Archive for the 'Presentations' Category

Webinar: Gene regulatory response to end-century temperature and pCO2 in post-larval American lobster

When: Wednesday October 9, 2019 at 1:00 PM ET

Presented by Richard Wahle, PhD. and Maura Niemisto of the University of Maine

Anthropogenic carbon released into the atmosphere is driving rapid, concurrent increases in temperature and acidity across the world’s oceans, most prominently in northern latitudes. The geographic range of the iconic American lobster (Homarus americanus) spans a steep thermal gradient and one of the most rapidly warming ocean environments. Understanding the interactive effects of ocean warming and acidification on this species’ vulnerable early life stages is important to predict its response to climate change on a life stage-specific and population level. This study investigated the interactive effects of ocean warming and acidification on the gene expression response of the planktonic post-larval lobster from southern New England. Using a full factorial experimental design, lobsters were raised in ambient and elevated pCO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 1200 ppm) and temperatures (16°C and 19°C). Overall, we identified 1,108 transcripts that were differentially expressed across treatments, several of which were related to stress response and shell formation. When temperature alone was elevated (19°C), larvae downregulated genes related to cuticle development; when pCO2 alone was elevated (1200 ppm), larvae upregulated chitinase as well as genes related to stress response and immune function. The joint effects of end-century stressors (19°C, 1200 ppm) resulted in the upregulation of those same genes, as well as cellulase, and the downregulation of calcified cuticle proteins, and a greater upregulation in genes tied to immune response and functioning. These first results of the impact of varying conditions on larval lobster gene expression suggest the existence of mechanisms to respond to stressors resulting from a rapidly changing environment.

Continue reading ‘Webinar: Gene regulatory response to end-century temperature and pCO2 in post-larval American lobster’

Webinar: pH measurements for acidification studies: what to do with available data and methods

When: 4th October Time: 16:00 (GMT)

Oceanographer with doctoral studies in Coastal Oceanography at the School of Marine Sciences of the Autonomous University of Baja California and postdoctoral fellow at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California. Dr. Hernandez is a specialist in Carbon Dioxide System in seawater and marine biogeochemistry. His research has focused on studying the role of coastal zones in the carbon cycle, including the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on marine ecosystems and its relationship with other stress factors such as hypoxia, climate change and CO2 flows in coastal regions. Dr Hernández-Ayón is a member of the IMECOCAL (Mexican Research of California Current) scientific committee and of the GOA-ON Executive Council. He is a representative of the Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) group in Mexico, serves as Coordinator of the Mexican Carbon Program (PMC), and is the Co-Chair of the Latin American Ocean Acidification Studies Network (LAOCA).

Continue reading ‘Webinar: pH measurements for acidification studies: what to do with available data and methods’

Webinar: “We’ve got chemistry! Leveraging partnerships and the ocean acidification information exchange to advance ocean acidification and MPA science”

Marine protected areas (MPAs), sanctuaries, and reserves offer refuge to a wide variety of marine species, but can they also protect vulnerable organisms from the effects of ocean acidification (OA) and other climate-related stressors? Increasingly, OA scientists and MPA managers are working together to explore questions of adaptability in marine protected areas to explore this question and sharing their ideas on a dynamic new online platform called the OA Information Exchange (OAIE). In this webinar, we will: 1) provide an orientation to the OAIE to the MPA community and other new users, 2) describe how innovative collaborations between researchers and volunteer scientists are advancing both OA and MPA science in the Oregon Marine Reserves, and 3) provide examples of efforts to document changing ocean conditions and understand potential impacts of ecosystem change in Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including how the development of a sentinel site for ocean acidification on the Olympic Coast supports OA coordination and collaboration in Washington.

Continue reading ‘Webinar: “We’ve got chemistry! Leveraging partnerships and the ocean acidification information exchange to advance ocean acidification and MPA science”’

Upcoming webinar from the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification: Unveiling OA Action Plans

Time: 14 August, 11:00am Pacific Standard Time

Description: OA Alliance Members will provide an overview of process and content for creating their government lead OA Action Plans, including the tangible actions they are taking to respond to the threat of ocean acidification.

With presentations from:
New Zealand OA Community
Government of the Netherlands
State of Oregon
City of Vancouver, Canada
Makah Tribe

Continue reading ‘Upcoming webinar from the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification: Unveiling OA Action Plans’

Webinar recording available online: Communities of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification, 12 June 2019

The Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification held its third webinar on 12 June 2019. Dr Libby Jewett, Director of NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program and previous co-chair of the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network, GOA-ON, (VC16542) made a presentation on GOA-ON status, progress and lessons learned.

Continue reading ‘Webinar recording available online: Communities of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification, 12 June 2019’

Alkalinity in the Gulf of Maine (and beyond); new observations, insights, and opportunities (webinar video)

Ocean Acidification (OA) is a complex challenge in coastal waters, affecting a variety of groups across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels drive the acidification process from one side, while changing river inputs and coastal circulation patterns provide pressures from another side. Caught in the middle are some of the most sensitive, economically valuable and highly populated areas of the world. Seawater is chemically buffered against acidification; however, this buffering is not evenly distributed around our coasts. Measurement of the buffering capacity, known as alkalinity, has been routine in open-ocean studies for decades, but have been limited in more dynamic coastal settings until relatively recently. Through several projects researchers at UNH, along with colleagues from other institutions, have been working to collect large amounts of alkalinity data in the Gulf of Maine and other regions, using both standard methods and new technology. Chris will discuss how these new in-situ data compare to regional alkalinity estimates and detail how new technology and observation opportunities can improve OA and carbon cycle science.

Continue reading ‘Alkalinity in the Gulf of Maine (and beyond); new observations, insights, and opportunities (webinar video)’

Training video: Ocean carbon crisis

Continue reading ‘Training video: Ocean carbon crisis’


Subscribe to the RSS feed

Powered by FeedBurner

Follow AnneMarin on Twitter

Blog Stats

  • 1,290,929 hits

OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book