Evidences of CO2 leakage during the last deglaciation: the need to understand deep-ocean carbonate chemistry of the Arabian Sea

It is generally accepted view that the ventilation of Southern Ocean during the last deglaciation was the key factor in atmospheric CO2 rise. Further, other sites were identified, like the western equatorial Pacific, the Sub-Antarctic Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Now there are evidences that CO2 was also released from the eastern Arabian Sea. The Arabian Sea is unique in characteristic, being land locked from the North and affected by monsoon winds and seasonal reversing circulations. Furthermore, the CO2 outgassing noticed during deglaciation makes it an interesting region to understand if the outgassing occurred from the deeper waters and hence led to any rise in deepwater [CO3 2−]. 

Naik S. N. & Naik S. S. 2018. Evidences of CO2 leakage during the last deglaciation: the need to understand deep-ocean carbonate chemistry of the Arabian Sea. Journal of the Geological Society of India 92 (4): 404-406. Article (subscription required).

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