Archive for the 'Projects' Category

CARIOCA project – coral reef acclimatization to ocean acidification (video; in French and in English)

In the framework of the project CARIOCA (Coral reef acclimatization to ocean acidification at CO2 seeps) funded by the French National Agency ANR, Riccardo Rodolfo-Metalpa and the team IRD Entropie investigated a new promising CO2 vents system located in Papua New Guinea.

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Dem Ozeanwandel auf der Spur BIOACID – Biologische Auswirkungen von Ozeanversauerung (in German)

Als „das andere Kohlendioxid-Problem“, als „böser kleiner Bruder der Erwärmung“ und, zusammen mit Temperaturanstieg und Sauerstoffverlust, als Teileines „tödlichen Trios“ ist die Ozeanversauerung bekannt geworden – eine chemische Veränderung, die ausgelöst wird, wenn sich Kohlendioxid (CO2) aus der Atmosphäre im Meerwasser löst. Einerseits bremst die CO2-Aufnahme den globalen Klimawandel. Andererseits beeinflusst sie das Leben und die Stoffkreisläufe im Ozean – mit Folgen für alle, die von ihm abhängen.

Der deutsche Forschungsverbund BIOACID – Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification (Biologische Auswirkungen von Ozeanversauerung) untersuchte von 2009 bis 2017, wie marine Lebensgemeinschaften auf Ozeanversauerung reagieren und welche Konsequenzen dies für das Nahrungs – netz und die Stoff- und Energieumsätze im Meer sowie schließlich auch für die Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft hat. An dem Projekt, das am GEOMAR Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozean forschung Kiel koordiniert wurde, beteiligten sich mehr als 250 Forschende verschiedener meereswissen – schaftlicher Disziplinen aus 20 deutschen Instituten. Mit rund 580 fachlich begutachteten Publikationen trug BIOACID maßgeblich zum internationalen wissenschaftlichen Diskurs bei. Das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung unter stützte das Projekt über drei Förderphasen mit insgesamt 22 Millionen Euro.

Continue reading ‘Dem Ozeanwandel auf der Spur BIOACID – Biologische Auswirkungen von Ozeanversauerung (in German)’

Exploring ocean change: BIOACID – Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification

“The other carbon dioxide problem”, “the evil twin of global warming”, or part of a “deadly trio”, together with increasing temperatures and loss of oxygen: Many names have been coined to describe the problem of ocean acidification – a change in the ocean chemistry that occurs when carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere dissolves in seawater. On the one hand, the ocean’s CO2 uptake slows down global climate change. On the other, this absorption affects the life and material cycles of the ocean – and all those who depend on it.

Between 2009 and 2017, the German research network BIOACID (Biological Impacts of Ocean Acidification) investigated how different marine species respond to ocean acidification, how these reactions impact the food web as
well as material cycles and energy turnover in the ocean, and what consequences these changes have for economy and society.

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Fourth WESTPAC Workshop on Research and Monitoring of the Ecological Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reef Ecosystems, Phuket, Thailand

The Fourth WESTPAC Workshop on Research and Monitoring of the Ecological Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reef Ecosystems will take place in Phuket, Thailand, on 14–15 December 2017. Hosted by the Phuket Marine Biological Center, this workshop is being planned as a follow-up to the previous three workshops (19-21 January 2015, 26-28 August 2015 and 29-31 August 2016, respectively).

Through the previous three regional workshops, participants shared and reviewed various ocean acidification monitoring and research approaches, methods and techniques; committed themselves to developing a joint long-term programme monitoring the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs in the region. Moreover, ocean acidification pilot sites were identified at the first workshop with a view to analyzing their current monitoring capacity, identifying common monitoring methods, and developing a set of consistent, comparable and cost-effective “Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)” for all pilot sites to monitor the ecological impact of ocean acidification on coral reefs.

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IAEA Brief: Nuclear and isotopic techniques help assess ocean acidification and climate change impacts

SUMMARY
• The factors that determine climate are complex. Oceans store about one quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted through human activities, and play an important role in limiting impacts of climate change.
• Increasing carbon emissions and rising temperatures are disrupting oceanic processes,
with potentially major consequences for marine ecosystems, the global climate, shoreline protection and coastal industries such as fisheries and tourism.
• In order to understand and anticipate potential changes in the climate, it is important to understand the processes involved in the global carbon cycle.
• Increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere cause global warming leading to ocean temperature increase, but also ocean acidification, sometimes referred to as ‘the other CO2 problem’ alongside climate change.
• The IAEA supports Member States in using radioisotopes to understand the ocean carbon cycle and the ways ocean acidification can affect the marine environment and critical ecosystem services.

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2018 OCB Activity solicitation

The Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program is soliciting proposals for OCB activities that will take place during the 2018 calendar year.  OCB seeks proposals for scoping workshops and smaller group activities in OCB-relevant research areas, including ocean acidification.

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Ocean acidification more rapid in coastal oceans

New research under the joint NCCOS Competitive Research Program and NOAA Ocean Acidification Program finds the combined effects of anthropogenic and biological carbon dioxide (CO2) inputs may lead to more rapid acidification in Chesapeake Bay and other coastal water compared to the open ocean. The results indicate that eutrophication can exacerbate ocean acidification (OA) where animal and plant respiration contributes a far greater acidification in the coastal oceans relative to the open ocean.

The study, led by Dr. Wei-Jun Cai of the University of Delaware, is part of a NCCOS-sponsored project team studying interactions between OA and eutrophication in estuaries. “The study shows for the first time that the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide and ammonia from the bottom waters could be a major contributor to lower pH in coastal oceans and may lead to more rapid acidification in coastal waters compared to the open ocean” says Dr. Cai, in the online University of Delaware’s UDaily. Increased acidification can dissolve the calcium carbonate in the shells of valuable clams, oysters, and certain plankton and lead to poor acid buffering capacity of the water.

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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book