Ability of eelgrass to alter oyster growth and physiology is spatially limited and offset by increasing predation risk

Marine foundation species have strong effects on sympatric species, but the strength may vary along environmental gradients. Climate change is shifting the distribution and magnitude of environmental gradients, making identification of when and where foundation species effects occur necessary for effective management. We reviewed existing work to identify expected mechanisms by which seagrass affect suspension feeding bivalves, then tested whether these effects shifted across estuarine conditions for two species of oysters (native Ostrea lurida and non-native Crassostrea gigas) grown in and out of eelgrass (Zostera marina) at six estuarine sites in Washington state. Hypothesized mechanisms of eelgrass influence include reduced predation pressure, reduced or altered food availability, and amelioration of environmental (pH) stress. We analyzed oyster survival, shell and tissue growth, shell strength, and stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) biomarkers. Oyster survival was > 20% lower in eelgrass at lower-estuary sites, but not up-estuary sites. Both species grew faster in eelgrass at one low-estuary (higher pH) site, but not elsewhere. Shell strength in eelgrass increased by 21.1% for native but decreased by 12.6% for non-native oysters. FA and SI biomarkers only differed in eelgrass at one site but correlated significantly to growth among individuals. No measurement showed a consistent response to eelgrass across estuarine conditions and taxa, and responses were often opposite of expectations based on published literature. These results have important implications for management and restoration of oysters in areas with eelgrass.

Lowe A. T., Kobelt J., Horwith M. & Ruesink J., in press. Ability of eelgrass to alter oyster growth and physiology is spatially limited and offset by increasing predation risk. Estuaries and Coasts. Article (subscription required).

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