Archive for the 'Projects' Category



Help share information and collaborate on ocean acidification research!

Would you like to know about on-going and planned ocean acidification research activities? Would you like to promote others to work with you?

One of the goals of the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) is to promote collaborative research projects, such as joint experiments and access to research facilities. To this end, the OA-ICC is looking to compile a list of ongoing and planned research projects on ocean acidification where there is a possibility for other researchers to participate. The list will be shared online to promote information exchange and collaboration.

To contribute to this effort, please send an email including the information below to:

Lina Hansson & Marine Lebrec, OA-ICC Project Office, IAEA Environment laboratories (oaicc(at)iaea.org)

Information needed:

  • location
  • contact (name, institute, email)
  • brief research focus
  • potential collaborator focus
  • start date
  • end date
  • web link (if available)

Continue reading ‘Help share information and collaborate on ocean acidification research!’

Acid–base physiology over tidal periods in the mussel Mytilus edulis: size and temperature are more influential than seawater pH

Ocean acidification (OA) studies to date have typically used stable open-ocean pH and CO2 values to predict the physiological responses of intertidal species to future climate scenarios, with few studies accounting for natural fluctuations of abiotic conditions or the alternating periods of emersion and immersion routinely experienced during tidal cycles. Here, we determine seawater carbonate chemistry and the corresponding in situ haemolymph acid–base responses over real time for two populations of mussel (Mytilus edulis) during tidal cycles, demonstrating that intertidal mussels experience daily acidosis during emersion. Using these field data to parameterize experimental work we demonstrate that air temperature and mussel size strongly influence this acidosis, with larger mussels at higher temperatures experiencing greater acidosis. There was a small interactive effect of prior immersion in OA conditions (pHNBS 7.7/pCO2 930 µatm) such that the haemolymph pH measured at the start of emersion was lower in large mussels exposed to OA. Critically, the acidosis induced in mussels during emersion in situ was greater (ΔpH approximately 0.8 units) than that induced by experimental OA (ΔpH approximately 0.1 units). Understanding how environmental fluctuations influence physiology under current scenarios is critical to our ability to predict the responses of key marine biota to future environmental changes.

Continue reading ‘Acid–base physiology over tidal periods in the mussel Mytilus edulis: size and temperature are more influential than seawater pH’

OA-ICC portal for ocean acidification biological response data

Studies investigating the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms and communities are increasing every year. Results are not easily comparable since the carbonate chemistry and ancillary data are not always reported in similar units and scales, and calculated using similar sets of constants.

In response to this problem, a data compilation is hosted at PANGAEA Data Publisher for Earth and Environmental Science and maintained in the framework of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) in collaboration with Xiamen University, China and the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, France . The goal of this data compilation is to ensure the archival and streamlining of data on the biological response to ocean acidification (and other environmental drivers), as well as to provide easy access to the data for all users. Published data are made available to the scientific community in a coherent format and with a citable DOI.

This new user-friendly portal allows users to easily access relevant biological response data based on a set of filters.

We would greatly appreciate your feedback on this new tool. You can do so by contacting the OA-ICC at oaicc@iaea.org.

Continue reading ‘OA-ICC portal for ocean acidification biological response data’

OA-ICC bibliographic database updated

An updated version of the OA-ICC bibliographic database is available online.

The database currently contains more than 5,200 references and includes citations, abstracts and assigned keywords. Updates are made every month.

The database is available as a group on Mendeley. Subscribe online or, for a better user experience, download the Mendeley Desktop application and sync with the group Ocean Acidification (OA-ICC). Please see the “User instructions” for further details.

Continue reading ‘OA-ICC bibliographic database updated’

New OA-ICC portal for ocean acidification biological response data

Studies investigating the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms and communities are increasing every year. Results are not easily comparable since the carbonate chemistry and ancillary data are not always reported in similar units and scales, and calculated using similar sets of constants.

In response to this problem, a data compilation is hosted at PANGAEA Data Publisher for Earth and Environmental Science and maintained in the framework of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) in collaboration with Xiamen University, China and the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, France . The goal of this data compilation is to ensure the archival and streamlining of data on the biological response to ocean acidification (and other environmental drivers), as well as to provide easy access to the data for all users. Published data are made available to the scientific community in a coherent format and with a citable DOI.

This new user-friendly portal allows users to easily access relevant biological response data based on a set of filters.

We would greatly appreciate your feedback on this new tool. You can do so by contacting the OA-ICC at oaicc@iaea.org.

Continue reading ‘New OA-ICC portal for ocean acidification biological response data’

Turning the tides on ocean acidification

We are the 2018-2019 UCLA Undergraduate Research Team for Ocean Acidification in the Santa Monica Bay. Alongside the Bay Foundation and the Institute of Environmental Science (IoES) our team is working to continue this multi-year research project on kelp and sea grass. We aim to understand the effects of ocean acidification on these key underwater biomes and explore the future persistence of these ecosystem.

Continue reading ‘Turning the tides on ocean acidification’

Informing adaptation decisions for Alaska’s salmon fisheries

Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). Credit: NOAA

This project began in 2018 and will end in 2021

We are integrating multiple areas of research on the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) and the influence of “tipping points” (i.e., regime shifts) on Alaska’s fisheries, particularly chum salmon in the Gulf of Alaska. We will develop indicators based on a range of information, from fish prices to harvest volume and average fish size. The project will use results from a bio-economic model to create decision tools and OA fisheries adaptation strategies for salmon managers to minimize the risk of OA for salmon populations and those who depend on them.

Why We Care

Alaska is expected to experience ocean acidification faster than any other coastal waters in the United States, primarily due to its colder water which absorbs more carbon dioxide than warmer waters. With seafood industry job incomes over $1.5 billion annually and communities that rely on healthy oceans for subsistence, nutrition, and culture, increased ocean acidification is expected to have significant implications in Alaska. For Alaskans dependent on salmon, it is critical to understand how salmon may fare in a higher-acidity environment, and the cultural and economic implications of their response. There is a potential for environmental thresholds, which, once crossed are difficult if not impossible to reverse. Further, there is a need to better understand the ramifications for humans from these effects and the implications of how human society responds.

Continue reading ‘Informing adaptation decisions for Alaska’s salmon fisheries’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book