Effects of ocean acidification on the marine source of atmospherically active trace gases

Marine trace gases, including dimethyl sulphide (DMS) and organohalogens, are a vital component of the Earth-climate system. They are formed in the surface oceans via biological and photochemical processes, and flux to the atmosphere. Here they play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. Consequently, changes in the net production rate and sea-to-air flux of marine trace gases as a result of ocean acidification could affect globally important processes. Results from mesocosm experiments performed in Norwegian coastal waters suggest that DMS and organohalogen production may be significantly affected by high-CO2. However, the data is limited to a small number of studies, and displays some inconsistencies. Furthermore, there is a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed responses. Finally, only DMS and organohalogens have been considered so far – a small representation of a variety of important gases produced in the surface oceans.

Hopkins F., Nightingale P., & Peter L., 2011. Effects of ocean acidification on the marine source of atmospherically active trace gases. In: Gattuso J.-P. & Hansson L. (Eds.), Ocean acidification, pp. 210-229. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Book.


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