Meeting: “The Effects of Ocean Acidification on Predator-Prey Interactions: A Kinematic Approach”, Oregon Convetion Centre, 18 August 2015

Date & time: Tuesday, 18 August 2015, 2:40 PM
Location: 145th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society (16-20 August 2015), E-145, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon

Panel:

  • Bridie Allan , College of Marine and Environmental Science, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
  • Mark McCormick , College of Marine and Environmental Science, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
  • Paolo Domenici , CNR IAMC
  • Gabrielle Miller , College of Marine and Environmental Science, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
  • Philip Munday , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia

Studies suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 affects how fish perceive their environment, affecting behaviourial and cognitive processes leading to increased prey mortality. However, it is unclear what is driving this increase in mortality. We demonstrate that the kinematic interactions between a common predator and its prey (the damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis and the dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus) are sensitive to elevated CO2. Specifically, we observed differential changes in both the predator and the preys’ responses to each other, leading to changes in the survival of the prey. This suggests that the dynamics of predator-prey interactions under future CO2 environments will depend on the extent to which the interacting species are affected. We also asked whether the acute effects of elevated CO2 on the escape performance of juvenile reef fish could be ameliorated if the parents had been exposed similarly. Elevated CO2 negatively affected the escape performance of juvenile fish, but parental exposure to high CO2 reduced the effects in some traits, indicating the potential for acclimation of behavioural impairment across generations. However, acclimation was not complete in some traits, and absent in others, suggesting that transgenerational acclimation does not completely compensate the effects of elevated CO2 on escape responses.

More information.


  • Reset

Subscribe

OA-ICC Highlights


%d bloggers like this: