Archive for the 'Projects' Category

Fighting ocean acidification: Smith Cove blue carbon project (text & video)

Oyster beds, kelp, and eel grass in Smith Cove to enhance efforts against ocean acidification. The Port of Seattle is leading many efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG emissions), the most important step towards combatting ocean acidification. The Port has been very active in enhancing shoreline habitat, reducing pollution, and engagement with communities. At Smith Cove in Elliott Bay, the Port of Seattle and its partners are conducting scientific research that will contribute to building resiliency in local ecosystems related to ocean acidification. As part of the Port of Seattle’s commitment to the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (OA Alliance), the Port prepared its first ever Ocean Acidification Action Plan to detail steps we are taking to address ocean acidification. “Last year, the Port of Seattle was the first port in the world to join the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (OA Alliance), recognizing the many ways in which ocean acidification impacts the maritime sector and acknowledging the important role ports can play in leading environmental action,” said Stephanie Bowman, Port of Seattle Commissioner. “We encourage other ports to join in on these efforts.” The Smith Cove Blue Carbon Pilot Project is located on Port and City-owned aquatic lands near Terminal 91. The goal of the project is to evaluate the potential benefits of marine habitat enhancement of kelp, eelgrass, and oysters on carbon sequestration, water quality (amelioration of seawater acidification), and habitat productivity. The Port of Seattle, along with partners at the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the Puget Sound Restoration Fund (PSRF) is monitoring the site over three years for potential benefits in and around the site and includes a community-based science initiative.

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Ocean tribute award 2022

Submit your marine conservation project and be one of the nominees. The winning team will receive prize money of 20,000 euros to advance their project.

The expert jury will judge on effectiveness, participation and networking.

Be there with your project and apply now!

Apply now!

Who can apply?

Our jury is looking forward to initiatives with the following goals:

  • Development of innovative, future-oriented technologies for the protection and preservation of the oceans
  • Promotion and raising awareness of scientific knowledge and development of research capacities
  • Reduction of waste and nutrients for clean seas
  • Sustainable management to protect marine and coastal ecosystems and measures to restore fish stocks
  • High-profile public awareness work, which points to abuses and offers solutions for the sustainable use of our waters
  • Reduction of acidification of the oceans and their effects

When is the application period?

We are looking forward to all applications submitted through our form, open until 31 of August 2021. Simply insert all needed information and take your chance!

Continue reading ‘Ocean tribute award 2022’

NOAA PMEL Carbon Program

To understand the changing chemistry of the oceans and the impacts of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems. Our observations of key physical, chemical, and biological parameters support NOAA’s overall efforts to predict how marine ecosystems will respond and to develop management strategies for adapting to the consequences of ocean acidification.

NOAA – PMEL Carbom Program. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Mediterranean Sea Acidification (MedSeA) in a changing climate

The MedSeA project addresses ecologic and economic impacts from the combined influences of anthropogenic acidification and warming, while accounting for the unique characteristics of this key region.

MEdSea. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Research notes from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

This website has been developed to serve as a portal for information on active research on ocean acidification within the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington including work with partners at the University of Rhode Island, Jamestown Soklallam Tribe, Puget Sound Restoration Fund, and Northeastern University.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Resource.

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program seeks to better prepare society to respond to changing ocean conditions and resources by expanding understanding of ocean acidification, through interdisciplinary partnerships, nationally and internationally. Ocean acidification is occurring because our ocean is absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, leading to lower pH and greater acidity. This is causing a fundamental change in the chemistry of the ocean from pole to pole.

NOAA OAP. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program projects

The Ocean Acidification Program supports a wide variety of projects both within NOAA and cooperative and academic institutions. These research projects examine specific themes aimed to determine our nation’s vulnerability to ocean acidification.

NOAA OAP. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

PMEL Carbon Program

The PMEL carbon group is working with a number of academic and government partners to conduct large-scale coastal surveys of pCO2 and related water column chemical and hydrographic measurements to determine the spatial scales of CO2 sources and sinks, and causes thereof, along the East, Gulf, and West Coasts of North America.

NOAA. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE)

FOCE is a technology facilitating studies of the consequences of ocean acidification for marine organisms and communities by enabling the precise control of CO2 enrichment within in situ, partially open, experimental enclosures. Current FOCE systems control experimental CO2 perturbations by real-time monitoring of differences in seawater pH between treatment (i.e. high-CO2) and control (i.e. ambient) seawater within experimental enclosures.

Wikipedia, 3 February 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Ocean Acidification Day of Action

In 2018, The Ocean Foundation launched its Waves of Change campaign to raise awareness of the issue of ocean acidification, culminating with the inaugural Ocean Acidification Day of Action on the 8th January 2019. The 8th of January was chosen as 8.1 is the current pH of the ocean, and our goal is to ensure that the pH of the ocean does not fall below that level. TOF will continue to host Ocean Acidification Day of Action events on the 8th of January each year.

The Ocean Foundation. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Building CapacIty in Ocean AcidificaTion MoniToring in the Gulf of GuineA (BIOTTA)

The BIOTTA project aims to develop an integrated and sustainable OA observing system in the GoG and create a platform to facilitate collaboration among and incorporate the expertise of researchers in the GoG region to identify, understand and design solutions to improve research on OA.

PAGO. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme (UKOA)

The £12M, 5 year UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme (UKOA) is the UK’s response and is jointly funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The programme will take advantage of international collaboration opportunities, primarily with the German ocean acidification programme (BIOACID), the European research programme (EPOCA), the Mediterranean programme (MedSeA) and potentially with the emerging US ocean acidification research programme.

UK Ocean Acidification Research Programme (UKOA), 31 December 2016. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Pathfinders Ocean Acidification project

The Pathfinders Ocean Acidification project is a 18 month project, leaded by Dr Jamie Shutler (PML) and funded by the European Space Agency. The objective is to quantify parameters required for Ocean Acidification (OA) research. The work is to develop and validate new and innovative products combining field data, satellite observation, and models.

Pathfinders Ocean Acidification, 9 July 2014. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS)

The Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS) is a data management project and is responsible for hosting and providing access for ocean carbon data collected from around the world. OCADS was established in February 2017.

NOAA, 6 July 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

2021 Triennial Review – Draft Water Quality Standards project

DEQ is conducting a Triennial Review process to review Oregon water quality standards and determine priority projects for the next three years. During this process, DEQ took public input on a list of priority water quality standards review and revision needs. The result will be a report that outlines the projects that DEQ’s water quality standards program will complete or initiate between 2021 and 2023.

DEQ – Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, 4 May 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: document/pdf

DEcreasing Seawater Acidification Removing atmospheric Carbon (DESARC-MARESANUS

The research project DESARC-MARESANUS addresses two environmental problems of great importance: the increase in atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) and the consequent acidification of the oceans. The project aims at studying and assessing a process for removing CO2 from the atmosphere and simultaneously counteract ocean acidification.

DESARC-MARESANUS. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: document/pdf

CARBOCHANGE project

CARBOCHANGE was a Collaborative Project funded by the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (2007-2013) under grant agreement number 264879. The project had started in March 2011 and ended in February 2015. CARBOCHANGE investigated the ocean’s quantitative role in the uptake of carbon under changing climate conditions, thereby using past and present data to infer on our ocean’s future.

CARBOCHANGE, 28 February 2015. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

IMBER – current endorsed projects

IMBeR aims to provide an open, flexible framework to encourage national, regional, and international participation in its scientific activities, to achieve its objectives as outlined in the IMBeR Science Plan and Implementation Strategy. Endorsement of marine research projects and activities is one way of becoming part of the IMBeR community.

IMBER. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

The acid test: ICES/OSPAR joint Study Group on Ocean Acidification (SGOA)

The Joint ICES/OSPAR Study Group on Ocean Acidification (SGOA) was formed in 2012 to develop an ocean acidification monitoring programme for the waters of the OSPAR area. SGOA brought together experts from the disciplines of chemistry, biology, and others to address the challenge of designing a long-term monitoring programme that examines both the biogeochemical changes associated with ocean acidification and the responses of potentially-sensitive marine life.

ICES/OSPAR, 16 March 2015. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

IMBER – completed endorsed projects

Here are the links to the completed projects and theirs descriptions in our archive.

IMBER. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage


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