The effects of ocean acidification on the establishment and maintenance of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

Coral reefs are increasingly under threat from the effects of anthropogenic climate change, including rising sea surface temperatures and more acidified waters. At the foundation of these diverse and valuable ecosystems is the symbiotic relationship between calcifying corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae, Symbiodiniaceae – one that is particularly sensitive to environmental stressors. Ocean acidification (OA) results in the lowering of pH and changes to carbonate chemistry and the inorganic carbon species available to marine organisms. Cnidarians such as reef-building corals may be particularly at risk from OA, as changes in pH and carbon availability can alter central physiological processes, including calcification, photosynthesis, acid-base regulation, metabolism and cell-cycle regulation. Yet, while responses to OA have been well researched at the physiological level, results have often been contradictory, and a clear understanding of the nature and extent of impacts on the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis remains equivocal. This thesis therefore aimed to provide further insights into the effects of OA on the establishment and maintenance of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. My research utilised the well-established model system for this symbiosis: the sea anemone Exaiptasia diaphana (‘Aiptasia’) and its native symbiont Breviolum minutum.

Bown J., 2022. The effects of ocean acidification on the establishment and maintenance of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. MSc thesis, Te Herenga Waka-Victoria University of Wellington, 150 p. Thesis.

0 Responses to “The effects of ocean acidification on the establishment and maintenance of a model cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply




  • Reset

Subscribe

OA-ICC Highlights


%d bloggers like this: