Posts Tagged 'birds'

Potential for cumulative effects of human stressors on fish, sea birds and marine mammals in Arctic waters

We estimate the potential for cumulative impacts from multiple anthropogenic stressors on fish, sea birds, and marine mammals in the western, southern and south-eastern parts of marine waters around Greenland. The analysis is based on a comprehensive data set representing five human activities including two proxies for climate change, as well as 25 key animal species including commercially important fish and top predators such as sea birds and marine mammals. Anthropogenic stressors are concentrated in two areas: the offshore waters south of Greenland, and especially the western coast from the Qeqertarsuaq (Disko Island) area to the southern tip of Greenland. The latter is also an area of high importance for many key species, thus the potential for cumulative impacts is high along Greenland’s west coast. We conclude that this area should be under high scientific scrutiny and conservation attention. Our study is a first attempt and a stepping-stone towards more detailed and accurate estimates of the effects of multiple human stressors on Arctic marine ecosystems.

Continue reading ‘Potential for cumulative effects of human stressors on fish, sea birds and marine mammals in Arctic waters’

Exploring the potential effects of climate change on the Western Scotian Shelf ecosystem, Canada

Climate change is expected to cause profound changes in marine ecosystems that will vary in magnitude and effect among regions. We explore the potential effects of climate change on the western Scotian Shelf ecosystem in eastern Canada using an ecosystem model and two scenarios of climatic changes. The model includes the effects of temperature, pH, oxygen, decreased primary productivity and change in zooplankton size structure. These factors had differential, and sometimes opposing additive effects on the functional groups and species. The results also illustrate how the effects of climate change can be further enhanced or ameliorated by predator-prey interactions. At the individual species or functional group level, some effects were negligible, but at the ecosystem level, the combined predicted effect of climate change on the western Scotian shelf led to a reduction in biomass of 19% to 29% with an associated decrease in catches of 20% and 22%. Dramatic declines in biomass due to climate drivers could be alleviated in part by a 50% decrease in exploitation rate.
Continue reading ‘Exploring the potential effects of climate change on the Western Scotian Shelf ecosystem, Canada’

A horizon scanning assessment of current and potential future threats to migratory shorebirds

We review the conservation issues facing migratory shorebird populations that breed in temperate regions and use wetlands in the non-breeding season. Shorebirds are excellent model organisms for understanding ecological, behavioural and evolutionary processes and are often used as indicators of wetland health. A global team of experienced shorebird researchers identified 45 issues facing these shorebird populations, and divided them into three categories (natural, current anthropogenic and future issues). The natural issues included megatsunamis, volcanoes and regional climate changes, while current anthropogenic threats encompassed agricultural intensification, conversion of tidal flats and coastal wetlands by human infrastructure developments and eutrophication of coastal systems. Possible future threats to shorebirds include microplastics, new means of recreation and infectious diseases. We suggest that this review process be broadened to other taxa to aid the identification and ranking of current and future conservation actions.

Continue reading ‘A horizon scanning assessment of current and potential future threats to migratory shorebirds’


Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,278,517 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book