Archive for the 'Education' Category

Workshop: “Deep Dive into Ocean Acidification”, 21 September 2017, San Francisco

First part of the Local Climate Science & Education Series by BayCLIC

Date: Thursday, 21 September 2017, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM, Doors open at 12:30 PM

For: Formal and informal educators (all ages); Researchers

Cost: Free- light refreshments provided

Take a “deep dive into ocean acidification” in the first workshop of the BayCLIC Local Climate Science & Education Series at Fort Mason, San Francisco. The series brings the Bay Area’s science and education communities together to explore local climate research, program-specific applications, and place-based solutions. The workshop on ocean acidification is an opportunity for educators to receive the most up-to-date information directly from researchers and for scientists to practice best communication skills that can aid future educational collaborations.

Continue reading ‘Workshop: “Deep Dive into Ocean Acidification”, 21 September 2017, San Francisco’

Ocean Acidification Kiosk arrives in Cordova

Photo credit: C. Gibbens-Stimson

Learn how to take action to support future fisheries!

An interactive ocean acidification kiosk developed by the Alaska Marine Conservation Council as an educational resource to educate Alaskans about ocean acidification, is now installed at the Cordova Center.

It will be on display there until late fall.

The kiosk offers short videos featuring the perspectives of researchers, fishermen and seafood industry leaders from around Alaska, with easy to understand science for viewers of all ages.

“The kiosk is a tool for learning about ocean acidification from scientists and concerned people in the seafood business,” said Dorothy Childers, project coordinator for AMCC. “More research and discussion is needed to answer all the questions, but now is the time for finding out what lies ahead and taking useful action to support future generations of fishermen.”

Continue reading ‘Ocean Acidification Kiosk arrives in Cordova’

Questions as indicators of ocean literacy: students’ online asynchronous discussion with a marine scientist

In this article, 61 high-school students learned about ocean acidification through a virtual laboratory followed by a virtual lecture and an asynchronous discussion with a marine scientist on an online platform: VoiceThread. This study focuses on the students’ development of ocean literacy when prompted to ask questions to the scientist. The students’ questions were thematically analysed to assess (1) the kind of reasoning that can be discerned as premises of the students’ questions and (2) what possibilities for enhancing ocean literacy emerge in this instructional activity. The results show how interacting with a scientist gives the students an entry point to the world of natural sciences with its complexity, uncertainty and choices that go beyond the idealised form in which natural sciences often are presented in school. This activity offers an affordable way of bringing marine science to school by providing extensive expertise from a marine scientist. Students get a chance to mobilise their pre-existing knowledge in the field of marine science. The holistic expertise of the marine scientist allows students to explore and reason around a very wide range of ideas and aspect of natural sciences that goes beyond the range offered by the school settings.

Continue reading ‘Questions as indicators of ocean literacy: students’ online asynchronous discussion with a marine scientist’

Climate Kids – Ocean Acidification

In collaboration with the Climate Science Alliance – Climate Kids Program, this field trip explores how Cabrillo scientist investigate climate change and ocean acidification in the Rocky Intertidal ecosystem. Through a two part trip, students will learn how ocean acidification works, how it affects the animals at the park, and actions they can take to help.

Climate Kids is a series of community level collaborative projects that provide youth education on climate change through science activities, storytelling, and art. Each Climate Kids project brings together local artists, scientists, educators, and storytellers to engage  students of all socioeconomic levels and inspire them to become environmental stewards.

Through partnerships with climate scientists and qualified educators, we encourage curiosity about the natural world while providing youth the tools necessary to make educated decisions about how to protect our planet in the future.

Continue reading ‘Climate Kids – Ocean Acidification’

Embedding probeware technology in the context of ocean acidification in elementary science methods courses

Research indicates that preservice teacher (PT) education programs can positively impact perceptions of scientific probeware use in K-8 environments. Despite the potential of probeware to improve science instruction and student engagement, its use in elementary education has been limited. Sixty-seven PT enrolled across three sections of an elementary science methods course participated in a mixed-methods study through which they utilized probeware in a thematic experience on ocean acidification. One-way repeated measures ANOVA of pre and post survey data measuring subscales of utility, ability, and intent to use probeware demonstrated a statistically significant increase with medium to large effect sizes for all subscales across all sections (p<0.01,η2p=0.384;p<0.001,η2p=0.517;p<0.001,η2p=0.214)p0.01ηp20.384p0.001ηp20.517p0.001ηp20.214. Analysis of reflective journals revealed over 60% felt the multiple capabilities (notably graphing) of probeware make it a useful classroom tool, and almost one-half believed that its use makes science more enjoyable and engaging. Mapping of the unitized data from the journals on the Next Generation Science Standards suggested that probeware use especially engages learners in planning and carrying out investigations and in analyzing and interpreting data. Journals also revealed that despite PT having prior experience with probeware in science courses, its use in their future elementary classroom is conditional on having a positive experience with probeware in a science methods course. Further, embedding a probeware experience in a unit on ocean acidification provides PT with strategies for addressing climate change and engaging in argument from evidence.

Continue reading ‘Embedding probeware technology in the context of ocean acidification in elementary science methods courses’

Call for applications: “Practical Training Courses on Ocean Acidification”, October – November 2017, Suva, Fiji

Course I (30 October – 3 November): Introduction to Ocean Acidification Monitoring and Research 

Course II (6 November – 10 November): Applied Ocean Acidification Monitoring and Research Techniques 

Host institute: University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji

Overview

These courses are part of a broad effort by The Ocean Foundation, through its International Ocean Acidification Initiative, to expand the capacity of scientists and resource managers around the world to monitor, understand, and respond to ocean acidification in their region. The Ocean Foundation’s work is supported by the partners listed above and is coordinated closely with the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON). We invite interested participants to apply for one or both courses described here.

The courses advertised here are meant for those who have the skills and interest in implementing monitoring programs. Though we have specified educational and occupational requirements for participants, our primary goal is to ensure that stakeholders from the Pacific Islands have access to information about how ocean acidification might affect them locally. Therefore, if you do not meet the educational or occupational requirements listed for the courses below, please contact Alexis Valauri-Orton at avalauriorton@oceanfdn.org to discuss how you might be able to participate.

Continue reading ‘Call for applications: “Practical Training Courses on Ocean Acidification”, October – November 2017, Suva, Fiji’

All aboard the carbon cruise

University of Miami students and researchers are blogging during a month-long expedition in the Gulf of Mexico to study ocean acidification.

An interdisciplinary and international team of scientists and students set sail aboard the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ship Ronald H. Brown on Tuesday, July 18 for a 36-day expedition in the Gulf of Mexico.

The researchers – including graduate student Joletta Silva and two recent alumni, Emma Pontes and Leah Chomiak, from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science – represent institutions from the United States, Mexico and Cuba.

The expedition, entitled the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC), is the third of such research cruises led by NOAA AOML (Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory) for its Ocean Acidification Program to better understand how ocean chemistry along U.S. coasts is changing in response to ocean acidification. This cruise is the first that will explore Mexican waters of the Gulf of Mexico, and is considered to be the most comprehensive ocean acidification cruise to date in the region.

Continue reading ‘All aboard the carbon cruise’


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OA-ICC HIGHLIGHTS

Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

OUP book