Archive for the 'Jobs' Category

AOOS is hiring

Location: Anchorage, Alaska

Application deadline: 25 May 2022

More information and application procedure.

To apply, submit a resume and a letter of interest with your proposal on what roles you could fill and at what level of effort per week to Holly Kent at Kent@AOOS.org.

AOOS is seeking to fill three roles within our organization:

  • Ocean Acidification Network Coordinator
  • Outreach Director
  • Community Engagement Coordinator

Due to their overlapping and synchronous natures, these roles could be filled by one or more employees working anywhere from a half-time to a  full-time basis.

AOOS is a regional network representing a consortium of federal, state and local agencies, research organizations, and private industry committed to tracking, predicting, and adapting to changes in Alaska’s coastal and ocean environment. AOOS is part of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) and the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). AOOS works in partnership with Axiom Data Science to maintain the Ocean Data Explorer data portal.

Responsibilities for the OA Network Coordinator include:

  • Working with scientists to improve research coordination on OA in Alaska (identifying gaps, highlighting priorities, communicating across disciplines);
  • Engaging with stakeholders to identify OA information needs around the state and develop strategies within the network to best meet those needs;
  • Forming and facilitating connections between OA researchers and Alaska stakeholders;
  • Facilitating meetings, working groups, and workshops that include researchers, fishermen, Tribes, shellfish growers, educators, and others (separately or together);
  • Expanding engagement with rural and Tribal communities;
  • Presenting at public forums, including to local communities, interested stakeholder groups, and at national meetings and conferences;
  • Distilling new ocean acidification findings into understandable terms and developing outreach
    materials for a variety of audiences;
  • Maintaining and expanding OA Network communication pathways (network website, social media, monthly electronic newsletter, etc.); and
  • Engaging with the ocean acidification community beyond Alaska (NOAA’s Ocean Acidification program, other ocean acidification networks and researchers, the Global Ocean Acidification Network, etc.).

Responsibilities for the Outreach Coordinator include:

  • Translating marine science into understandable language for diverse audiences through outreach materials, presentations, and engagement;
  • Working with AOOS staff to update and implement the AOOS outreach plan;
  • Working with Axiom staff to expand outreach and usability of the AOOS data portal;
  • Giving public presentations and representing the AOOS program in public forums;
  • Maintaining the AOOS website, social media, impact report, newsletters, and other existing outlets while looking for new avenues for communication and engagement;
  • Supporting existing and new partnerships related to coastal hazards, navigation safety, climate change, and ecosystem impacts; and
  • Assisting with other aspects of the AOOS program.

Responsibilities for the Community Engagement Coordinator include:

  • Expanding relationships with stakeholders across Alaska to help understand stakeholder needs and ensure AOOS is producing products and resources to meet those needs;
  • Working with Program Coordinators to develop community engagement strategies for AOOS programs including the Alaska Ocean Acidification Network, the Alaska Harmful Algal Bloom Network, the Alaska Ecosystem Monitoring Network, and the Regional Ocean Data Sharing Partnership;
  • Expanding engagement with rural and Tribal communities;
  • Facilitating meetings, working groups, and workshops that include researchers, fishermen, Tribes, shellfish growers, educators, and others (separately or together);
  • Translating marine science into understandable language for diverse audiences through outreach materials, presentations, and engagement;
  • Giving public presentations and representing the AOOS program in public forums; and
  • Assisting with other aspects of the AOOS program.
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Postdoctoral opportunity: One Ocean Hub PDRA

Salary: UE07 £34,304 – £40,927 (per annum)

Location: College of Science and Engineering – School of GeoSciences

Duration: Fixed-term contract (15 months) – Full time

Interviews will be held at the end of May/start of June.

Apply

We are looking for a PDRA with a proven interest in how marine organisms respond to various stressors and the ability to design and run multiple stressor experiments. Cold-water corals are under threat from combined environmental and anthropogenic stressors. In order to understand how these vulnerable marine ecosystems will change in the coming decades, controlled experiments are required to test how single and multiple stressors will impact their survival and proliferation.

The PDRA will be primarily responsible for managing and conducting long-term multiple stressor experiments (deoxygenation, ocean acidification and changes in temperature) on the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa. This will include physiological assessment of the coral health, manipulation and monitoring of seawater chemistry, and skeletal analysis of coral samples. The PDRA will analyse impacts of multiple stressors on L. pertusa to underpin work being done in the UK GRCF-funded One Ocean Hub (OOH) and the EU H2020-funded iAtlantic project to understand the impacts of climate change to cold-water coral reef framework, and what this may mean to these biodiversity rich ecosystems. The experiments will take place in the experimental mesocosms at the St Abbs. Marine Station.

The primary role of the PDRA is to lead on the long-term experimentation of Lophelia pertusa in multiple stressor systems. This includes husbandry of the live coral, modification of sampling points depending on preliminary data, managing the different experimental conditions (setting, monitoring and recording seawater parameters including carbonate chemistry), conducting periodic physiological measurements on L. pertusa including respiration and growth, and assessing skeletal characteristics of the coral skeletons. The PDRA would lead on the compilation, quality checking, refinement, and analysis of these different data types. A secondary role would be to document the processes involved and record these in a way to be used as a training tool for researchers interested in doing similar research.

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PhD studentship: developing meaningful marine biodiversity indicators to support conservation

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship. The studentship will start on 1 October 2022.

Application deadline: 20 May 2022

Interview: 7 June 2022

Location: Plymounth

Funding: UK students, EU students, International students

Funding amount: £16,062 per annum + full Home tuition fees

Apply

To apply please use the online application form. Simply search for PhD Biological Sciences (and select the entry point of October 2022),then clearly state that you are applying for a PhD and name the project at the top of your personal statement.

Online application

Before applying, please ensure you have read the Doctoral College’s general information on applying for a research degree.

For more information on the admissions process please contact doctoralcollege@plymouth.ac.uk.

Project description

At the base of marine foodwebs, changes in plankton communities affect ecosystem services, including climate change mitigation and fisheries yield. A suite of plankton indicators, developed in collaboration with policy-makers, are used to assess aspects of plankton diversity, functioning, and productivity for UK/EU biodiversity policy. There is now an urgent need to address key questions on what the observed changes in these indicators mean for natural capital and ecosystem services and how the indicators respond to climate change, including extreme events. Answering these questions is urgently required to provide robust scientific information to inform decision-making.

Methodology

The student will apply statistical modelling approaches to data from the world’s most extensive plankton network to 1) develop policy-relevant plankton indicators for climate change (including ocean acidification); 2) analyse relationships between plankton indicators, determining which are most robust for inclusion in policy assessments; 3) investigate links between plankton indicators and existing foodweb indicators to understand how these relationships change spatio-temporally, and 4) explore what changes in these indicators mean for natural capital and ecosystem services. This work will be in collaboration with policy working groups and Defra to ensure relevance of outputs to UK/EU marine biodiversity and natural capital policy frameworks.

Training 

The student will receive training in spatial-temporal analysis of large datasets, statistical techniques, natural capital, and application of science to policy through participation in UK and international science-policy workshops, expanding the student’s personal network through working with scientists and key policy stakeholders involved in the UK/EU marine biodiversity conservation community.

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PhD position: modelling the biodiversity impacts of non-food biomass

Application deadline: 1 May 2022

About the position

We have a vacancy for a PhD candidate in the Industrial Ecology Programme at the Department of Energy and Process Engineering.

The appointment has a duration of three years with an anticipated start date in September 2022. The appointment is financed through the Horizon Europe project “Biodiversity and trade: mitigating the impacts of non-food biomass global supply chains” (BAMBOO).

BAMBOO is a project with partners in the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Peru and Tanzania. The project aims to improve the tools to assess the impacts of international trade of non-food biomass on biodiversity, to help policymakers, retailers and other stakeholders to assess and mitigate their impacts. We plan to develop models to quantify biodiversity impacts using four indicators: species richness, mean species abundance, functional diversity and ecosystem services and we will use a combination of existing models and newly developed ones. To improve the representation of trade, we will create a new, hybrid multiregional input-output (MRIO) model based on the well-known EXIOBASE and the biomass-specific FABIO models. 

The focus of this PhD is the development of models for quantifying the impacts of ocean acidification, seabed damage and overexploitation on species richness and investigate how impacts on ecosystem services can be included in the models. The project includes collaboration with Leiden University in the Netherlands, ETH Zurich in Switzerland and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.

We have a vacancy for a PhD candidate in the Industrial Ecology Programme at the Department of Energy and Process Engineering.

The appointment has a duration of three years with an anticipated start date in September 2022. The appointment is financed through the Horizon Europe project “Biodiversity and trade: mitigating the impacts of non-food biomass global supply chains” (BAMBOO).

BAMBOO is a project with partners in the Netherlands, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, Peru and Tanzania. The project aims to improve the tools to assess the impacts of international trade of non-food biomass on biodiversity, to help policymakers, retailers and other stakeholders to assess and mitigate their impacts. We plan to develop models to quantify biodiversity impacts using four indicators: species richness, mean species abundance, functional diversity and ecosystem services and we will use a combination of existing models and newly developed ones. To improve the representation of trade, we will create a new, hybrid multiregional input-output (MRIO) model based on the well-known EXIOBASE and the biomass-specific FABIO models. 

The focus of this PhD is the development of models for quantifying the impacts of ocean acidification, seabed damage and overexploitation on species richness and investigate how impacts on ecosystem services can be included in the models. The project includes collaboration with Leiden University in the Netherlands, ETH Zurich in Switzerland and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.

IndEcol is a pioneer in the development and application of industrial ecology methods, as well as the use of large data sets and scientific computing in industrial ecology. We focus on understanding resource use and environmental pollution associated with human activities, assessing the environmental aspects of different technologies and modeling society’s use of materials. IndEcol combines world-class competence in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Input-Output analysis (I/O), and Material Flow Analysis (MFA) with scientists’ contribution to IPCC assessment reports, the International Resource Panel, active participation to the UNEP/SETAC Life-Cycle Initiative, and numerous publications featured in high-ranked journals. IndEcol hosts its own International MSc program and contributes to NTNU’s engineering education- The research team consisting of seven faculty members, the Industrial Ecology Digital Laboratory, and about 50 researchers, post.docs and PhDs.

The Head of Department is Professor Terese Løvås. The position’s supervisor is Professor Francesca Verones, the co-supervisor is Dr. Konstantin Stadler. 

Duties of the position

  • Modelling impacts of ocean acidification, seabed damage and overexploitation on a global scale 
  • Work on the inclusion of ecosystem services within the framework of life cycle impact assessment
  • Deriving spatially differentiated characterization factors
  • Dissemination of results in scholarly journals, at international conferences and for the general public
  • Integrate the results into the BAMBOO project by linking impacts and characterization to the hybrid MRIO model and contribute to the BAMBOO deliverables

About the application

The application and supporting documentation to be used as the basis for the assessment must be in English.

Publications and other scientific work must follow the application. Please note that applications are only evaluated based on the information available on the application deadline. You should ensure that your application shows clearly how your skills and experience meet the criteria which are set out above. 

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EPA fellowship in ocean and coastal protection/marine pollution prevention

Organization: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Reference Code: EPA-OW-OWOW-2022-05

How to Apply: Connect with ORISE…on the GO!  Download the new ORISE GO mobile app in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store to help you stay engaged, connected, and informed during your ORISE experience and beyond!

A complete application consists of:

  • An application
  • Transcript(s) – For this opportunity, an unofficial transcript or copy of the student academic records printed by the applicant or by academic advisors from internal institution systems may be submitted. All transcripts must be in English or include an official English translation. Click here for detailed information about acceptable transcripts.
  • A current resume/CV, including academic history, employment history, relevant experiences, and publication list
  • Two educational or professional recommendations. Click here for detailed information about recommendations.

All documents must be in English or include an official English translation.

Application Deadline: 30/04/2022 11:59:00 PM Eastern Time Zone

Description: *Applications may be reviewed on a rolling-basis and this posting could close before the deadline. Click here for information about the selection process.

EPA Office/Lab and LocationThree research opportunities are currently available at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Office of Water (OW), Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW). The appointments will be served in the Oceans, Wetlands, and Communities Division (OWCD) in the Freshwater and Marine Regulatory Branch (FMRB) or the Ocean and Coastal Management Branch (OCMB) located in Washington D.C.

OWCD manages and implements a number of ocean and coastal protection programs. The programs are responsible for the development of policy, guidance, and regulations that protect our ocean, coastal, and wetland resources. The programs include Ocean Dumping Management, Coastal Wetlands, Ocean Acidification, Coral Reef Protection, Vessel Discharges, and Coastal Resiliency. The programs work closely with EPA’s seven coastal Regional Offices (Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 10), partner agencies, states, and a vast number of interested stakeholders.

For nearly 50 years, EPA has worked to prevent adverse impacts to human health and the ocean and coastal environment. Specifically, EPA’s Freshwater and Marine Regulatory Branch, in coordination with EPA’s seven coastal Regional Offices (Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 10), administers the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act permitting and ocean disposal site designation, management, and monitoring program (Ocean Dumping Management Program) to protect human health and the environment from pollution caused by ocean dumping. EPA’s Ocean and Coastal Management Branch manages a myriad of ocean and coastal programs aimed at controlling vessel pollution, protecting coral reefs and coastal wetlands, monitoring and assessing coastal acidification, and enhancing coastal resiliency.

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Video on the demonstration of using autonomous reef monitoring structures (ARMS)

Parent Sector : Field Office

Duty Station: Bangkok

Type of contract : Non Staff

Duration of contract : From 1 to 6 months

Recruitment open to : External candidates

Application Deadline (Midnight Paris Time) : 10-APR-2022

OVERVIEW OF THE FUNCTIONS OF THE POST

1. Background and Rationale

Coral reefs, one of the most biologically diverse and productive ecosystems, have been threatened by anthropogenic impacts, climate change and ocean acidification. Without biodiversity, the ecosystem will lose resilience and be unable to sustain the provision of goods and services. Hence, monitoring biodiversity and associated communities in coral reef ecosystem is essential for forecasting ecosystem vulnerability to disturbance.

As part of the efforts in monitoring the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystem, the IOC Sub-Commission for the Western Pacific (WESTPAC) promotes the use of Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) as a standard method to examine and monitor the most diverse community of organisms on a coral reef, the cryptobiota. The design of ARMS aims to simulate the structural complexity of a reef to attract colonizing marine invertebrates. The Standard Operating Procedures for ARMS could be found here (http://file.iocwestpac.org/OA/SOP/Chapter%203/Chapter%203-draft%20ARMS%20SOP-01%20Nov%202018.pdf )

Along with ARMS, Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) are also used to evaluate how the changes of carbonate in seawater affect calcification and accretion rates of calcareous and fleshy algae. The principle is that the calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) are correlated to seawater aragonite saturation state. Predictions of reduced coral calcification rates imply that coral reef communities will experience ecological phase shifts as calcifying organisms are negatively impacted by fluctuating seawater chemistry. The Standard Operating Procedures for CAU could be found here (http://file.iocwestpac.org/OA/SOP/Chapter%204/Chapter%204-draft%20CAU%20SOP-01%20Nov%202018.pdf)

To meet the demands and develop capacity of Member States and their research institutions for monitoring ecological impact of ocean acidification on coral reefs, we would like to develop an audio-video material introducing the use and processing of ARMS and CAUs. The product will be shared widely with interested institutions in the region, and also ensure the data that could be collected and comparable over the long years.

2. Key Duties and Responsibilities

Under the overall authority of the Director of the UNESCO Regional Bureau for the Asia and Pacific, and the direct supervision of the Head of the WESTPAC Office, the incumbent shall perform the following duties:

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Consultant for ocean science project management and development

Call for Proposals

UNESCO is inviting written proposals for an individual Consultant for the work assignment described in attachment A.

To enable you to prepare a proposal for this assignment, please find attached the Terms of Reference (Attachment A) and the UNESCO’s contract for Individual Consultants, the contracting modality used for these assignments (Attachment B). Your written offer should comprise:

(a) A Technical Proposal consisting of

  • an up to date curriculum vitae using the UNESCO template including the contact details of three professional references;
  • a motivation letter indicating how your qualifications and experience make you suitable for the assignment;
  • a description of a proposed approach and methodology for undertaking the assignment.

(b) The total amount to be charged for the assignment, which should be quoted in US dollars or in euros only and should indicate the consultant’s monthly rate. Please show any travel costs separately

Your proposal and any supporting documents must be in either English or French. Documents should as far as possible be consolidated into a single document and all file names should include the family name of the applicant.

UNESCO places great emphasis on ensuring that the objectives of the work assignment, as described in the Terms of Reference, are met. Accordingly, in evaluating the proposals for the assignment, attention will focus first and foremost on the technical elements. From those proposals deemed suitable in terms of the criteria in the Terms of Reference, UNESCO shall select the proposal that offers the Organisation best value for money.

Your proposal should be submitted by e-mail k.isensee@unesco.org and s.secco@unesco.org (please send to both to ensure your submission is well received and processed) no later than end of the day (23:59 CET) 1 April 2022. E-mail proposals should not exceed 5MB.

It is the individual’s responsibility to ensure that his/her proposal is received by the deadline.

Thank you for your interest in this UNESCO assignment; and we look forward to receiving your proposal.

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Delivery of introductory training on ocean acidification for Commonwealth government officials

The Commonwealth Secretariat is seeking to engage a qualified contractor to deliver remote training to Commonwealth country officials, providing an introduction to ocean acidification, its impacts on marine assets, and possible policy responses.

Location: Home-Based
Duration: approx. 3 months 
Fee: £15,000
Closing Date: 01 April 2022, at 17:00 GMT

The Contractor will be expected to draw upon existing materials from the Commonwealth Secretariat and its partners, including the use of the Commonwealth Blue Charter Action Group on Ocean Acidification’s Policymakers’ Handbook for Addressing the Impacts of Ocean Acidification, as well as the expertise that the Contractor will be expected to bring to the assignment. Training is aimed towards government officials from Champion and member countries of the Commonwealth Blue Charter Action Groups; particularly, Ocean and Climate Change, Ocean Acidification, and Ocean Observation. The contract has two main pieces of work: i) preparing and delivering an online ‘live’ course, and ii) preparing materials for an online self-paced course based on (i). 

The preferred Contractor or consultancy firm should hold the profile below, which should be outlined in the cover letter and CV: 

  • University degree required, and post-graduate degree(s) preferred.
  • Demonstrable experience of more than 5 years in ocean acidification and climate change with a graduate degree or more than 8 years with a bachelor’s degree;
  • Topic-specific experience and expertise in ocean acidification and its impacts on marine assets;
  • Experience in the development of materials for government officials;
  • Experience in teaching/training strongly preferred.

This opportunity is open to individuals, consultancies and consortia.
Please apply for this contract by submitting a CV, a brief proposal (up to 5 pages), and a concise cover letter (1-2 pages) to bluecharter@commonwealth.int by 1 April 2022. 

The proposal should show how the consultancy would be carried out to meet the specific objectives set out in this TOR. It should include a short statement of the candidate’s / team’s relevant expertise and experience along with the bid amount. Evaluation will be based on both competency and cost. Where submissions are similar in quality, preference will be given to Contractors that are Commonwealth citizens or entities registered in a Commonwealth country.

Ocean Acidification for Commonwealth government officials(231.16 KB)

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Southern Ocean ocean acidification hub seeking expressions of interest

The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) and Global Ocean Acidification Network (GOA-ON) are seeking expressions of interest for the development of a Southern Ocean collaborative hub on ocean acidification. The hub will provide transdisciplinary expertise to coordinate research activities on ocean acidification, its drivers and biological responses from local to regional scales, and to communicate research outcomes. The effort with provide a mechanism to identify and prioritise emerging observational needs including identifying the combined role of ocean acidification with other stressors (e.g. warming, sea-ice extent, fishing pressure) in influencing the Southern Ocean biology.

More information is available here.

Expressions of interest for involvement in the development of the collaborative hub can be submitted through this form, due 18th March 2022.

For specific questions on this group and the positions, please contact Alyce Hancock.

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Call for the development of a Southern Ocean collaborative hub on ocean acidification

The Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS and Global Ocean Acidification Network (GOA-ON) are seeking expressions of interest for the development of a Southern Ocean collaborative hub on ocean acidification. The hub will provide transdisciplinary expertise to coordinate research activities on ocean acidification, its drivers and biological responses from local to regional scales, and to communicate research outcomes. The effort with provide a mechanism to identify and prioritise emerging observational needs including identifying the combined role of ocean acidification with other stressors (e.g. warming, sea-ice extent, fishing pressure) in influencing the Southern Ocean biology.

More information is available here.

Expressions of interest for involvement in the development of the collaborative hub can be submitted through this form, due 18th March 2022. 

For specific questions on this group and the positions, please contact Alyce Hancock (hancock@soos.aq).

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Postdoctoral associate: ocean acidification and anthropogenic carbon cycling (job number: 20860)

Apply

Working at MIT offers opportunities, an environment, a culture – and benefits – that just aren’t found together anywhere else. We value diversity and strongly encourage applications from individuals from all identities and backgrounds, like yours. If you’re motivated, want to be part of a unique, multicultural, collaborative, and inclusive community, and help shape the future – then take a look at this opportunity.

Information on MIT’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement can be found at the bottom of this posting.

POSTDOCTORAL ASSOCIATE, OCEAN ACIDIFICATION AND ANTHROPOGENIC CARBON CYCLINGEarth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)-Center for Global Change Science (CGCS), to conduct research on uptake of anthropogenic carbon and ocean acidification as related primarily to the South Pacific and Southern Oceans on the upcoming GEOTRACES GP-17 cruises. The position is available in the Marine Carbon and Physical Chemistry Lab-Woosley Lab.  The position focuses primarily on direct measurement of the marine inorganic carbon system in the South Pacific Ocean and the Amundsen Sea and will involve laboratory and field intensive research directly measuring pH, total alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon to study human perturbations to the marine carbon cycle.  Will be expected to participate in at least one research cruise over two months in duration; build collaborations within the GEOTRACES community; supervise undergraduate researchers as appropriate; present work at national and/or international meetings; and advance a safe, supportive, and welcoming laboratory environment.  Scientists of all backgrounds are welcome and encouraged to apply.  

Job Requirements

REQUIRED:  Ph.D. in oceanography, physical or analytical chemistry, biogeochemistry or related field; experience with the measurement of marine carbon parameters; expertise in analytical and physical chemistry; ability to work both independently and collaboratively; strong organizational and interpersonal skills; emotional intelligence; meticulous attention to detail, and ability to work under pressure.  Direct experience in marine chemistry and carbon cycling would be ideal. Must have completed all Ph.D. requirements by the start date.  Job #20860

This is a one-year position with extension based upon performance and funding. The start date is flexible, but preferably before June 2022 and no later than August 1, 2022.


In addition to applying online via the MIT website, candidates are asked to submit their application material to Academic Jobs Online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/21290.  A complete application needs to include a cover letter, CV, brief statement of research interests and professional plans, and the names and email addresses of three references.

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Visiting assistant professor earth and oceanographic science (oceans) (reference number: F00183JP)

Departament: Earth and Oceanographic Science

Position start: 1 July 2022

Review of applications: 18 March 2022 (and continue until the position is filled)

Position summary:

Bowdoin College’s Department of Earth and Oceanographic Science invites applications for a one-year, full-time, visiting assistant professor position beginning July 1, 2022. A PhD by July 1, 2022 is preferred; ABD considered. Teaching responsibilities include two oceanography courses with labs and two without, for a total of four courses per year. Course topics might include marine biogeochemistry, ocean acidification, or paleoceanography. Successful candidates will demonstrate a strong commitment to inclusive excellence in undergraduate teaching. For a description of inclusive excellence, please consult the following resource: Williams, et. al., Toward a Model of Inclusive Excellence.  

Bowdoin is a community that warmly welcomes people of all backgrounds. We encourage applications from candidates committed to the support of an inclusive campus community and those who will enrich and contribute to the College’s multifaceted diversity. We especially encourage people from historically excluded groups to apply. Bowdoin College offers opportunities for professional development, including annual conference travel support, mentoring programming, and grants to support scholarly research. 

The College’s location along the rocky Maine coast provides excellent local field sites for teaching and research. Department facilities include access to research vessels, oceanographic sampling equipment, CTD, SmartCHEM nutrient autoanalyzer, UV-vis spectrophotometer, HPLC, DIC analyzer, SEM with CL/EDS/EBSD capabilities, and a real-time oceanographic buoy (http://bowdoin.loboviz.com/). Bowdoin’s Schiller Coastal Studies Center is located on Harpswell Sound within a 30-minute drive from campus and offers a marine laboratory with flowing seawater, research dock, boating equipment, teaching laboratory and classroom space. For more information about the department and the marine lab, please visit http://www.bowdoin.edu/earth-oceanographic-science and https://www.bowdoin.edu/coastal-studies-center/ 

Bowdoin College accepts only electronic submissions. Please submit 1) a cover letter; 2) a curriculum vitae; 3) a 2-page statement that describes your teaching practices and how they support a commitment to equity and inclusion; 4) a 1-page research statement; and 5) the names and contact information for three references who have agreed to provide letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation will be automatically requested as part of the application process.

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Senior environmental chemist (reference number: 182469)

Apply before: 11:55 pm on Wednesday 23rd February 2022

Location: Aberdeen, Scotland, AB11 9DB

Apply at advertiser’s site

About the job

Summary

Would you like to work for an organisation focussed on the assessment and protection of the Scottish marine environment and the people it supports? 

Do you have good analytical chemistry skills, worked within a quality system and have a knowledge of the marine environment? 

Can you demonstrate the ability to assess and interrogate datasets as well as produce papers and reports on the outcomes within set deadline? 

If so, we may have the role for you, we are looking for a Senior Environmental Chemist to join our team. The Marine Environmental Assessment Group produce data on the concentrations and biological effects of environmental contaminants, nutrient concentrations, ocean acidification, marine litter and supporting determinants.  Allowing the environmental status assessments to be undertaken for Scottish, UK (Marine Monitoring and Assessment Strategy; UKMMAS), and international (OSPAR) policy drivers. 

Research undertaken by MSS helps to underpin our environmental monitoring programmes and the advice that is supplied to Scottish and UK Governments, and internationally via the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES). 

The main role of Senior Environmental Chemist is to manage the water chemistry monitoring and research projects in the Marine Environmental Assessment Group which is part of the Environment Monitoring and Assessment Programme, based in Aberdeen. This post is required for the provision of nutrient, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll and ocean acidification data in support of environmental status assessments and research projects.

Job description

Manage the MSS water chemistry staff. Ensure objectives are in place for staff and hold regular meetings to discuss progress of work and staff development. 

Manage the analysis of nutrients, chlorophyll and ocean acidification ensuring the delivery of relevant Schedule of Service milestones. Provide input to environmental status assessments undertaken for Scottish (Marine Atlas), UK (Marine Monitoring and Assessment Strategy; UKMMAS), and international (OSPAR and EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive; MSFD) policy drivers.? Identify and monitoring data gaps in respect of eutrophication? and ocean acidification monitoring.

Act as Deputy Technical Manager, ensure all responsibilities are carried out in order to maintain the quality system to a standard that ensures continuation of Marine Scotland Science accreditation following the annual assessment under ISO 17025. 

Be the primary point of contact for MS Policy Divisions in respect of chemical oceanography, and provide advice as requested. Attend relevant meetings and provide MSS meeting reports 

Act as Scottish Government Science lead for Ocean acidification. Manage the ocean acidification projects ensuring samples are analysed and the data assessed. Review data to ensure data is of acceptable quality to be used in data assessments and ensure such data is submitted to relevant data centres. Internationally represent Marine Scotland Science, as may be required, on Ocean Acidification groups including;

Prepare reports, presentations and peer-reviewed papers on the nutrient, chlorophyll and ocean acidification data for a range of audiences (students through to scientific experts).

Responsibilities

1. Good communication skills (written and verbal). Demonstrated ability to carry out research of publishable quality. Should also be able to demonstrate ability to present verbally to an International audience at conferences, workshops or at working groups.
2. Experience of directly relevant analytical techniques, including the analysis of nutrients and for the measurement of ocean acidification parameters.
3. Good level of numeracy with experience of using statistical analyses to understand and interpret datasets
4. Project Management skills. This post will be responsible for the delivery of both monitoring and research projects

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Call for Proposal: services for the WESTPAC intercalibration exercise on pH and total alkalinity (TA) measurement for ocean acidification monitoring and research

Application date: 26 Jan 2022 – 15 Feb 2022

Type of Contract: Contract for Services
Duration: 01 March 2022– 31 August 2022 (tentatively)
Closing date: 15 February 2022 at 17:00 hrs Bangkok time

Work Assignment
Under the overall authority of the Director of the UNESCO Regional Bureau for the Asia and Pacific and the direct supervision of the Head of the WESTPAC Office, the contractor acts as an administrative and technical support for the WESTPAC Intercalibration Exercise on pH and Total Alkalinity (TA) measurement, between 01 March – 31 August 2022. 

For more details and to submit the application, please visit here.

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PhD position: nutrient cycling, eutrophication, hypoxia, and acidification

Agency: University of South Alabama

Location: Mobile, Alabama

Job Category: Graduate Assistantships

Start Date: 15/08/2022

Last Date to Apply: 01/04/2022

Website: https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/artsandsci/marinesciences/

Description:

A PhD research assistantship is available for a sharp and motivated student interested in estuarine and coastal nutrient, carbon, and oxygen cycling and how changes in these cycles impact living resources. Estuarine and coastal ecosystems located at the land-sea interface are among the most highly productive systems on Earth and due to their proximity to land are also among the most susceptible to human activities. Individually and cumulatively, stressors degrade the marine flora, fauna, and ecosystems humans rely upon. Therefore, these impacts are of great societal concern. The successful candidate will work in the lab of Dr. John Lehrter (https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/artsandsci/marinesciences/drjohnlehrter.html) whose research is aimed at understanding and untangling the effects of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems. Specific objectives include understanding the water-column and sediment biogeochemical cycling of carbon, oxygen, and nutrients in response to anthropogenic forcing and applying this understanding to the stewardship of marine resources. Research tools include field and laboratory studies, satellite remote sensing, and numerical ecosystem models. The student will be expected to develop a research thesis project that is complementary to these efforts.

Texas A&M University, 3 February 2022. More information.

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Grant opportunity: NOAA Ocean Acidification Program education mini-grant program (NOAA-OAR-OAP-2022-2007166)

Deadline for full application: 18 February 2022

Agency name: Department of Commerce

Apply

Description:

The Ocean Acidification Program education mini-grant initiative, is a competitively based program that supports coastal and ocean acidification education programs that are responsive to the goals of the NOAA OA Education Implementation Plan and the 2021-2040 NOAA Education Strategic Plan. Priority goals include engaging diverse audiences in ocean acidification education and outreach, matching ocean acidification communication needs with existing research, education and outreach activities, while developing innovative approaches for community involvement. These goals are part of NOAA’s efforts to increase Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility (DEI&A as defined in this executive order https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/06/25/executive-order-on-diversity-equity-inclusion-and-accessibility-in-the-federal-workforce/) in ocean literacy, stewardship, and workforce development, particularly in inland and underserved communities.

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PhD opportunity: iron availability to marine phytoplankton in a changing ocean

Funded studentship

Open to UK applicants

Application Deadline: 21 February 2022

Interview: 9 March 2022

Apply

Description:

Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2) are causing climate change, global warming, and ocean acidification (https://www.ipcc.ch/). Phytoplankton sequester 50% of global CO2 and supply >50% of new nitrogen used for primary production, which sustains the entire food chains in the oceans (Falkowski 2012). Other than light and major nutrients, phytoplankton growth is strongly influenced by the availability of the metal iron (Fe) (Boyd et al. 2007; Browning et al. 2017; Moore et al. 2013), because the metal is essential for photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, but is also very scarce in the open ocean due to its unique chemistry. The bioavailability of Fe is therefore tightly linked to atmospheric CO2 change as well as ocean carbon and nitrogen cycles.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2018 report concluded that the large error in predicting marine CO2 cycling and primary productivity was partly a result of poor knowledge on the bioavailability of Fe (IPCC 2018). In order to understand how Fe controls atmospheric CO2 levels and oceanic productivity, it is therefore important to first understand the controls on the availability of the metal to marine phytoplankton. The prevailing view is that more than 99% of Fe in seawater is complexed by naturally occurring organic ligands (Gledhill and Buck 2012) and such organic complexation is believed to reduce Fe availability to marine phytoplankton (Morel et al. 2008). However, data from recent studies are inconsistent with this long-standing paradigm as it is observed that natural seawater Fe was highly available to phytoplankton (Shaked et al. 2021).

The project will seek to resolve this paradox. Specifically, we want to know 1) Is organically complexed Fe a major contributor in phytoplankton nutrition? And/or 2) How the ongoing ocean changes (e.g., acidification) alter Fe bioavailability? We will use model ligands and phytoplankton species to unravel the underlying mechanisms, and use naturally occurring ligands and phytoplankton assembles collected during oceanographic cruises to further examine the ideas. The project will involve biological (e.g. algae incubation experiments), chemical (e.g. extraction and characterisation of organic ligands) and modelling tools (e.g., Fe speciation) to improve our knowledge of Fe bioavailability. This is a timely interdisciplinary project that will ultimately improve our capacity to model and predict the role of Fe nutrition in the changing ocean.

This exciting PhD project comes with a range of research and training opportunities. The student will work on a highly topical issue with an international team, in a multi-disciplinary environment, will be able to participate in GEOTRACES oceanographic cruises (in the Equatorial Pacific and/or the Indian Ocean) and will have the opportunity to carry out some of the research at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Germany, one of the world’s leading marine science institutions. The student will be trained in analytical techniques for seawater chemistry, state-of-the-art culturing methods for marine phytoplankton, in the use of chemical/modelling tools for metal speciation. They will be strongly encouraged to attend national/international conferences and publish their research. A career development PhD training program provided by the University of Liverpool will also be provided.

We are looking for a 1st class student with an oceanographic, biological and/or chemical background. If you are interested, please contact Dr Fengjie LIU (fengjie.liu2@liverpool.ac.uk), for more information.

To apply for this opportunity, please visit: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-research/how-to-apply/ and click the ‘Ready to apply? Apply online.’

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Postdoctoral researcher: EASMO (reference number 221-EASMO)

The Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT) in Bremen is a member of the Leibniz Association, which is supported by the German Federal and State Governments. Through its research, ZMT contributes to developing strategies for sustainable use of tropical coastal systems.

Project rationale and summary:

Species are “on the move” throughout the planet escaping hostile climatic conditions. These movements have advanced four times faster in the ocean than on land, causing dramatic ecosystem changes and redistributing resources across borders. The ecological, food security, and governance implications are obvious. Yet, two persistent gaps hinder our capacity to effectively manage coastal social-ecological systems to safeguard both fisheries and human wellbeing in the face of such challenges: i) regional studies documenting recent species redistributions have not quantified the societal repercussions, and ii) future projections have mapped expected catches and metrics of socio-economic impact (e.g. fisheries revenue) globally and at coarse resolutions, unfitting to support local or regional decision-making. Fish redistributions are particularly concerning, as three billion people depend on them for 15% of their animal protein intake and essential nutrients to tackle malnutrition. Although fish range shifts should be urgently investigated in the Global South, studies have focused disproportionately on wealthy parts of the world. EASMO will investigate for the first time the impact of climate change on the distribution of reef fish throughout the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP) considering cascading effects on biodiversity, ecosystem function, reefs’ contributions to people, climate feedbacks, and socio-economic wellbeing. Ultimately, it will deliver several layers of new scientific knowledge that can be directly integrated into decision-making tools, support adaptive transboundary governance approaches, and propel actions for meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals 2 Zero hunger, 13 Climate action, and 14 Life below water. Find more details on the project here.

Selection criteria:

  • PhD degree on marine fish ecophysiology, species distribution modelling and climate change ecology
  • Knowledge on behavioural and physiological responses of fish to climate stressors (ocean warming and acidification)
  • Practical experience in fish husbandry and experimental ecology and conducting single and/or multi-stressor climate change experiments on fish
  • Research experience integrating empirical datasets across biological levels and/or into statistical models
  • Familiarity and experience in modelling future climate change effects on species distribution
  • Interest and knowledge on the effects of ocean acidification on fish and the pathways through which fish may affect the ocean’s carbonate chemistry
  • Attention to detail and demonstrated proficiency in managing large datasets
  • Strong analytical skills including demonstrated proficiency in applying a broad range of basic to advanced modelling and statistical analysis tools
  • Demonstrated excellence in English scientific writing and oral communication
  • A positive collaborative work ethics that promotes diversity, equality, and inclusiveness
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Life support systems operator, Summerland Key, FL

Location: Elizabeth Moore International Center for Coral Reef Research and Restoration (IC2R3), Summerland Key, Florida

Primary Function: Responsible for the construction, operation, and maintenance of both open and closed seawater systems and their associated equipment. Assist in operation and maintenance of the Climate Ocean Acidification System.

Primary Duties:

  • Follow preventative maintenance program for all equipment
  • Piping system installation and repair
  • Operate all seawater systems including heater/chiller, pumps, ozone & nitrogen generation
  • Assist CAOS technician with its operation and maintenance
  • Respond to system alarms and perform corrective actions as needed 
  • Additional duties as needed to support other Mote research/restoration projects, assist visiting scientists, maintenance and repair of building and facility, and other tasks related to the daily operation of a full service marine laboratory.

Minimum Qualifications or Requirements:

  • Ability to work outside in all weather conditions as well as in tight quarters is required
  • Valid Florida driver’s license.

Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

  • Ability to troubleshoot life support systems
  • Capable of performing repair and maintenance to mechanical systems
  • Ability to work with PVC up to 4”
  • Ability to safely use hand and power tools
  • Ability to adapt to a changing environment, work independently on certain tasks with minimal direct supervision, and good practical problem-solving abilities.
  • Normal hours are 8:00 – 5:00 Tuesday – Saturday; however, occasional weekend and evening hours may be required.

To Apply:

Interested applicants should apply on line by choosing 2021 Life Support Systems Operator, Summerland Key, FL IC2R3 at  https://mote.smapply.org/prog/job_applicants or mail a single package including cover letter, resume or c.v. and the contact information for three references to Mote Marine Laboratory, Attn: Human Resources, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sarasota, FL 34236 before 5pm January 7, 2022.

All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status or other protected category.  Mote participates in E-Verify.

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Ocean acidification research opportunity: advancing pH measurement technologies in the Delaware Estuary and Delaware’s Inland Bays

The Delaware Environmental Institute is accepting applications for an undergraduate research opportunity for a project called, “Advancing pH measurement technologies for coastal ocean acidification monitoring in the Delaware Estuary and Delaware’s Inland Bays,” with Prof. Wei-Jun Cai’s research group.

A significant portion of atmospheric CO2 is absorbed by our oceans. While this removes large portions of CO2 from our air, potentially reducing global warming, it gradually acidifies our oceans. Furthermore, these changes in acidification occur at a greater rate in nearshore waters as compared to the open ocean.

This gradual increase in ocean pH interferes with the ability of many ocean organisms to develop shells and skeletons, having disastrous effects on oyster reefs, coral reefs and ultimately the human food chain. Delaware’s shellfish aquaculture industry is still in its infancy so understanding the impacts of acidification on local ecosystems is crucial for this industry to thrive. Despite the urgent threats that acidification poses to Delaware’s estuarine and coastal ocean waters and the resources therein, we currently lack the appropriate tools to properly measure and assess its impacts in state waters. Without acidification monitoring, the development of effective adaptation and mitigation strategies in these areas is impeded.

The undergraduate student selected for this opportunity will learn practices and methods associated with mCP-based spectrophotometric pH analysis and with sensor operation and deployment.

To apply send a cover letter, resume and transcript to Yolanda Williams-Bey at yolanda@udel.edu no later than Friday, Dec. 10, 2021.

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