Multimarker response of the ragworm Hediste diversicolor (Polychaeta) to seawater acidification derived from potential CO2 leakage from the CCS sub-seabed storage site in the Baltic Sea

Highlights

• Seawater acidification affected physiological traits, LPO and growth of Hediste diversicolor from the southern Baltic Sea.

• Moderate hypercapnia (pH 7.5–7.1) induced an increase in metabolic rate of the polychaetes and a decline of their growth.

• The most acidic environment (pH 6.5) caused metabolic slow down limiting energy turnover and growth.

• Reduced seawater pH did not impact energetic reserves so, proteins were not used as substrates under acidic conditions.

• High tolerance of the ragworms to hypercapnia stems probably from pre-adaptation to natural pH reduction events in sediment.

Abstract

Sub-seabed Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is conceived as safe technology with small likehood of negative consequences to the marine ecosystem but CO2 escape from geological reservoir still poses potential environmental risk. If carbon dioxide leakage occurs carbonate chemistry in the bottom zone and sessile benthic fauna are expected to be the most likely affected by elevated levels of CO2. Though generic mechanisms and advisory conclusions on the presumable impact of increased acidity on the marine benthic biota were formulated they cannot be applied uniformly across different environmental variables as specific local conditions may alter biological response to hypercapnia. A laboratory experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of medium-term (8 wk) exposure to seawater acidification (pH 7.7–6.5) on the infaunal polychaete Hediste diversicolor from the southern Baltic Sea using multimarker approach. Under moderate acidity (pH 7.5 and 7.1) the polychaetes were found to increase metabolic rate (by 13.4% and 19.6%, respectively) and reduce their body mass (by 8.1% and 5.5% wet weight, respectively and by 6.1% and 3.0% dry weight, respectively) whilst enhancing synthesis of antioxidant malondialdehyde (by 22.8% and 65.3%, respectively). In the most acidic environment (pH 6.5) the ragworms showed overall metabolic slow down (by 34.8%) and impaired growth (e.g. by 10.2% for length of the first three segments) indicative of low vulnerability to hypercapnia. High implicit tolerance of the polychaetes to increased acidity in the environment stems inevitably from a certain level of pre-adaptation to pH reduction events which occur in organic-rich stratified sediments due to intense aerobic biomineralization leading often to oxygen depletion and formation of toxic hydrogen sulphide. Acidification did not affect energetic reserves suggesting that costs of acid-base maintenance were covered mainly from assimilated food and that proteins were not used as metabolic substrates.

Sokołowski A., Brulińska D. & Sokołowska E., 2020. Multimarker response of the ragworm Hediste diversicolor (Polychaeta) to seawater acidification derived from potential CO2 leakage from the CCS sub-seabed storage site in the Baltic Sea. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 530-531: 151433. doi: 10.1016/j.jembe.2020.151433. Article (subscription required).

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