NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco and Senior NOAA Climate Scientists Contribute to COP-15 Conference

Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D ., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator, will be in Copenhagen as part of the U.S. Delegation from Dec. 13-16. As a member of the president’s science team and head of NOAA, Lubchenco is one of the senior administration officials attending the conference, including President Barack Obama and Commerce Secretary Gary Locke. Many of the leading federal climate scientists work within NOAA.

NOAA will play a major supporting role in the U.S. Center. Along with other U.S. scientists and senior administration officials, NOAA scientists will explore the United State’s efforts both domestically and internationally to research, understand and provide tools to respond to the impacts of a changing climate.

The centerpiece of the U.S. Center exhibit space is NOAA’s “Science On a Sphere,” a large globe that displays a wide range of climate, weather and other spatial data around the Earth. On Dec. 8, NOAA’s Sandy MacDonald, Ph.D ., will conduct a climate change “spherecast” from Copenhagen that will be viewed live on spheres in select science centers around the world.



NOAA scientists and Department of Commerce officials will also blog and hold web chats from Copenhagen. Lubchenco will also be posting updates and information about COP-15 activities on her Facebook page.

Daily updates from NOAA and the Department of Commerce at will be available on: http://www.commerce.gov/cop15. The State Department Web site has the full program of events: http://www.cop15.state.gov.

This year the events at the conference will be more widely accessible than ever before. The following NOAA presentations will be webcast at https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/uscenter. All times are listed in EST:

Monday, Dec. 7, 3:00 a.m. Arctic: One of the Earth’s Most Rapidly Warming Regions, presented by James Overland, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Monday, Dec. 7, 9:30 a.m. The History and Science of Monitoring Carbon Dioxide and Other Greenhouse Gases, presented by Sandy MacDonald, NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory
Monday, Dec. 7, 5:30 a.m. Ocean Acidification: Impacts of Carbon Dioxide on Marine Ecosystems, presented by Oceana and Richard Feely, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Tuesday, Dec. 8, 9:30 a.m. Global Climate Change Impacts in the U.S ., presented by Tom Karl, NOAA National Climatic Data Center
Tuesday, Dec. 8, 12:00 p.m. Extreme Weather and Climate Events in a Changing Climate, presented by Tom Karl, NOAA National Climatic Data Center
Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1:00 p.m. Climate Change Science on a Sphere, presented by Sandy MacDonald, NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory
Wednesday, Dec. 9, 12:00 p.m. The Critical Role of Climate Literacy in addressing Climate Change, presented by Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Program Office
Thursday, Dec. 10, 10:15 a.m. Climate Change Toolkit: Wildlife and Wildlands Videoconference, presented by EPA and Peg Steffen, NOAA National Ocean Service
Monday, Dec. 14, 4:15 a.m. Climate Services: Providing the Information that People Need for a Changing World, presented by Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Administrator
Monday, Dec. 14 7:00 a.m. Clim’City: An Interactive Informal Educational Network, presented by Ned Gardiner, NOAA Climate Program Office
Tuesday, Dec. 15, 4:15 a.m. Oceans and Ecosystems in a Changing Climate, presented by Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Administrator
NOAA understands and predicts changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and conserves and manages our coastal and marine resources.

Jennifer Austin, 7th Space, 8 December 2009. Article.

1 Response to “NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco and Senior NOAA Climate Scientists Contribute to COP-15 Conference”


  1. 1 John Porter 19 December 2009 at 00:23

    I have read many news articles concerning the acidic affects as a result of Climate Change and I agree with that; however, my concern is the effects of a warming ocean. I am not certain at what temperature the oceans stop being a sink for CO2 but it has been pointed out in “Thermodynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans,” by Judith A. Curry and Peter J. Webster, ISBN: 0-12-199570-4, P118/119 that; “equilibrium concentrations of atmospheric gases in seawater generally decrease with increasing temperature.”
    In light of the East Anglia revolutions I get concerned now when I see something that the general public might not understand, such as the ocean becoming a possible emitter (Gas hydrates) rather than a sink with a warming atmosphere.


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