Archive for the 'Newsletters and reports' Category

The effects of climate change and ocean acidification on Corallina seaweeds

Significant increases in the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere owing to human combustion of fossil fuels and deforestation, is having profound effects on the world’s oceans. Two of the main effects on the marine environment are increased sea surface temperatures due to climate change, and ocean acidification. Increased sea surface temperatures are caused by the global warming effect of climate change. As the world’s atmosphere warms up, our oceans slowly absorb the heat. To date, the oceans have absorbed over 80% of the heat added to the atmosphere by climate change. This has caused an increase in global average sea surface temperature of approximately 0.69oC.

Ocean acidification refers to a decrease in ocean pH (increasing acidity) over decades or more that is caused by uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere. Because human activities are releasing CO2 into the atmosphere very quickly (a major cause of climate change), the ocean is taking up CO2 faster today than it has in the past. When CO2 dissolves in seawater, it acts like a weak acid and, through a series of chemical reactions, causes an increase in the acidity of the seawater, i.e. an increase in free hydrogen ions (H+). Additionally, increased CO2 concentration in seawater also causes a reduction in carbonate ions (CO32+), which are very important building blocks of calcifying marine species, i.e. those species that deposit shells, tubes, or other skeletal structures out of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), e.g. corals. Since the industrial revolution, the pH of the world’s oceans has decreased by approximately 0.1 units, which represents a 30% increase in H+ ions and a significant decrease in the availability of CO32+ to marine species.

As humans continue to release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, climate change and ocean acidification will continue at a speed never seen before in the Earth’s history. Predictions of future concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), show that by the year 2100 we can expect increases in sea surface temperature of approximately + 4oC and a further decrease in pH of 0.3 – 0.5 units (i.e. a 90 – 150% increase in hydrogen ions).

Continue reading ‘The effects of climate change and ocean acidification on Corallina seaweeds’

Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) newsletter: summer 2018

CaptureThe summer 2018 edition of the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) has been released. The newsletter includes updates from the GOA-ON Executive Council, international capacity building efforts, as well as upcoming events and funding opportunities.

Continue reading ‘Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON) newsletter: summer 2018’

California ocean acidification action plan is available for public comment

The public comment period is open from Wednesday, August 1 through Friday, August 31, 2018. All comments should be submitted by email to: COPCpublic@resources.ca.gov. Questions can be directed to Ocean Protection Council Climate Change Policy Advisor, Jenn Phillips at: Jennifer.Phillips@resources.ca.gov

Continue reading ‘California ocean acidification action plan is available for public comment’

New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, April – June 2018

CaptureThe new edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights” summarizes the project’s main activities and achievements over the period April – June 2018. The content is structured around the three major areas of work of the OA-ICC: science, capacity building and communication. Links to the project’s main resources are also provided.

Continue reading ‘New edition of the “OA-ICC Highlights”, April – June 2018’

New edition of the “Ocean Acidification Report” by Global Ocean Health (GOH)

The “Ocean Acidification Report” is a timely compilation of news from the front lines of ocean acidification research, legislation, resources, and profiles from the waterfront.

The July 2018 edition covers topic such as kelp mitigation, OA and coralline algae, mussels, Pebble Mine, carbon policy, the NSA Annual Meeting, copepods, The Ocean Foundation, and more.

Go to report.

Comparing ISFET and glass electrode pH sensors part 1: stable bath test

Comparison of the ISFET pH sensor on the SeapHOx™ V2 to the glass-electrode pH sensor on the HydroCAT-EP in a stable test bath. Compares the performance of different pH measurement technologies in controlled conditions to provide a baseline for field-comparisons.

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Impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture – synthesis of current knowledge, adaptation and mitigation options

The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement recognizes the need for effective and progressive responses to the urgent threat of climate change, through mitigation and adaptation measures, while taking into account the particular vulnerabilities of food production systems. The inclusion of adaptation measures in the fisheries and aquaculture sector is currently hampered by a widespread lack of targeted analyses of the sector’s vulnerabilities to climate change and associated risks, as well as the opportunities and responses available. This report provides the most up-to-date information on the disaggregated impacts of climate change for marine and inland fisheries, and aquaculture, in the context of poverty alleviation and the differential dependency of countries on fish and fishery resources.

Continue reading ‘Impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture – synthesis of current knowledge, adaptation and mitigation options’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book