The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) enters its twentyfifth year of ocean observations in the North Atlantic that illustrate changes in ocean carbon

The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS; 31°40’N, 64°10’W) project has entered its twenty-fifth year of ocean time-series observations in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean southeast of Bermuda (Fig. 1). This milestone in ocean observation is shared with its sister time-series off Hawaii (Hawaii Ocean Time-series; HOT or station ALOHA; A Long-term Oligotrophic Habitat Assessment; 22°45’N, 158°00’W); with both ocean time-series providing a wealth of hydrographic and biogeochemical data that have been used to examine, test, and refine many oceanographic paradigms and hypotheses. Since the inception of the BATS project in 1988, more than 450 peer-reviewed journal articles, numerous book chapters, and other documents have been published using BATS data. In this article, we briefly review the history of the time-series, and the types of sampling and data this oceanographic time-series continues to generate.

The BATS project benefits from synergies and connectivity with complementary ocean time-series off Bermuda, including Hydrostation S (32°10′, 64°30’W; started in 1954 by Hank Stommel of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and continued at BIOS), the Ocean Flux Program (OFP; started in 1978 by Dr. Werner Deuser and continued today by Dr. Maureen Conte), and associated projects that have used BATS as the context for improving scientific understanding of ocean chemistry and biogeochemistry. “The sum is greater than the individual parts” is an apt phrase for this nexus of scientific time-series endeavors. Secondly, we focus on the longterm changes in the inorganic carbon cycle in the North Atlantic Ocean off Bermuda, its importance for understanding the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) by the ocean, and the impact of ocean acidification on seawater CO2-carbonate chemistry.

Bates N. R., Lomas M. W. & Johnson R. J., 2013. The Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) enters its twentyfifth year of ocean observations in the North Atlantic that illustrate changes in ocean carbon. OCB News, Spring/Summer 2013, pp. 7-10. Full article.


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