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Federal Register notice: Ocean acidification and marine pH water quality criteria

Environmental Protection Agency

DOCUMENT ACTION: Notice of data availability (NODA).

DOCUMENT SUMMARY:

This NODA provides interested parties with information submitted to EPA on ocean acidification and solicits additional pertinent data or information that may be useful in addressing this issue. In addition, EPA is notifying the public of its intent to review the current aquatic life criterion for marine pH to determine if a revision is warranted to protect the marine designated uses of States and Territories pursuant to Section 304(a)(1) of the Clean Water Act. The NODA also solicits additional scientific information and data, as well as ideas for effective strategies for Federal, State, and local officials to address the impacts of ocean acidification. This information can then be used as the basis for a broader discussion of ocean acidification and marine impacts. EPA also requests information pertaining to monitoring marine pH and implementation of pH water quality standards.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before June 15, 2009.

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EPOCA and the fashion industry

Following its success in the field of science, the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA) has expanded its activities to also include the fashion industry. It has opened its first retail shop in Shanghai (photograph above, courtesy of Markus Weinbauer). All profits generated by the first 6 months of operation will be distributed in cash to the participants of the EPOCA annual meeting which will be held in Plymouth, UK, from 30 June to 2 July. At the meeting, the project Scientific Steering Committee, advised by the International Scientific Advisory Panel, will decide on future shop openings.

The other CO2 problem movie


Clay animation about the potentially disastrous rise in ocean acidity. Created by pupils from Ridgeway School Plymouth, Sundog Media, and Dr Carol Turley of Plymouth Marine Laboratory. Commissioned by EPOCA [European Project on OCean Acidification]; supported by UCP Marjon, and National Marine Aquarium.
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The Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act

The Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring (FOARAM) Act passed in the House of Representatives and Senate respectively on 3rd and 19th March 2009.
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L’acidification des oceans, c’est pas du vent (in french)


Interview with Jean-Pierre Gattuso on ocean acidification.

rfi, L’acidification des oceans, c’est pas du vent, 9 February 2009.

The Monaco Declaration and research priorities report released 30 January at ASLO

More than 150 scientists from 26 countries are calling for immediate action by policymakers to reduce CO2 emissions sharply to avoid possible widespread and severe damage to marine ecosystems from ocean acidification. This warning comes in The Monaco Declaration and the Research Priorities Report developed at the 2nd international symposium on The Ocean in a High-CO2 World, to be released during a press conference on Friday, 30 January, at the ASLO Aquatic Sciences Conference in Nice.

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Leading scientists from all over the world call for immediate action to stop ocean acidification

Under embargo until 10.30 am (GMT), Friday 30 January

Paris, 29 January – More than 150 leading marine scientists from 26 countries are calling for immediate action by policymakers to reduce CO2 emissions sharply so as to avoid widespread and severe damage to marine ecosystems from ocean acidification. They issued this warning in the Monaco Declaration, released on 30 January.

The scientists note that ocean acidification is already detectable, that it is accelerating. They caution that its negative socio-economic impacts can only be avoided by limiting future atmospheric CO2 levels.

Prince Albert II of Monaco has urged political leaders to heed the Monaco Declaration as they prepare for climate negotiations at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen this year. “I strongly support this declaration, which is in full accord with my efforts and those of my Foundation to alleviate climate change,” he said.

The Monaco Declaration is based on the Research Priorities Report developed by participants at last October’s 2nd international symposium on The Ocean in a High-CO2 World, organized by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP), with the support of the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation and several other partners.
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Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act of 2009

The Senate is close to approving bill S.22 (Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009) which includes “Subtitle D: Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act of 2009”.

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Hard core data shows 14 per cent drop in coral growth on GBR since 1990

It’s official: the biggest and most robust corals on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) have slowed their growth by more than 14 per cent since the “tipping point” year of 1990. Evidence is strong that the decline has been caused by a synergistic combination of rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification.

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Workshop on best practices for ocean acidification research planned

The need for standardized protocols and reporting of data has been highlighted at numerous ocean acidification workshops over the past few years. Common methods are crucial if we are to identify differences (or lack thereof) in calcification among various taxa, regions, and over time. It is also imperative that data be reported in a manner that will be comprehensible and accessible to scientists several decades from now if changes are to be detected. Specifically, the international research community needs to establish agreed protocols for calcification rate measurements and mesocosm / perturbation experiments, as well as for protocols for data reporting.

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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book