Experimental approaches to understanding ocean acidification

Session A: June 20 – July 22, 2011 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 19 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 22 after lunch.

Dr. Michael O’Donnell and Dr. Terrie Klinger

As new researchers turn their attention to studying the effects of ocean acidification on a broad range of biological systems they are frequently stymied by the inherent complexities of manipulating and documenting experimental conditions. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills to design and conduct experimental manipulations of biological systems that are consistent with the current state of the field.

This course will consist of three main components.

First, it will serve as a rapid indoctrination into essential topics in geochemistry, de-mystifying this essential piece of ocean acidification research. This module will include lectures on fundamental topics, practical discussions of measuring techniques and equipment and extensive laboratory experience with the critical measurement tools.

Secondly, students will gain experience with a range of techniques for conducting experimental manipulations of environmental conditions. Through lectures, demonstrations, and independent research, students will develop skills to design their own experiments. Students will work with a variety of experimental equipment, including laboratory and in-water mesocosm systems. This module will provide practical exercises for designing experimental systems.

Finally, the course will bring students up-to-date on the rapidly changing state of the field. Lectures, independent readings, and discussions will help the class synthesize a bourgeoning body of research. The ocean acidification literature is growing at an exponential pace, and the focused efforts of the entire class will help bring everyone up to speed on the most relevant papers.

The course will consist of lectures, laboratory exercises and discussions. Students will practice lab skills while documenting the carbonate chemistry of the local waters. During the later part of the course, students will engage in short research projects. However, the emphasis will be primarily on careful experimental design and execution (monitoring and troubleshooting carbonate chemistry manipulations).

Applications are welcome from graduate students at all levels. Potentially, exceptionally qualified undergraduates or postdocs with special interests may also be admitted. This course would be ideal for students at the early stages of designing a research program around ocean acidification. Interested students should contact mooseo@uw.edu or tklinger@uw.edu

Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Apply

2011 Costs (Summer 2011 costs to be posted soon)
Student Information

Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington. More information.


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