Posts Tagged 'webpage'



University of Alaska Fairbanks OARC – Ocean Acidification Research Center

Ocean acidification (OA) is the result of anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide that is later absorbed by the ocean. This change in ocean chemistry makes the global oceans more acidic. Concerns over increasing acidity in Alaska and how this phenomenon will impact Alaska’s Blue Economy spurred the creation of the Ocean Acidification Research Center (OARC) within the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (CFOS) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF).

University of Alaska Fairbanks – College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

The Commonwealth Blue Charter – “Shared ocean, shared values”

The Commonwealth Blue Charter is an agreement by all 54 Commonwealth countries, adopted at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London, April 2018. In the Blue Charter, Commonwealth countries agree to actively cooperate to solve ocean-related problems and meet commitments for sustainable ocean development, with particular emphasis on the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially SDG 14 (Life Below Water).

The Commonwealth Blue Charter. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

MEOPAR – The Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network

The Marine Environmental Observation, Prediction and Response Network (MEOPAR) is a national Network of Centres of Excellence linking top marine researchers and highly qualified personnel across Canada with partner organizations and communities. MEOPAR funds leading-edge research, overcomes barriers to collaborative research and helps to train the next generation of marine professionals.

MEOPAR. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

PML – Plymounth Marine Laboratory

As a charity we aim to develop and apply innovative marine science to ensure a sustainable future for our ocean.
For over 40 years we have provided evidence-based environmental solutions to societal challenges by applying cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research that benefits society and promotes stewardship of marine ecosystems. Since 2002, and in association with a wide range of national and international partners, we have provided these capabilities as an independent company limited by guarantee with charitable status.
The impact of our science is far-reaching ranging from highly cited scientific papers, to providing scientific evidence for policy and training the next generation of marine scientists. Through the delivery of our science plan we are also contributing to UN Sustainable Development Goals to promote healthy, productive and resilient oceans and seas.

PML. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

REMARCO

El mar aumenta su acidez ya que absorbe el 30% del dióxido de carbono (CO2) que produce el ser humano. Este fenómeno limita la disponibilidad y calidad de los alimentos provenientes de los mares y reduce los servicios que estos brindan. Con técnicas avanzadas, los científicos de la red investigan la acidificación de los mares para estudiar y pronosticar sus efectos para apoyar las políticas públicas tendientes a la mitigación y adaptación al cambio climático.

REMARCO – Red de Investigación de Estresores Marinos. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

MBARI, ocean acidification resources

The mission of MBARI is to achieve and maintain a position as a world center for advanced research and education in ocean science and technology, and to do so through the development of better instruments, systems, and methods for scientific research in the deep waters of the ocean. MBARI emphasizes the peer relationship between engineers and scientists as a basic principle of its operation. All of the activities of MBARI must be characterized by excellence, innovation, and vision.

MBARI – Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

GOA-ON – Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network

GOA-ON is a collaborative international network to detect and understand the drivers of ocean acidification in estuarine-coastal-open ocean environments, the resulting impacts on marine ecosystems, and to make the information available to optimize modelling studies. The network is fundamental to providing early warning of the impacts of ocean acidification on natural ecosystems, wild and aquaculture fisheries, coastal protection, tourism and local economies. The network provides key input to communities, industry and governments seeking to develop action plans, best practices, and mitigation or adaptation strategies to address ocean acidification impacts.

GOA-ON. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

AWI – Alfred Wegener Institut

As a Helmholtz centre for polar and marine research the Alfred Wegener Institute works above all in the cold and temperate regions of the world. Together with numerous national and international partners we are involved to decipher the complicated processes in the “system of earth”. Our planet is in a radical climate change. The pole areas and seas change. At the same time they play a central role in the global climate system. How does the planet earth develop? Do we observe short-term variations or long-term trends? Polar and marine research has always been a fascinating scientific challenge. Today it is also a piece of futurology.

AWI – Alfred Wegener Institut, 28 April 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

OAIE – Ocean Acidification Information Exchange

The Ocean Acidification Information Exchange is an online community for professionals involved with or interested in the topics of ocean and coastal acidification (OCA). Our mission is to respond and adapt to OCA by fostering an online environment built on trust, where our members feel empowered to ask, answer, and learn from one another.

OAIE. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

What you need to know about ocean acidification

Carbon pollution isn’t just warming the climate it’s also making our oceans more acidic. NRDC scientist Lisa Suatoni explains why we must pay attention.

Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), 13 August 2015. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

In the 200-plus years since the industrial revolution began, the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased due to human actions. During this time, the pH of surface ocean waters has fallen by 0.1 pH units. This might not sound like much, but the pH scale is logarithmic, so this change represents approximately a 30 percent increase in acidity.

NOAA, 01 April 2020. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Ocean acidification: Smithsonian Institution

Ocean acidification is sometimes called climate change’s equally evil twin, and for good reason: it’s a significant and harmful consequence of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that we don’t see or feel because its effects are happening underwater. At least one-quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) released by burning coal, oil and gas doesn’t stay in the air, but instead dissolves into the ocean. Since the beginning of the industrial era, the ocean has absorbed some 525 billion tons of CO2 from the atmosphere, presently around 22 million tons per day.

Smithsonian Institution, 01 April 2018. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

NOAA Ocean Acidification Program

NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program seeks to better prepare society to respond to changing ocean conditions and resources by expanding understanding of ocean acidification, through interdisciplinary partnerships, nationally and internationally. Ocean acidification is occurring because our ocean is absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, leading to lower pH and greater acidity. This is causing a fundamental change in the chemistry of the ocean from pole to pole.

NOAA – OAP. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

NOAA PMEL Carbon Program

To understand the changing chemistry of the oceans and the impacts of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems. Our observations of key physical, chemical, and biological parameters support NOAA’s overall efforts to predict how marine ecosystems will respond and to develop management strategies for adapting to the consequences of ocean acidification.

NOAA – PMEL Carbom Program. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Ocean Acidification Canadian Community of Practice

The Ocean Acidification Community of Practice is an interdisciplinary group dedicated to sharing information and resources related to ocean acidification. We strive to provide a space for discussion and co-production of ocean acidification knowledge across Canada. Our members consist of individuals from government, aquaculture, fisheries, academia, and Indigenous community leadership, as well as students and members of the public.

Ocean Acidification Canadian Community of Practice. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Visualizing ocean acidification: new online resource (UNESCO)

New online features were launched to bring together the latest ocean acidification infographics, publications, background information, presentations and news for researchers, policymakers and the public.

This website was created to raise awareness, present the phenomenon introduce the challenged related to Ocean Acidification by several pioneering institutions that are working together to increase the knowledge-base and facilitate international cooperation in this field. The website was developed by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC-UNESCO), the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP), the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) and the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Center (OA-ICC) operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)’s Environmental Laboratories in Monaco.

UNESCO, 23 July 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Welcome to the SDG 14.3.1 data portal

This SDG 14.3.1 Data Portal is a tool for the submission, collection, validation, storage and sharing of ocean acidification data and metadata submitted towards the Sustainable Development Goal 14.3.1 Indicator: average marine acidity (pH) measured at agreed suite of representative sampling stations.

IO-UNESCO. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

Indicator assessment: ocean acidification

Currently, the ocean takes up about one quarter of global CO2 emissions from human activities. The uptake of CO2 in the sea causes ocean acidification, as the pH of sea water declines.
Ocean surface pH declined from 8.2 to below 8.1 over the industrial era as a result of an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This decline corresponds to an increase in oceanic acidity of about 30 %.

European Environment Agency, 25 June 2021. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

The OA Alliance

With a membership representing nearly 300 million people and 366,414 kilometres of coastline, the OA Alliance brings together governments and organizations from across the globe dedicated to taking urgent action to protect coastal communities and livelihoods from the threat of ocean acidification and other climate-ocean impacts.

OA Alliance. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage

IUCN: ocean acidification

The oceans have absorbed between 24% and 33% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions during the past five decades. While this uptake provides a valuable service to human societies by moderating the rate and severity of climate change, it comes at a cost for the oceans. The massive input of CO2 generates sweeping changes in the chemistry of seawater, especially on the carbonate system. These changes are collectively referred to as “ocean acidification” because increased CO2 lowers seawater pH (i.e. increases its acidity).

IUCN – International Union for Conservation of Nature. Resource.

Resource type: website

Resource format: webpage


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