintain this blog, partly thanks to support from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The blog will soon be transferred to the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre and operated from IAEA. We hope that the transition will be smooth; stay tuned for more information.

Here are a few numbers:

  • 4584 posts have been published since 2006 (about 1198 in 2012)
  • 653 subscribers through RSS or email (up from 570 in 2011)
  • 376 Twitter followers (up from 270 in 2011)
  • an unknown number of FaceBook friends

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog: click here to see the complete report.

I remind you below the content of the “About” page and, also, that comments are always welcome. Just type your comment in the box located below each article. Note that comments are moderated.

Jean-Pierre Gattuso
EPOCA Scientific Coordinator (until June 2012)

———————————————
Jean-Pierre Gattuso | http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/~gattuso

This blog was started in July 2006 as a “one man” effort. It is a product of EPOCA, the European Project on Ocean Acidification since May 2008 and it is sponsored by the IMBER and SOLAS projects since January 2010. Its only ambition is to centralize information available on ocean acidification and its consequences on marine organisms and ecosystems. By no means it is meant to be comprehensive but we are trying to provide an unbiased view of the literature and media articles. The owner of this blog, the European Commission and the sponsoring organizations do not endorse the information published.

This blog is coordinated by:

Jean-Pierre Gattuso, CNRS Senior Research Scientist
CNRS-Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, France
Email: gattuso at obs-vlfr.fr
Web site

Contributors are:

  • Jean-Pierre Gattuso, EPOCA coordinator (gattuso at obs-vlfr.fr)
  • Lina Hansson, EPOCA Project Manager (hansson at obs-vlfr.fr)
  • Anne-Marin Nisumaa (Until May 2012), EPOCA Information Technology Manager (nisumaa at obs-vlfr.fr)

Ocean Acidification Presentation and Roundtable Discussion – Jan. 9, 2012

Acclaimed University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Jeremy Mathis will be in Dillingham on January 9th, 2012.  He will be presenting his research findings on ocean acidification and moderators will lead a discussion with the community on what the changing oceans mean for a fishing community such as Dillingham.

Continue reading ‘Ocean Acidification Presentation and Roundtable Discussion – Jan. 9, 2012’

Ocean acidification cartoon

SOLAS-IMBER Ocean Acidification working group just launched

SOLAS and IMBER have launched, in September 2009, a working group on Ocean Acidification. It is sub-group 3 of the IMBER/SOLAS Carbon Research Working Group (SIC!).

The tasks of this group are:

  1. Coordinate international research efforts in ocean acidification
  2. Undertake synthesis activities in ocean acidification at the international level

Continue reading ‘SOLAS-IMBER Ocean Acidification working group just launched’

Global warming tactic cools climate but won’t help corals, say Stanford researchers

“Geoengineering” experiments proposed to reduce global warming by blocking sunlight with atmosphere-injected particles may cool the world but still leave carbon dioxide levels dangerously high, Stanford scientists say.

Sunlight-blocking particles would fail to solve the problems of ocean acidification and dying corals, two significant repercussions of climate change, according to a study by Ken Caldeira of Stanford University and the Carnegie Institution, Damon Matthews of Concordia University, and Long Cao of the Carnegie Institution. Atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in ocean water, making it more acidic and difficult for animals to build their shells or skeletons, especially corals.
Continue reading ‘Global warming tactic cools climate but won’t help corals, say Stanford researchers’

Call for input on the OCB response to EPA’s Notice of Data Availability (NODA) on ocean acidification

If you are interested in commenting on the first draft, then please download the document (here) particularly focussing on points 4-6 and returning to Heather Benway by 7th June 2009.

More information on Solas web site.

Documents about the latest knowledge on Ocean Acidification

IOC, SCOR, IGBP and IAEA have recently produced a number of documents about the latest knowledge on Ocean Acidification and priorities for future research, as a result of the Second Symposium on the Ocean in a High-CO2 World in October 2008. The publications are all available on the following website and involve a large number of international experts.
Continue reading ‘Documents about the latest knowledge on Ocean Acidification’

OCB Ocean Acidification Subcommittee coordinates input to EPA Federal register notice on ocean acidification

The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program Ocean Acidification Subcommittee is currently discussing how to coordinate and provide input to the recent EPA federal register notice on ocean acidification. If you would like to be involved, please contact OCB Ocean Acidification Subcommittee co-chairs Joan Kleypas (kleypas@ucar.edu) and Richard Feely (richard.a.feely@noaa.gov).

Continue reading ‘OCB Ocean Acidification Subcommittee coordinates input to EPA Federal register notice on ocean acidification’

Federal Register notice: Ocean acidification and marine pH water quality criteria

Environmental Protection Agency

DOCUMENT ACTION: Notice of data availability (NODA).

DOCUMENT SUMMARY:

This NODA provides interested parties with information submitted to EPA on ocean acidification and solicits additional pertinent data or information that may be useful in addressing this issue. In addition, EPA is notifying the public of its intent to review the current aquatic life criterion for marine pH to determine if a revision is warranted to protect the marine designated uses of States and Territories pursuant to Section 304(a)(1) of the Clean Water Act. The NODA also solicits additional scientific information and data, as well as ideas for effective strategies for Federal, State, and local officials to address the impacts of ocean acidification. This information can then be used as the basis for a broader discussion of ocean acidification and marine impacts. EPA also requests information pertaining to monitoring marine pH and implementation of pH water quality standards.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before June 15, 2009.

Continue reading ‘Federal Register notice: Ocean acidification and marine pH water quality criteria’

EPOCA and the fashion industry

Following its success in the field of science, the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA) has expanded its activities to also include the fashion industry. It has opened its first retail shop in Shanghai (photograph above, courtesy of Markus Weinbauer). All profits generated by the first 6 months of operation will be distributed in cash to the participants of the EPOCA annual meeting which will be held in Plymouth, UK, from 30 June to 2 July. At the meeting, the project Scientific Steering Committee, advised by the International Scientific Advisory Panel, will decide on future shop openings.

The other CO2 problem movie


Clay animation about the potentially disastrous rise in ocean acidity. Created by pupils from Ridgeway School Plymouth, Sundog Media, and Dr Carol Turley of Plymouth Marine Laboratory. Commissioned by EPOCA [European Project on OCean Acidification]; supported by UCP Marjon, and National Marine Aquarium.
Continue reading ‘The other CO2 problem movie’

The Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act

The Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act passed in the House of Representatives and Senate respectively on 3rd and 19th March 2009.
Continue reading ‘The Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act’

L’acidification des oceans, c’est pas du vent (in french)


Interview with Jean-Pierre Gattuso on ocean acidification.

rfi, L’acidification des oceans, c’est pas du vent, 9 February 2009.

The Monaco Declaration and research priorities report released 30 January at ASLO

More than 150 scientists from 26 countries are calling for immediate action by policymakers to reduce CO2 emissions sharply to avoid possible widespread and severe damage to marine ecosystems from ocean acidification. This warning comes in The Monaco Declaration and the Research Priorities Report developed at the 2nd international symposium on The Ocean in a High-CO2 World, to be released during a press conference on Friday, 30 January, at the ASLO Aquatic Sciences Conference in Nice.

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