EPOCA, the first international project on ocean acidification came to an end

Ocean acidity has increased by 30% in the past 250 years and could increase by at least another 100% by the end of this century. This phenomenon, known as “ocean acidification”, is due to the uptake of 25% of the human-produced CO2 by the ocean (about 24 millions tons CO2 every day). While this uptake help to mitigate climate change, ocean acidification threatens marine biodiversity and could affect economically important marine resources, including fish, shellfish and coral reefs.

During the four years between 2008 and 2012, more than 160 European scientists from 32 laboratories came together to collaborate around this research topic. The European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA), coordinated by the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), was launched in May 2008 and brought together participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. More than 170 papers investigating the consequences of increasing CO2 emissions on marine organisms and ecosystems were produced during the life time of the project.

Gattuso J.-P. & Hansson L., 2013. EPOCA, the first international project on ocean acidification came to an end. IOCCP Conveyor 6-8. Article.


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