2010 Goldschmidt Conference session on “Novel Approaches to Understand the Biological Pump of the Oceans at Present and in Future Climate Change Scenarios: Higher Trophic Level Contributions, Additional Sources and Fluxes, and Innovative Measuring Procedures”

We would like to invite you to submit an abstract to the session: “Novel Approaches to Understand the Biological Pump of the Oceans at Present and in Future Climate Change Scenarios: Higher Trophic Level Contributions, Additional Sources and Fluxes, and Innovative Measuring Procedures” at the 2010 Goldschmidt Conference. The meeting will take place between June 13 – 18 in Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S. If you wish to submit an abstract please contact Mario Lebrato (mlebrato@ifm-geomar.de ) or M. Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez (dir@noc.soton.ac.uk ).



The abstract and registration/campus accommodation forms are now live (www.goldschmidt2010.org).
There are over 170 sessions divided into 22 themes – see http://www.goldschmidt2010.org/themes
for a list of sessions and keynote speakers. Please see session description and meeting information below.

Meeting web page: www.goldschmidt2010.org

Abstract deadline: February 21

Early registration deadline: April 16.

“Novel Approaches to Understand the Biological Pump of the Oceans at Present and in Future Climate Change Scenarios: Higher Trophic Level Contributions, Additional Sources and Fluxes, and Innovative Measuring Procedures”

Convenors: Mario Lebrato, M. Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez.

Keynote: Robert H Condon (Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences).

Studies of the biological pump primarily focus on processes associated with phytoplankton, its remineralization as it sinks through the water column, and its fate at the seabed. This can result in a misunderstanding of the global marine carbon cycle and inaccuracies in global biogeochemical models because other taxa contribute to the functioning of the biological pump. This session calls for new ways to study and understand the biological pump of the oceans (from modeling and an observationalist perspectives) by addressing any process in the water column that takes carbon and other elements to depth. We call for papers that provide new insights into benthic processes that contribute to the carbon flux that are not included in the carbon export models.
The session will also explore new measurement approaches for quantifying the strength of the biological pump. We encourage abstracts on processes that can affect the strength of the biological pump at regional and global levels that may include ocean acidification, global warming, or a combination of the two.


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