Increased food supply mitigates ocean acidification effects on calcification but exacerbates effects on growth

Because many of the negative effects of ocean acidification on marine life may result from underlying energetic short-falls associated with increased metabolic demands, several studies have hypothesized that negative responses to high CO2 could be reduced by energy input. Although this hypothesis was supported by a recent meta-analysis, we believe that the meta-analytic calculation used was not appropriate to test the stated hypothesis. Here, we first clarify the hypothesis put forward, the crux being that the effects of increased food supply and CO2 interact statistically. We then test this hypothesis by examining the available data in a more appropriate analytical framework. Using factorial meta-analysis, we confirm that food addition has a positive effect and CO2 has a negative effect on both growth and calcification. For calcification, food addition did indeed reduce CO2 impacts. Surprisingly, however, we found that food addition actually exacerbated the effects of acidification on growth, perhaps due to increased scope upon which CO2 effects can act in food-replete situations. These interactive effects were undetectable using a multilevel meta-analytic approach. Ongoing changes in food supply and carbonate chemistry, coupled with under-described, poorly understood, and potentially surprising interactive outcomes for these two variables, suggest that the role of food should remain a priority in ocean acidification research.

Brown N. E. M., Bernhardt J. R., Anderson K. M. & Harley C. D. G., 2018. Increased food supply mitigates ocean acidification effects on calcification but exacerbates effects on growth. Scientific Reports 8: 9800. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-28012-w. Article.


  • Categories

  • Keywords

  • Reset

Subscribe:

OA-ICC Highlights

OA-ICC bibliographic database instructions


%d bloggers like this: