The quiet tsunami: the ecological, economic, social, and political consequences of ocean acidification

A large portion of the carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere is absorbed by the world’s oceans. They become more acidic as they absorb the gas. This has far-reaching implications for the oceanic food web, biodiversity, and the global economy, particularly fishing and ecotourism industries in developing countries. This article briefly outlines the scientific evidence of ocean acidification and the implications of anthropogenic carbon emissions for marine ecosystems. It then assesses the economic, social, and political ramifications of ocean acidification and suggests a new strategy for the promotion of climate change policy. The “quiet tsunami” of oceanic climate change necessitates a policy shift away from the business-as-usual approach to reducing carbon emissions. The high stakes involved in this looming crisis may prompt unwilling governments to act in order to ensure food security and protect key economic markets around the world.



Ciuriak N., 2012. The quiet tsunami: the ecological, economic, social, and political consequences of ocean acidification. Paterson Review of International Affairs 12: 123-143. Article.


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