Archive for the 'Presentations' Category

Measuring OA to support the 2030 agenda for sustainable development: GOA-ON webinar 2 (text & video)

GOA-ON

This presentation will introduce the audience to the Sustainable Development GOAL 14 and in particular the SDG target 14.3 and its indicator 14.3.1 focusing on ocean acidification. It will introduce the related methodology, related meta-data and data requirements, what kind of data to submit and where. We will show how international collaboration can, and already has, increased scientific capacity and how continued efforts will hopefully help to reduce the negative impacts on ocean health.

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NOAA live! Webinar 69 – it’s not easy being shelled: the ocean acidification blues (text & video)


Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Excess carbon dioxide (CO2) isn’t just warming the planet; it’s also reacting with seawater and making the oceans more corrosive—a process known as ocean acidification. This slight increase in acidity doesn’t change the way the ocean looks or feels to us—but it’s a big deal for marine species with hard parts made of calcium carbonate, like pteropods, whose delicate shells begin to dissolve when exposed to acidified seawater. Meg Chadsey will demonstrate how ocean acidification is stressing her favorite local shellfish species—oysters—and explain why some shellfish farmers are turning to kelp for help. The webinar lasts about 45 minutes with moderated questions and answers throughout. Aimed at grades 2-8, but all ages will enjoy. (Recorded on February 10, 2021) Meg Chadsey, NOAA’s Washington Sea Grant and the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle, WA **American Sign Language was provided live via a video remote interpreter during the webinar.

#NOAALive4Kids#SeaGrantSTEM

Continue reading ‘NOAA live! Webinar 69 – it’s not easy being shelled: the ocean acidification blues (text & video)’

Turning up the lights: ocean acidification may increase light intensity of secretory bioluminescent signaling (text & video)

Video created by Tom Iwanicki, PhD Candidate at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa, presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in January 2021 through February 2021. These data are unpublished.

Synopsis: Approximately 75% of pelagic organisms are capable of bioluminescence. Under the IPCC worst-case scenario (RCP8.5), the average ocean pH will decrease from its pre-industrial average of 8.2 to 7.7 by the end of the 21st century. Under these conditions, bioluminescent systems may be affected by this change in the reaction medium (ocean water). This meta-analysis surveyed previously published research and found 49 records including bioluminescent intensity and pH for a wide range of taxa. These data suggest the direction and magnitude of an ocean acidification effect is taxa-specific.

Continue reading ‘Turning up the lights: ocean acidification may increase light intensity of secretory bioluminescent signaling (text & video)’

Ocean acidification and the behaviour of marine fishes

Thursday 17th DECEMBER 10:00-11:00hrs (AEST)

Professor Philip Munday

Abstract: 

It is a little over a decade since research commenced into the effects of anthropogenic ocean acidification on marine fishes. In that time, we have learned that projected end-of-century CO2 levels can affect the physiology, growth and survival of some species, but not others. There are also wide-ranging effects on behaviour that could alter the performance and survivorship of some species. However, these effects are context and species specific, and the results depend on how experiments are done. In a provocative article published in Nature, Clark et al. claimed that ocean acidification does not impair the behaviour of coral reef fishes and that previous studies are not repeatable. In this talk I outline the overwhelming evidence from a decade of research showing that elevated CO2 can affect the behaviour of a wide variety of fishes, including coral reef fishes, and I describe how methodological differences explain why different studies yield different results. I conclude by considering the possible effects of ocean acidification on reef fishes compared with other, more immediate, threats from climate change.

Biography:

Professor Philip Munday is a Chief Investigator and Reef Research Leader in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University in Townsville. He has broad interests in the ecology and evolution of reef fishes. His primary research focuses on predicting the impacts that climate change and ocean acidification will have on populations and communities of marine fishes, both directly through changes in the physical environment and indirectly through effects on coral reef habitat. Using a range of laboratory and field-based experiments the research group he leads is investigating the effects of climate change on fish populations and testing their capacity for acclimation and adaptation to a rapidly changing environment.

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Ocean acidification on the Great Barrier Reef: the future is now- Dr. Katharina Fabricius (video and text)

Ocean acidification, the increase in seawater CO2 with all its associated consequences, is relatively well understood in open oceans. In shelf seas such as the Great Barrier Reef, processes are much less understood, due to complex interactions with water quality and biological processes. I will show new data how ocean acidification has been progressing in the Great Barrier Reef, and its direct and indirect effects on coral reefs of the GBR, including shifts from corals to seaweed, impaired coral recruitment, and increasing bioerosion. Our new data from the Great Barrier Reef suggest that functional changes are already occurring, measurably affecting coralline algae, and coral recruitment and promoting macroalgae. Although most reefs are still net accreting, some reefs in marginal locations and high latitudes have started to dissolve in winter. The future integrity of GBR reefs under increasing ocean acidification will depend on their specific biophysical properties, and effective mitigation of the cumulative stressors from nutrient pollution. Unlike a clean-up of water quality, OA is irreversible on time scales of thousands of years, and there is no latitudinal escape, re-emphasising the imperative for rapid action on atmospheric CO2 pollution. Biography: Dr Katharina Fabricius is a Senior Principal Research Scientist, and leader of the Team ‘Cumulative Impacts’ at the Australian Institute of Marine Science. She has spent over 30 years actively researching coral reefs, and has received her PhD from the University of Munich in 1995 for her work on soft corals the Great Barrier Reef, the Red Sea and reefs in Florida. A major focus of her research is to understand the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on ecological processes in coral reefs. She has spent ten years investigating the effects of ocean acidification on reefs using volcanic CO2 seeps in Papua New Guinea as a natural laboratory. Her present focus is now on understanding the consequences of ocean acidification and poor water on the capacity of GBR reefs to recover. Katharina has published over 165 journal articles and book chapters, and holds advisory roles as coral reef expert on ocean acidification, water quality and climate change issues, and is still fascinated by soft corals.

Continue reading ‘Ocean acidification on the Great Barrier Reef: the future is now- Dr. Katharina Fabricius (video and text)’

Coastal acidification adaption and mitigation strategies, webinars

Ocean and coastal acidification (OCA) threatens marine ecosystems and the coastal communities that rely on them. Actions and best practices to adapt to and mitigate impacts of OCA, such as buffering sediments, restoring seagrasses and conserving refugia is an area of active research. Hear from five speakers about strategies to mitigate impacts of OCA on coral reefs and shellfish resources.

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IGS global seminar series: glacial water impacts on the chemical characteristics of sea ice and seawater and ocean acidification in Svalbard Fjords

Speaking: Agneta Fransson, Norwegian Polar Institute, Oslo, Norway

Event Type: Webinars and Virtual Events

When: 9 December 2020

Where: Online: 12:00 pm AKST, 4:00 pm EST

Summary
International Glaciological Society Global Seminar:

Speaking: Agneta Fransson, Norwegian Polar Institute, Oslo, Norway, “Glacial Water Impacts on the Chemical Characteristics of Sea Ice and Seawater and Ocean Acidification in Svalbard Fjords”.

Continue reading ‘IGS global seminar series: glacial water impacts on the chemical characteristics of sea ice and seawater and ocean acidification in Svalbard Fjords’

Presentation: Ocean acidification on the Great Barrier Reef: the future is now

Thursday 26th of November 11:00 to 12:00hrs (AEST)

https://jcu.zoom.us/j/88350515490 Password: 730762

Abstract:Ocean acidification, the increase in seawater CO2 with all its associated consequences, is relatively well understood in open oceans. In shelf seas such as the Great Barrier Reef, processes are much less understood, due to complex interactions with water quality and biological processes. I will show new data how ocean acidification has been progressing in the Great Barrier Reef, and its direct and indirect effects on coral reefs of the GBR, including shifts from corals to seaweed, impaired coral recruitment, and increasing bioerosion. Our new data from the Great Barrier Reef suggest that functional changes are already occurring, measurably affecting coralline algae, and coral recruitment and promoting macroalgae. Although most reefs are still net accreting, some reefs in marginal locations and high latitudes have started to dissolve in winter. The future integrity of GBR reefs under increasing ocean acidification will depend on their specific biophysical properties, and effective mitigation of the cumulative stressors from nutrient pollution. Unlike a clean-up of water quality, OA is irreversible on time scales of thousands of years, and there is no latitudinal escape, re-emphasising the imperative for rapid action on atmospheric CO2 pollution.

Continue reading ‘Presentation: Ocean acidification on the Great Barrier Reef: the future is now’

Virtual ASLO awards reception on 1 Dec

The ASLO Zoom Virtual Awards Reception will take place on Tuesday, December 1 from 12:00 – 1:00 pm US EST.

ASLO Awards Chair Amina Pollard will introduce each of the awardees with a brief summary of their achievements. The award talks they would have presented in Madison are being pre-recorded and will be posted on our YouTube channel prior to the event for you to watch at your leisure (the two talks from OSM are already posted). Following the group introduction, there will be breakout rooms for each award winner for some informal networking time.

Register for the event and/or leave a message of congratulations for the award winners at: https://www.aslo.org/2020-awards-virtual-reception/

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Next generation pH sensors

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the ocean has become increasingly acidic due to uptake of atmospheric CO2. There is an urgent need for in situ pH measurements to provide a high spatial and temporal resolution. However, today’s ship-based measurements cannot achieve this. While the introduction of intelligent and low-cost autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) provide the platform to obtain the data, the development of small, reliable pH sensors for deployment on these smaller AUV’s lags behind. ANB Sensors Ltd have identified and filed patents for a disruptive, enabling technology which allows for pH measurement in demanding aqueous media. ANB is running an INNOVATE UK funded project to translate its sensing technology into a system suitable for AUV deployment. This presentation highlights the solid state chemistry behind the concept, details results from recent field trials, and shows how the sensing technology is being adapted to AUV systems for trials.

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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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