The effect of global warming and ocean acidification on Halichondira panicea bacteria

Marine sponges are becoming an increasing source of novel biomedical and antibacterial compounds. Many of these compounds are synthesized as secondary metabolites from symbiotic bacteria and have immense potential in the pharmaceutical industry. However, climate change may pose a threat to the viability of marine sponges and result in the loss of future medical discoveries. Therefore, this paper looks at the effect climate change may have on marine sponges by subjecting fragments of the marine sponge, Halichondria panicea, into aquaria representing different climate change scenarios to study the effect that global warming and ocean acidification may have on its symbiotic bacteria. To model climate change towards the end of the 21st century, conditions from the IPCC’s 2014 climate change report were simulated to determine specific growth conditions. The fragments were placed in the different RCP growth conditions for two weeks, then dissociated, filtered, and the extracts incubated on Hektoen enteric agar for 48 hours. The results showed that climate change has adverse effects on the marine sponge, Halichondria panicea, by decreasing their symbiotic bacterial population by around 18 %

Hasnah G., 2021. The effect of global warming and ocean acidification on Halichondira panicea bacteria. IJHSR 3(3): 18-20. Article.


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