Elevated temperature and changed carbonate chemistry: effects on calcification, photosynthesis, and growth of Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)

Recent ecophysiological studies of coralline algae have highlighted the effects of several environmental concerns, such as acidification and warming of the world’s coastal oceans. Among these, elevated temperature might be the most critical environmental factor affecting rocky benthic communities, where coralline algae tend to dominate the habitat. This study was conducted to investigate changes in photosynthesis, calcification, and growth of the geniculate coralline alga Corallina officinalis after 7 d of acclimation to four temperature conditions (13, 18, 23, and 28°C). Calcification rates decreased with increasing temperature in the light, although growth of C. officinalis did not differ considerably under different temperatures. Furthermore, although photosynthesis was largely unaffected by increasing temperature, respiration increased significantly under the highest temperature. These physiological responses are strongly related to the carbonate chemistry of seawater, which is itself affected by elevated temperature. Our results also indicate that C. officinalis exhibits physiological tolerance to a wide range of temperatures, even when increased by more than 10°C above ambient temperature of 18°C. Consequently, if noncalcareous macroalgae are negatively affected by higher temperatures, the ability of C. officinalis to acclimate to these conditions could cause it to become a more dominant species of rocky macroalgal habitats as ocean temperatures continue to rise.

Kim J.-H., Min J., Kang E. J. & Kim K. Y., 2018. Elevated temperature and changed carbonate chemistry: effects on calcification, photosynthesis, and growth of Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta). Phycologia 57 (3): 280-286. Article (subscription required).

0 Responses to “Elevated temperature and changed carbonate chemistry: effects on calcification, photosynthesis, and growth of Corallina officinalis (Corallinales, Rhodophyta)”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,128,559 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book