Archive for the 'Projects' Category

Assessing ocean acidification as a driver for enhanced metals uptake by blue mussels

Research Area(s): Stressor Impacts and Mitigation / Biological Effects of Contaminants and Nutrients

Region(s) of Study: Waterbodies / Gulf of MaineU.S. States and Territories / New Hampshire

Primary Contact(s): dave.whitall@noaa.govdennis.apeti@noaa.gov

This project began in April 2021 and is projected to end in September 2024.

Ocean acidification, resulting from changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, will impact how a variety of chemicals, including metals, behave in the environment. This could lead to increased uptake of metals in important species, such as blue mussels. Body burdens of pollutants in bivalves are important considerations for seafood safety and, as a result, aquaculture. We will explore these relationships both in the laboratory and the field, and produce a robust data set that will be useful to stakeholders in coastal management and aquaculture and provide the societal benefit of better informed aquaculture siting.

Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis).

Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis). Credit: NOAA NMFS.

Continue reading ‘Assessing ocean acidification as a driver for enhanced metals uptake by blue mussels’

Strengthening sustainability in an acidified ocean: does the co-culture of seaweeds and shellfish improve shell integrity in farmed red abalone?

Start/End: February, 2021 to January, 2022

Abalone harvesting and consumption have a long history in California, but recreational and commercial fisheries have been forced to close due to overfishing, habitat destruction, harmful algal blooms, and unseasonably warm water temperatures. Red abalone aquaculture is the only remaining commercial abalone production method in the state, but as ocean acidification impacts coastal waters, there are widespread concerns that abalone aquaculture will also be impacted. Abalone appear to be vulnerable to ocean acidification, exhibiting shell damage and reduced growth in high carbonic acid conditions.

Previous research by the Co-PI’s has shown that growing abalone together with seaweed could help reduce carbon dioxide input into the water, hence buffering the acidity of the water and improving abalone growth and shell area. However, there are still questions as to whether this system also leads to improved shell calcification, which can reduce breakage and make both the meat and shell more marketable. 

Continue reading ‘Strengthening sustainability in an acidified ocean: does the co-culture of seaweeds and shellfish improve shell integrity in farmed red abalone?’

Request for proposals for a regional training hub for ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands

Proposal Request Synopsis
The Ocean Foundation is seeking an institution (or partnership of institutions) in the Pacific Islands to serve as a regional training hub for ocean acidification for the broader Pacific Islands community. This request for proposals to host the hub is part of a larger project that seeks to build capacity in the Pacific Islands to monitor and respond to ocean acidification through the distribution of equipment, training, and ongoing mentorship. The Ocean Foundation hopes to work with the selected regional training hub to identify additional sources of funding and resources to support the hub in perpetuity, but is unable to guarantee more than the funding laid out below. The regional training hub will be a critical partner in this project and will play a role in sustaining ocean acidification monitoring and research in the region beyond the three-year
time frame of this project. Eligibility and instructions to apply are included in this request for proposals. Proposals are due no later than April 1st, 2021 and should be sent to ioai@oceanfdn.org .

Continue reading ‘Request for proposals for a regional training hub for ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands’

Status and trends of Arctic Ocean environmental change and its impacts on marine biogeochemistry: findings from the ArCS project

Ocean observation research theme under ArCS project, “Theme 4: Observational research on Arctic Ocean environmental changes”, aimed to elucidate the status and trends of ongoing Arctic Ocean environmental changes and to evaluate their impacts on Arctic marine ecosystem and the global climate system. For these purposes, we conducted field observations, mooring observations, laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and international collaborative research focusing on the Pacific Arctic Region (PAR) and from Pan-Arctic point of views. As a result, we have published several scientific studies on environmental changes and their impact on the climate and ecosystem. In this manuscript, we compiled these results with some concluding remarks. We found physical environmental changes of water cycle, sea-ice and ocean conditions, heat transport, and ocean mixing in the Arctic Ocean and surrounding areas. We also examined chemical properties, carbon, cycle, and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean. In addition, new findings regarding impacts of sea-ice reduction to primary productivities were published. For public outreach of Arctic research, we were able to develop an educational tool (a board game named “The Arctic”) in collaboration with Themes 6 and 7.

Continue reading ‘Status and trends of Arctic Ocean environmental change and its impacts on marine biogeochemistry: findings from the ArCS project’

Coastal Ocean Data Analysis Product in North America (CODAP-NA) – An internally consistent data product for discrete inorganic carbon, oxygen, and nutrients on the U.S. North American ocean margins

Internally-consistent, quality-controlled data products play a very important role in promoting regional to global research efforts to understand societal vulnerabilities to ocean acidification (OA). However, there are currently no such data products for the coastal ocean where most of the OA-susceptible commercial and recreational fisheries and aquaculture industries are located. In this collaborative effort, we compiled, quality controlled (QC), and synthesized two decades of discrete measurements of inorganic carbon system parameters, oxygen, and nutrient chemistry data from the U.S. North American continental shelves, to generate a data product called the Coastal Ocean Data Analysis Product for North America (CODAP-NA). There are few deep-water (> 1500 m) sampling locations in the current data product. As a result, cross-over analyses, which rely on comparisons between measurements on different cruises in the stable deep ocean, could not form the basis for cruise-to-cruise adjustments. For this reason, care was taken in the selection of data sets to include in this initial release of CODAP-NA, and only data sets from laboratories with known quality assurance practices were included. New consistency checks and outlier detections were used to QC the data. Future releases of this CODAP-NA product will use this core data product as the basis for secondary QC. We worked closely with the investigators who collected and measured these data during the QC process. This version of the CODAP-NA is comprised of 3,292 oceanographic profiles from 61 research cruises covering all continental shelves of North America, from Alaska to Mexico in the west and from Canada to the Caribbean in the east. Data for 14 variables (temperature; salinity; dissolved oxygen concentration; dissolved inorganic carbon concentration; total alkalinity; pH on the Total Scale; carbonate ion concentration; fugacity of carbon dioxide; and concentrations of silicate, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, nitrate plus nitrite, and ammonium) have been subjected to extensive QC. CODAP-NA is available as a merged data product (Excel, CSV, MATLAB, and NetCDF, https://doi.org/10.25921/531n-c230https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/data/oceans/ncei/ocads/metadata/0219960.html) (Jiang et al., 2020). The original cruise data have also been updated with data providers’ consent and summarized in a table with links to NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) archives (https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/access/ocean-acidification-data-stewardship-oads/synthesis/NAcruises.html).

Continue reading ‘Coastal Ocean Data Analysis Product in North America (CODAP-NA) – An internally consistent data product for discrete inorganic carbon, oxygen, and nutrients on the U.S. North American ocean margins’

Researchers collaborate to study impact of ocean acidification on Northeast fisheries, develop management tools

A multi-institution team led by UConn researchers is using computer modeling and biological research to help northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

woman looking at a map of scallops off the east coast
(Yesenia Carrero /UConn Illustration)

A multidisciplinary, multi-institution effort is bringing together computer modeling, biological, and social science research to inform management policies for Northeast scallop fisheries facing the threat of ocean acidification.

The $1,034,822 project sponsored by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration’s Ocean Acidification Program includes researchers from the University of Connecticut, NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Commercial Fisheries Research Foundation (CFRF), and Rutgers University.

Continue reading ‘Researchers collaborate to study impact of ocean acidification on Northeast fisheries, develop management tools’

The case for a global ocean carbon observation network

Since 1958, the Global Carbon Budget has tracked anthropogenic CO2 emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and land. Annual budgeting is necessary due to large year-to-year variability in CO2 sources (primarily fossil fuels) and sinks (primarily climate driven). However, uncertainties remain, due to a lack of data, that hinder both research seeking to better understand the global carbon cycle and efforts to independently verify reported CO2 emissions. To refine our understanding of how much atmospheric carbon the planet—and the life it supports—can tolerate, we must significantly increase observational data collection, especially in remote, chronically undersampled regions.

Saildrone proposes a global fleet of unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) for sustained carbon monitoring, supported by a public-private partnership made up of the international science community and private companies developing innovative solutions for ocean observation.

Seeking impact partners

Saildrone proposes a global fleet of 40 vehicles to collect carbon data for sustained monitoring. Saildrone’s USVs are environmentally friendly, using wind power for propulsion and solar power to run the onboard sensors, computers, and satellite and navigation instruments. In addition to carbon data, each Saildrone autonomous vehicle collects nearly two dozen meteorological and oceanographic metrics above and below the sea surface at a frequency of 1 minute or greater.

Continue reading ‘The case for a global ocean carbon observation network’

Princeton project expands to create a worldwide fleet of robotic floats to monitor ocean health

On October 29, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a $53 million grant — shared among a consortium of the country’s top ocean research institutions — to build a global network of chemical and biological sensors that will monitor ocean health.

Scientists at Princeton University, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), University of Washington, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution will use this grant to build and deploy 500 robotic ocean monitoring floats around the globe. The new program builds on the successful Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project based at Princeton that has deployed similar floats in the ocean around Antarctica, proving their usefulness as year-round reporters of ocean chemistry and biological activity.

Continue reading ‘Princeton project expands to create a worldwide fleet of robotic floats to monitor ocean health’

La Parguera (video; in Spanish)

Since 2008 the NOAA’s Ocean Acidification program (OAP) buoy has been installed in La Parguera, Puerto Rico where oceanographic studies of chemistry, biology, geology, and physics of the Caribbean Sea have been conducted for more than 50 years. Below is a video on La Parguera and Ocean Acidification.

Continue reading ‘La Parguera (video; in Spanish)’

Cir#20/84: Pacific Islands survey to assess Pacific members capacity to monitor and study ocean acidification

SPREP is working with the Ocean Foundation and NOAA to develop a new three-year project focused on building capacity to monitor and study ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands.

Attachments

The Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP). Circular.


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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