Repeated measurement of MO2 in small aquatic organisms: a manual intermittent flow respirometer using off-the-shelf components

Measurement of rates of oxygen consumption (MO2) in small aquatic embryos or larvae (< 1mm) in response to altered environmental conditions has traditionally been challenging. Here, using modifications of a commercially available fluorescent optode flow-through cell (FTC: PreSens{trade mark, serif} FTC-PSt3) and routine laboratory supplies (syringes, stopcocks, tubing), we have constructed a manual intermittent flow respirometer (MIFR) that allows measurement of MO2 in small numbers of individuals when sequentially exposed to different environmental conditions (e.g. changes in seawater pH) through a gravity-driven media replacement perfusion system. We first show that the FTC can be used in ‘static’ mode while incubating small numbers of embryos/larvae contained within the planar oxygen sensor (POS) chamber with Nitex filters. We then demonstrate the use of the MIFR by exposing larval echinoderms (Fellaster zelandiae, Evechinus chloroticus, Centrostephanus rodgersii) to seawater equilibrated with elevated CO2, and measured MO2 during acute and chronic exposure to hypercapnia. This MIFR method will allow investigators to address questions regarding the respiratory physiology of small aquatic animals, such as the thresholds for metabolic depression in embryonic and larval forms.

Baker D. W., Hudson M. E., Frost E. J. & Sewell M. A., in press. Repeated measurement of MO2 in small aquatic organisms: a manual intermittent flow respirometer using off-the-shelf components. Innovative Methodology. Article (subscription required).

0 Responses to “Repeated measurement of MO2 in small aquatic organisms: a manual intermittent flow respirometer using off-the-shelf components”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.




Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,124,583 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book