Archive for the 'Newsletters and reports' Category

Report on the ocean acidification crisis in Massachusetts

Since the industrial revolution, the world’s oceans have become increasingly acidic. The main drivers of ocean acidification in Massachusetts are (1) global increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide resulting from anthropogenic emissions, and (2) local nutrient pollution leading to the eutrophication of coastal waters.

Many marine species that evolved under less acidic conditions are threatened by ocean acidification, including some that are critical to the Massachusetts economy. Species that are both economically important and vulnerable to acidification include mollusks such as the sea scallop and eastern oyster.

Massachusetts will be disproportionately affected by ocean acidification due to the relative importance of its coastal economies and environments.

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Futureproofing the green-lipped mussel aquaculture industry against ocean acidification

Two mitigation strategies – waste shell and aeration – were tested in field experiments to see how effective they are at mitigating acidification around mussel farms. This report outlines the results and recommendations from this research. 


Primary results:

  • The inner Firth of Thames currently experiences the lowest seasonal pH of the sites monitored, with a daily minimum of 7.84 (7.79–7.96) in autumn, with short-term (15-minute) pH minima as low as 7.2. Time-series data in the inner and outer Firth of Thames, and also on a mussel farm in the western Firth, show episodic declines in carbonate saturation to the critical carbonate saturation state ΩAR = 1.0 at which solid aragonite (the form of carbonate in mussel shells) will start to dissolve. Consequently, mussels in the Firth of Thames experience episodic corrosive conditions.
  • The mean pH in the Marlborough Sounds region is projected to decrease by 0.15–0.4 by 2100 depending on future emission scenario. The corresponding decline of 0.5–1.25 in the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAR), results in the critical threshold of ΩAR =1 being reached by 2100 under the worst-case scenario. These projections are based only on future CO2 emission scenarios and do not consider other coastal sources of acidity in coastal waters which may also alter in the future.

Continue reading ‘Futureproofing the green-lipped mussel aquaculture industry against ocean acidification’

Ecosystem status report of the California current for 2019–20: a summary of ecosystem indicators compiled by the California current integrated ecosystem assessment team (CCIEA)


This document is an expansion of the ecosystem status report (ESR) provided by the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Team (CCIEA Team) to the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) in March 2020 (Harvey et al. 2020). The CCIEA Team provides ESRs annually to PFMC, as one component of the overall CCIEA goal of providing quantitative, integrative science tools, products, and synthesis in support of a more holistic (ecosystem-based) approach to managing marine resources in the California Current. The ESR features a suite of indicators codeveloped by the CCIEA Team and PFMC. The suite of indicators was initially identified in 2009, and has been refined and updated over the years to best capture the current state of the California Current ecosystem (CCE). The analyses in this document represent our best understanding of environmental, ecological, and socioeconomic conditions in this ecosystem roughly through late 2019 and early 2020. Because the time required to process data varies for different indicators, some of the resulting time series are slightly more up-to-date than others. The time series for some indicators (snowpack, sea lion reproduction and pup growth, seabirds, fishery landings, fishery revenue, and nonfishing human activities) have been updated since the March 2020 report to PFMC (Harvey et al. 2020).

Continue reading ‘Ecosystem status report of the California current for 2019–20: a summary of ecosystem indicators compiled by the California current integrated ecosystem assessment team (CCIEA)’

New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, April – July 2020

The new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period April-July 2020. This newsletter highlights a side event at the UN High-Level Political Forum and the Annual meeting of the SOLAR-IMBeR Ocean Acidification Working Group. The “OA-ICC Highlights” is a quarterly newsletter. Previous editions can be viewed here.

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New edition of the “Ocean Acidification Report” by Global Ocean Health

The “Ocean Acidification Report” is a timely compilation of news from the front lines of ocean acidification research, legislation, resources, and profiles from the waterfront.

The September 2020 edition covers topic such as Climate Change Effects on Aquaculture, Changes in Fish Communities under OA, 10-year OA Roadmap Released, Coral Reefs, Carbon Myths & Realities and more.

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Actes du Colloque: acidification des océans : conséquences sur les écosystèmes et les activités humaines (in French)

Qu’est-ce que l’acidification des océans ? Quelles en seront les conséquences potentielles sur les activités économiques ? Comment réagir ? Telles sont les questions qui ont été abordées lors de cette journée qui a rassemblé scientifiques, acteurs professionnels et associations.

Organisé par la FRB et le MTES en partenariat avec l’Ifremer, ce colloque s’appuie sur les expériences de terrain et sur les résultats des projets scientifiques financés par le ministère de l’écologie dans le cadre du programme de recherche “Acidification des océans”.

Continue reading ‘Actes du Colloque: acidification des océans : conséquences sur les écosystèmes et les activités humaines (in French)’

New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, January – March 2020

pdf snipThe new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period January – March 2020. This newsletter highlights a capacity building workshop held in India, a Special Issue on socio-economic impacts of ocean acidification impacts to coral reefs, and an update on the Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification. The “OA-ICC Highlights” is a quarterly newsletter. Previous editions can be viewed here.

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Emerging ocean acidification threatens Baltic Sea ecosystems

More jellyfish but fewer mussels – the expected spread of ocean acidification can have major effects on species composition in the Baltic Sea. It may also make the water slimier and less attractive for swimming. To protect unique ecosystems and future food production, carbon dioxide emissions must be dramatically reduced and measures must be taken against eutrophication, overfishing and releases of hazardous substances.

It is now well known that the world’s large-scale emissions of greenhouse gases are leading to climate change and global warming. However, there is less awareness of what has been called “the other carbon dioxide problem” – ocean acidification.

Continue reading ‘Emerging ocean acidification threatens Baltic Sea ecosystems’

New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, October – December 2019

highlightsThe new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period October – December 2019. This newsletter highlights the UNFCCC COP25, an IAEA training course on measuring ocean acidification using simplified methodologies, a regional workshop in Tanzania, and other updates.

The “OA-ICC Highlights” is a quarterly newsletter. Previous editions can be viewed here.

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An annual update on the state of ocean acidification science in Alaska – 2019 update

What is Ocean Acidification?

Scientists estimate that the ocean is 30% more acidic today than it was 300 years ago, traceable to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel burning and land-use change, such as deforestation. As human-generated CO2 is released into the atmosphere, about a third is absorbed by the ocean. The additional CO2 lowers the pH of the seawater, driving the process known as ocean acidification (OA). The current pace of OA is faster than any time on record — 10 times faster than the last major acidification event 55 million years ago.

Why is Alaska at Risk?

Ocean acidification is expected to progress faster and more severely in Alaska than lower latitudes. Waters in Alaska are both ‘cold and old’: cooler water temperatures and global circulation patterns mean that Alaska waters naturally hold more CO2 year round. On top of this high baseline concentration of CO2, other processes also make Alaska’s waters more naturally acidic on a seasonal scale.

Continue reading ‘An annual update on the state of ocean acidification science in Alaska – 2019 update’


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