Long-term alkalinity trends in the Baltic Sea and their implications for CO2-induced acidification

Currently, around 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions are taken up by the oceans (Le Quéré et al., 2015). This mitigates rising atmospheric CO2 levels, but comes at the price of decreasing seawater pH. On multi-millennial time scales intensified continental weathering is expected to contribute to increasing oceanic alkalinity (AT). Because AT neutralizes a large share of the protons that are produced by the dissolution of CO2 in seawater, rising AT concentrations would increase the oceans storage capacity for CO2 and mitigate the acidification signal (Lenton and Britton, 2006). The Baltic Sea is an ideal study site for such AT dynamics, due to its direct link to terrestrial processes, short water residence time and long history of AT measurements dating back to the early 20th century. (…)

Müller J., Schneider B. & Rehder G., 2016. Long-term alkalinity trends in the Baltic Sea and their implications for CO2-induced acidification. In Reckermann M. & Köppen S. (Eds.), Multiple drivers for Earth system changes in the Baltic Sea region, 1st Baltic Earth Conference, International Baltic Earth Secretariat Publication No. 9, June 2016, pp. 46-47. Article.


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