Carbon cycling and acidification session at the 2010 International Polar Year meeting

A carbon cycling and acidification session will be organized at the 2010 International Polar Year meeting in Oslo, Norway (8-12 June 2010):

Session T1-6: Arctic and Antarctic marine chemistry: The role of the polar oceans in global carbon cycling and acidification



Please find a short session description below, and feel free to distribute this email broadly.

For more information about the conference please visit the web site: http://www.ipy-osc.no/

Abstract submission deadline: 20 January 2010.

We hope you will consider submitting an abstract!

Regards,
Nick Bates & Nikki Lovenduski

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T1-6: Arctic and Antarctic marine chemistry: The role of the polar oceans in global carbon cycling and acidification

The polar oceans are believed to play a critical role in the global uptake and transport of carbon dioxide (CO2), and are currently experiencing significant climate change. Recent acceleration in the loss of Arctic sea ice has been shown to boost marine primary production
and increase the Arctic Ocean sink for atmospheric CO2. Meanwhile, an increase in the intensity of the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitude westerly winds has been linked to a weakening of the Southern Ocean CO2 sink. Furthermore, anthropogenic ocean acidification and climate-related changes have lowered the aragonite saturation state in polar oceans and are likely to create conditions detrimental to high-latitude ecosystems over the next century. It is critical to understand how the polar oceans are responding to climate change and to predict how their carbon chemistry will evolve under increased greenhouse gas forcing. This session will provide a venue to present and discuss recent advances and discoveries in the carbon cycling of polar oceans, the impact of climate change on carbon uptake and transport in these regions, and the implications of these findings for marine calcifying organisms. We welcome studies on all aspects of carbon cycling and acidification in the polar oceans and seas.

Conveners:
Nick Bates, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, nick.bates(at)bios.edu
Nikki Lovenduski, University of Colorado at Boulder, nicole.lovenduski(at)colorado.edu


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