Physiological responses of a coccolithophore to multiple environmental drivers

Highlights
• Coccolithophores were more stressful in the higher solar UV irradiance exposures.

• The cells increased their functional antennae sizes under the future ocean conditions.

• Coccolithophores photosynthesized more in the high CO2 and warming ocean.

• Synergistical or antagonistic interactions were observed among multiple drivers.

Abstract
Ocean acidification is known to affect primary producers differentially in terms of species and environmental conditions, with controversial results obtained under different experimental setups. In this work we examined the physiological performances of the coccolithophore Gephyrocapsa oceanica that had been acclimated to 1000 μatm CO2 for ~400 generations, and then exposed to multiple drivers, light intensity, light fluctuating frequency, temperature and UV radiation. Here, we show that increasing light intensity resulted in higher non-photochemical quenching and the effective absorption cross-section of PSII. The effective photochemical efficiency (Fv′/Fm′) decreased with increased levels of light, which was counterbalanced by fluctuating light regimes. The greenhouse condition acts synergistically with decreasing fluctuating light frequency to increase the Fv′/Fm′ and photosynthetic carbon fixation rate. Our data suggest that the coccolithophorid would be more stressed with increased exposures to solar UV irradiances, though its photosynthetic carbon fixation could be enhanced under the greenhouse condition.

Jin P., Liu N. & Gao K., 2019. Physiological responses of a coccolithophore to multiple environmental drivers. Marine Pollution Bulletin 146: 225-235. Article (subscription required).

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Ocean acidification in the IPCC AR5 WG II

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