Archive for the 'Program' Category



Science to Save the Reefs: An interdisciplinary dialogue between economist and biologist to propose practical solutions against Ocean Acidification and other global stress

Ocean acidification (OA), often called “the other CO2 problem”, is a consequence of an increased release of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Man-made CO2 does not only accumulate in the atmosphere, it also dissolves readily in seawater thereby releasing protons with, as a consequence, an increase in seawater acidity. The acidity of the oceans has increased by about 30% since the beginning of the industrial era, and may increase by more than 150% by the end of the century. This increase in acidity impacts the lives and well-being of many marine organisms and can also disrupt coastal and marine ecosystems and the services they provide. Among threatened ecosystems, coral reefs are probably the most sensitive to both climate change and ocean acidification.

The Centre Scientifique de Monaco is particularly involved in the scientific study of the impact of this environmental change on marine organisms, and more particularly on coral reefs since the 90s, developing studies from the molecular mechanism of action of OA to socio-economic impacts on coastal human societies. Scientific research at the CSM is associated within the Association Mongasque pour lAcidification des Ocans (AMAO), which includes media and funding activities carried out in the Principality of Monaco to communicate, promote and facilitate international actions on ocean acidification and other global stress factors affecting the marine environment fully supported by HSH Prince Albert II.

Continue reading ‘Science to Save the Reefs: An interdisciplinary dialogue between economist and biologist to propose practical solutions against Ocean Acidification and other global stress’

Understanding and addressing the impact of ocean acidification on marine life and coastal livelihoods in California

California is a founding member of the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification (Alliance; https://www.oaalliance.org/), which is a network of governments and affiliate (NGOs, universities, businesses, and associations) members responding to the threats of ocean acidification and changing ocean conditions.

The Alliance was initially announced at the Our Ocean conference in September 2016 and formally announced by Governor Brown and other founding members in December in San Diego at the Western Governors Association. Now, with nearly 40 members, the Alliance will grow its coalition to 60+ governments and affiliate members by June 2018 who are committed to taking actions to combat ocean acidification, both within their region and globally. Alliance members will take meaningful actions within their jurisdiction, as allowed by their existing capacity, to develop Ocean Acidification Action Plans. The Action Plans will assist in the implementation of UN SDG 14.3 by advancing the five goals identified in the Alliances Call to Action:

Continue reading ‘Understanding and addressing the impact of ocean acidification on marine life and coastal livelihoods in California’

Response of diatoms to ocean acidification

Marine diatoms are important primary producers that thrive in diverse and dynamic environments. Using the model species Thalassiosira pseudonana, we demonstrated in a detailed physiological and transcriptomic survey that approximately 40 percent of the transcriptome varied significantly and recurrently, reflecting large, reproducible cell-state transitions between four principal states: I) “dawn,” following twelve hours of darkness, II) “dusk,” following twelve hours of light, III) exponential growth and nutrient replete, IV) stationary phase and nutrient depleted. Repeated shifts in the transcript levels of hundreds of genes encoding sensory, signaling, and regulatory functions accompanied the four cell-state transitions, provided a preliminary map of the highly coordinated gene regulatory program under varying conditions. These results explain, in comprehensive detail, how the diatom gene regulatory program operates under varying environmental conditions (Ashworth et al. 2013).

Continue reading ‘Response of diatoms to ocean acidification’

Development and strengthening of the regional research and monitoring network, as part of global efforts, on the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems in the Western Pacific and its adjacent regions in support of the SDG 14.3

The ocean has absorbed about one third of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions since the industrial revolution, greatly reducing the impact of this greenhouse gas on the climate. However, this massive input of CO2 is generating global changes in the chemistry of seawater, especially on the carbonate system. These changes are collectively referred to as ocean acidification because increased CO2 lowers seawater pH (i.e., increases its acidity).

Recent studies have shown that the resulting decrease in ocean pH will make it more difficult for marine calcifying organisms, such as corals, molluscs, and calcareous plankton, to form biogenic calcium carbonate, and existing calcium carbonate structures will become vulnerable to dissolution. Thus, ongoing acidification of the oceans poses a threat to ocean-based security. There are concerns that marine ecosystems will change, that biodiversity will be lost, and that important ecosystem services that human societies depend upon for food security, livelihoods, and coastal protection could be significantly impacted. Unfortunately, the effects of ocean acidification on organisms and ecosystems remain poorly understood, with most of our knowledge based on simplified laboratory experiments.

Continue reading ‘Development and strengthening of the regional research and monitoring network, as part of global efforts, on the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reef ecosystems in the Western Pacific and its adjacent regions in support of the SDG 14.3’

Alaska OA Network enters 2017 with new structure

As the Alaska Ocean Acidification Network approaches its first birthday, a new executive committee and a set of working groups are poised to help advance ocean acidification in Alaska.

“We are very grateful for the broad spectrum of people who helped get the network off the ground,” said Darcy Dugan, the network director.  “As our interim steering committee expanded to 20 people over the course of the year, we decided we could best harness the energy by identifying a small and nimble executive committee and a number of topic-specific working groups.”

The working groups will be focusing on the topics of Outreach & Communication, K-12 Education, Engagement with the fishing community, Engagement with Tribes, Policy, and Research & Monitoring.  Most are set to have their first meeting in the next month. If you are interested in joining a working group, please email Darcy at dugan@aoos.org.

The first meeting of the new executive committee took place February 16.  Members include:

  • Darcy Dugan– Alaska Ocean Observing System (Alaska OA Network Director)
  • Shallin Busch – NOAA Ocean Acidification Program
  • Dorothy Childers – Alaska Marine Conservation Council
  • Wiley Evans – Hakai Institute
  • Bob Foy – NOAA AFSC Kodiak Lab
  • Davin Holen – Alaska Sea Grant
  • Jeremy Mathis – NOAA Arctic Program/UAF Ocean Acidification Research Center

Summaries from committee meetings and updates from working groups will be posted on the Alaska OA Network website under “Network documents“.

Further information.

Global, U.S. leaders launch International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification, 13 December 2016, San Diego, California

To attend this press conference remotely, tune in to the event via Periscope livestream by following @PCCleads on Twitter!

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Today leaders representing U.S. cities, states, businesses and national governments from around the globe, joined together to sign onto the newly formed International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification. Members who commit to joining the OA Alliance will work collaboratively and individually to take actions that combat ocean acidification and changing ocean conditions, moving climate policy forward regardless of the national political winds.

Scientists have found that ocean acidification resulting from greenhouse gas emissions has increased by 30 percent and is expected to double over pre-industrial levels by the end of the 21stcentury. The oceans are the primary protein source for 2.6 billion people, and support $2.5 trillion of economic activity each year. However, drastic changes are occurring in our oceans – from oyster hatchery die-offs to coral reef bleaching – that are being felt by coastal communities around the world.

A formal launch event of the OA Alliance is taking place at Hotel del Coronado in San Diego on Tues. Dec. 13 at 10 a.m.

Continue reading ‘Global, U.S. leaders launch International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification, 13 December 2016, San Diego, California’

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC-Oceans) ceases operation, all activities to transition to NOAA

Dear Ocean Carbon Scientists,

Data management activities for the ocean component of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC-Oceans) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have recently stopped and this letter provides information on steps being taken to minimize the impact of this stoppage on the oceanographic community. Data, numerical data packages (NDPs), data synthesis product pages, and utilities (such as CO2SYS) at CDIAC-Oceans will continue to be accessible through ORNL until September 30, 2017 when the entire CDIAC will fully cease operations.

Effective January 1, 2017, Alex Kozyr will become an Affiliate Staff member for NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) to support ocean carbon data management and provide customer support similar to what he has done at CDIAC. He will also assist in the transition of ocean carbon data management to NCEI.

NCEI is now archiving CDIAC’s ocean carbon data and will complete the transfer prior to CDIAC’s closure. A plan to integrate the content of CDIAC’s ocean carbon web sites and services is being developed, with a target completion date of March 31, 2017.

For more details on the transition and how to submit and access ocean carbon data in the future, please check out this page: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/oceanacidification/ocads/transition.html.

Continue reading ‘Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC-Oceans) ceases operation, all activities to transition to NOAA’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book