Archive for October, 2007

A Sea Change (movie)

Imagine a world without fish. The scenario seems inconceivable. But according to scientists such a catastrophe will in fact play out in coming generations unless we take bold actions to slow or stop Ocean Acidification.

Continue reading ‘A Sea Change (movie)’

Ending with a wimper (sic)

Some experts fear that the Earth is more likely to be pushed past its tipping point by numerous small climate-change perturbations rather than a single massive upheaval.

Consider the plight of the lowly ocean periwinkle, a.k.a. Littorina littorea, once a staple of street stalls in cockney London. That delicious catchphrase “to winkle something out” derived from using a wire hook to extract this snail from its shell.

Continue reading ‘Ending with a wimper (sic)’

Ending with a wimper (sic)

Some experts fear that the Earth is more likely to be pushed past its tipping point by numerous small climate-change perturbations rather than a single massive upheaval.

Consider the plight of the lowly ocean periwinkle, a.k.a. Littorina littorea, once a staple of street stalls in cockney London. That delicious catchphrase “to winkle something out” derived from using a wire hook to extract this snail from its shell.
Continue reading ‘Ending with a wimper (sic)’

Global warming destroying coral reefs too, says RP scientist

ALAMINOS CITY, Philippines — The country’s coral beds may be under water but they are not immune to the effects of global warming, a scientist who pioneered the study of corals in the Philippines has warned.

Dr. Edgardo Gomez, the founding director of the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute, said the country’s corals were already under threat from bleaching and illegal fishing, but ocean “acidification” caused by excessive carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (which also causes global warming) has become a more “serious concern.”
Continue reading ‘Global warming destroying coral reefs too, says RP scientist’

Response of eelgrass Zostera marina to CO2 enrichment: possible impacts of climate change and potential for remediation of coastal habitats

Projected increases in dissolved aqueous concentrations of carbon dioxide [CO2(aq)] may have significant impacts on photosynthesis of CO2-limited organisms such as seagrasses. Short-term CO2(aq) enrichment increases photosynthetic rates and reduces light requirements for growth and survival of individual eelgrass Zostera marina L. shoots growing in the laboratory under artificial light regimes for at least 45 d. This study examined the effects of long-term CO2(aq) enrichment on the performance of eelgrass growing under natural light-replete (33% surface irradiance) and light-limited (5% surface irradiance) conditions for a period of 1 yr.
Continue reading ‘Response of eelgrass Zostera marina to CO2 enrichment: possible impacts of climate change and potential for remediation of coastal habitats’

Copepod feeding and reproduction in relation to phytoplankton development during the PeECE III mesocosm experiment

Within the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment (PeECE III) experiment, reproduction and feeding of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus was monitored in relation to phytoplankton development in two mesocosms, at present 1× (350 μatm) and ca 3× present (1050 μatm) CO2 concentrations, respectively.
Continue reading ‘Copepod feeding and reproduction in relation to phytoplankton development during the PeECE III mesocosm experiment’

Competition for inorganic and organic forms of nitrogen and phosphorous between phytoplankton and bacteria during an Emiliania huxleyi spring bloom (PeECE II)

Løvdal et al.

Using 15N and 33P, we measured the turnover of organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) substrates, and the partitioning of N and P from these sources into two size fractions of marine osmotrophs during the course of a phytoplankton bloom in a nutrient manipulated mesocosm.
Continue reading ‘Competition for inorganic and organic forms of nitrogen and phosphorous between phytoplankton and bacteria during an Emiliania huxleyi spring bloom (PeECE II)’

Effects of increased seawater pCO2 on early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas

Kurihara et al.

This study demonstrated that the increased partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in seawater and the attendant acidification that are projected to occur by the year 2300 will severely impact the early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

Continue reading ‘Effects of increased seawater pCO2 on early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas’

Dissolution of Carbonate Sediments Under Rising p CO2 and Ocean Acidification: Observations from Devil’s Hole, Bermuda

Rising atmospheric pCO2 and ocean acidification originating from human activities could result in increased dissolution of metastable carbonate minerals in shallow-water marine sediments. In the present study, in situ dissolution of carbonate sedimentary particles in Devil’s Hole, Bermuda, was observed during summer when thermally driven density stratification restricted mixing between the bottom water and the surface mixed layer and microbial decomposition of organic matter in the subthermocline layer produced pCO2 levels similar to or higher than those levels anticipated by the end of the 21st century.

Continue reading ‘Dissolution of Carbonate Sediments Under Rising p CO2 and Ocean Acidification: Observations from Devil’s Hole, Bermuda’

Acid Threat

Tiny creatures near the base of the marine food chain lead perilous lives at best. Now they face a man-made threat. No, not global warming this time, though the root cause is the same. As the level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) rises, it is not only heating the globe but also dissolving in ocean waters, turning them more acidic. For shell-building animals that can mean a corrosive, even deadly environment.
Continue reading ‘Acid Threat’


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