Seminar series on ocean acidification impacts at the Gordon Research Conference: “Understanding the Biological Consequences of Global Ocean Change: Insights from Environmental History”, 16-17 July 2016, Waterville Valley, NH , USA

Abstract submissions are still accepted for the Gordon Research Seminar associated with the Global Ocean Change Biology Gordon Research Conference. The seminar will be held on July 16-17 in Waterville Valley, NH and is open to graduate students, post-docs and early career scientists.

The seminar series will be chaired by Emily B. Rivest from the University of California (ebrivest(at)ucdavis.edu) and Christopher E. Cornwall from the University of Western Australia.

The seminar series will feature approximately 10 talks and 2 poster sessions. All attendees are expected to actively participate in the GRS either by giving an oral presentation or presenting a poster. Therefore, all applications must include an abstract.

The Chairs will select speakers from abstracts submitted by 16 April 2016. Those applicants who are not chosen for talks and those who apply after the deadline to be considered for an oral presentation will be expected to present a poster. Although applications for the Gordon Research Conference are accepted until 18 June 2016, any applicants who wish to be considered for an oral presentation should submit their application by 16 April 2016.

Please note: Although applications for the Gordon Research Conference are generally accepted by 18 June 2016, any applicants who wish to be considered for an oral presentation should submit their application by 16 April 2016.

The focus of this seminar series is to bring together our understanding about how the environmental history of a population or individual influences tolerance or vulnerability to future environmental change and thus the ability for marine species to cope with the multi-stressor scenario of global ocean change. Organizers are interested in studies that span a wide range of time scales (from carryover effects within an individual’s lifetime to transgenerational plasticity to population level timescales to pale oceanographic time scales), and are also looking to highlight interdisciplinary tools for linking environmental exposure to organismal performance.

Further information.

 

 

 


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