Archive for the 'Newsletters and reports' Category

PICES Press: Working together at the 4th GOA-ON International Workshop

The North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) summer 2019 newsletter “PICES Press”, was recently published. This newsletter highlights the 4th GOA-ON International Workshop in Hangzhou, China, and PICES’ participation in this workshop.

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4th GOA-ON International Workshop summary report online

The summary report from the 4th Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) International Workshop, held in Hangzhou, China on 14-17 April 2019, is now available through the GOA-ON website here. This summary outlines the main recommendations from each of the parallel sessions, overviews of the special events, and workshop outcomes.

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New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, April – June 2019

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The new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period April – June 2019. This newsletter highlights the 4th GOA-ON International Workshop, a workshop on human vulnerabilities to ocean acidification, a training course on designing ocean acidification experiments in a multi-stressor context, updates from the Community of Ocean Action on Ocean Acidification, and other items.

The “OA-ICC Highlights” is a quarterly newsletter. Previous editions can be viewed here.

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Ocean acidification highlighted in JCOMM Ocean Observing System Report Card 2019

OCEAN ACIDIFICATION
Ocean carbon uptake and acidification

Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have substantially increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last two centuries. Uptake of CO2 by the ocean mitigates the effects of climate change. Observations show that this CO2 causes changes in seawater chemistry, including decreases in seawater pH known as ocean acidification. This process, detrimental to sea life and ocean services, needs to be constantly monitored through sustained ocean observations, in order to develop meaningful projections of future impacts on marine ecosystems, and to implement effective long-term mitigation and adaptation strategies. Ocean acidification has been recognized as vital to sustainable development by the United Nations and the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14(1) and its indicator 14.3.1(2). Under the custodianship of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, this indicator mandates measurement of average marine acidity (pH) at representative sampling sites globally.

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Oregon’s draft ocean acidification & hypoxia action plan

This OAH Action Plan was developed in recognition of the OAH impacts that we see today, in the hopes of minimizing the impacts for tomorrow, and altering the trajectory of ocean changes for future generations. Because Oregon is one of the first states to feel the impacts of OAH, it is our intent that the OAH Action Plan will contain actions that are meaningful locally, and in fighting the global challenges of climate and ocean changes.  Additionally, the Action Plan will serve as a model for others to apply to their own geographical and political context. Once adopted by Governor Brown, the Action Plan will guide Oregon’s efforts and become Oregon’s submission to the International Alliance to Combat Ocean Acidification, and thus will be shared with the region and world.

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New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, January – March 2019

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The new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period January – March 2019. This newsletter highlights the Blue Oceans Conference, the Commonwealth OA Action Group, the Community of Ocean Action on OA, and capacity building activities in Latin America.

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A kelping hand

As carbon dioxide is pumped into the atmosphere, the oceans absorb much of it, changing the chemical balance of the seawater. The phenomenon is termed ocean acidification and it’s a potential threat for some marine species. Now, the shellfish industry have to combat chemical changes as the water in their hatcheries becomes inhospitable. But Davis has a plan: kelp.

Led by the Puget Sound Restoration Fund, Davis and a crew of oceanographers, biologists and chemists started testing kelp’s natural ability to absorb dissolved carbon dioxide in Puget Sound’s water in 2016. They wanted to know if kelp could soak up enough carbon to create a halo of healthy water around areas growing shellfish. Ocean water has remained slightly basic for thousands of years, but in the last two centuries it has begun to increase in acidity. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration projects seawater will be 150 percent more acidic by the end of the century, if carbon dioxide emission rates continue to increase at the current pace.

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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book