Alkalinity in the Gulf of Maine (and beyond); new observations, insights, and opportunities (webinar video)

Ocean Acidification (OA) is a complex challenge in coastal waters, affecting a variety of groups across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels drive the acidification process from one side, while changing river inputs and coastal circulation patterns provide pressures from another side. Caught in the middle are some of the most sensitive, economically valuable and highly populated areas of the world. Seawater is chemically buffered against acidification; however, this buffering is not evenly distributed around our coasts. Measurement of the buffering capacity, known as alkalinity, has been routine in open-ocean studies for decades, but have been limited in more dynamic coastal settings until relatively recently. Through several projects researchers at UNH, along with colleagues from other institutions, have been working to collect large amounts of alkalinity data in the Gulf of Maine and other regions, using both standard methods and new technology. Chris will discuss how these new in-situ data compare to regional alkalinity estimates and detail how new technology and observation opportunities can improve OA and carbon cycle science.

Northeast Coastal Acidification Network, 14 November 2018. Webinar.


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